Institute Regional du Cancer Montpellier

Montpellier, France

Institute Regional du Cancer Montpellier

Montpellier, France
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Bartelink H.,Netherlands Cancer Institute | Maingon P.,Center Georges Francois Leclerc | Poortmans P.,Institute Verbeeten | Poortmans P.,Radboud University Nijmegen | And 19 more authors.
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2015

Background: Since the introduction of breast-conserving treatment, various radiation doses after lumpectomy have been used. In a phase 3 randomised controlled trial, we investigated the effect of a radiation boost of 16 Gy on overall survival, local control, and fibrosis for patients with stage I and II breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving treatment compared with patients who received no boost. Here, we present the 20-year follow-up results. Methods: Patients with microscopically complete excision for invasive disease followed by whole-breast irradiation of 50 Gy in 5 weeks were centrally randomised (1:1) with a minimisation algorithm to receive 16 Gy boost or no boost, with minimisation for age, menopausal status, presence of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ, clinical tumour size, nodal status, and institution. Neither patients nor investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was overall survival in the intention-to-treat population. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02295033. Findings: Between May 24, 1989, and June 25, 1996, 2657 patients were randomly assigned to receive no radiation boost and 2661 patients randomly assigned to receive a radiation boost. Median follow-up was 17·2 years (IQR 13·0-19·0). 20-year overall survival was 59·7% (99% CI 56·3-63·0) in the boost group versus 61·1% (57·6-64·3) in the no boost group, hazard ratio (HR) 1·05 (99% CI 0·92-1·19, p=0·323). Ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence was the first treatment failure for 354 patients (13%) in the no boost group versus 237 patients (9%) in the boost group, HR 0·65 (99% CI 0·52-0·81, p<0·0001). The 20-year cumulative incidence of ipsilatelal breast tumour recurrence was 16·4% (99% CI 14·1-18·8) in the no boost group versus 12·0% (9·8-14·4) in the boost group. Mastectomies as first salvage treatment for ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence occurred in 279 (79%) of 354 patients in the no boost group versus 178 (75%) of 237 in the boost group. The cumulative incidence of severe fibrosis at 20 years was 1·8% (99% CI 1·1-2·5) in the no boost group versus 5·2% (99% CI 3·9-6·4) in the boost group (p<0·0001). Interpretation: A radiation boost after whole-breast irradiation has no effect on long-term overall survival, but can improve local control, with the largest absolute benefit in young patients, although it increases the risk of moderate to severe fibrosis. The extra radiation dose can be avoided in most patients older than age 60 years. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | University of Maryland Baltimore County, Southpoint Cancer Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Fundacion Publica Galega de Medicina Xenomica SERGAS and 19 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Radiotherapy and oncology : journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology | Year: 2016

Several small studies have indicated that the ATM rs1801516 SNP is associated with risk of normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy. However, the findings have not been consistent. In order to test this SNP in a well-powered study, an individual patient data meta-analysis was carried out by the International Radiogenomics Consortium.The analysis included 5456 patients from 17 different cohorts. 2759 patients were given radiotherapy for breast cancer and 2697 for prostate cancer. Eight toxicity scores (overall toxicity, acute toxicity, late toxicity, acute skin toxicity, acute rectal toxicity, telangiectasia, fibrosis and late rectal toxicity) were analyzed. Adjustments were made for treatment and patient related factors with potential impact on the risk of toxicity.For all endpoints except late rectal toxicity, a significantly increased risk of toxicity was found for carriers of the minor (Asn) allele with odds ratios of approximately 1.5 for acute toxicity and 1.2 for late toxicity. The results were consistent with a co-dominant pattern of inheritance.This study convincingly showed a significant association between the ATM rs1801516 Asn allele and increased risk of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity.


PubMed | EORTC Headquarters, University Hospitals Leuven, Institute Regional du Cancer Montpellier, Center Georges Francois Leclerc and 12 more.
Type: Clinical Trial, Phase III | Journal: The Lancet. Oncology | Year: 2015

Since the introduction of breast-conserving treatment, various radiation doses after lumpectomy have been used. In a phase 3 randomised controlled trial, we investigated the effect of a radiation boost of 16 Gy on overall survival, local control, and fibrosis for patients with stage I and II breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving treatment compared with patients who received no boost. Here, we present the 20-year follow-up results.Patients with microscopically complete excision for invasive disease followed by whole-breast irradiation of 50 Gy in 5 weeks were centrally randomised (1:1) with a minimisation algorithm to receive 16 Gy boost or no boost, with minimisation for age, menopausal status, presence of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ, clinical tumour size, nodal status, and institution. Neither patients nor investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was overall survival in the intention-to-treat population. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02295033.Between May 24, 1989, and June 25, 1996, 2657 patients were randomly assigned to receive no radiation boost and 2661 patients randomly assigned to receive a radiation boost. Median follow-up was 17.2 years (IQR 13.0-19.0). 20-year overall survival was 59.7% (99% CI 56.3-63.0) in the boost group versus 61.1% (57.6-64.3) in the no boost group, hazard ratio (HR) 1.05 (99% CI 0.92-1.19, p=0.323). Ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence was the first treatment failure for 354 patients (13%) in the no boost group versus 237 patients (9%) in the boost group, HR 0.65 (99% CI 0.52-0.81, p<0.0001). The 20-year cumulative incidence of ipsilatelal breast tumour recurrence was 16.4% (99% CI 14.1-18.8) in the no boost group versus 12.0% (9.8-14.4) in the boost group. Mastectomies as first salvage treatment for ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence occurred in 279 (79%) of 354 patients in the no boost group versus 178 (75%) of 237 in the boost group. The cumulative incidence of severe fibrosis at 20 years was 1.8% (99% CI 1.1-2.5) in the no boost group versus 5.2% (99% CI 3.9-6.4) in the boost group (p<0.0001).A radiation boost after whole-breast irradiation has no effect on long-term overall survival, but can improve local control, with the largest absolute benefit in young patients, although it increases the risk of moderate to severe fibrosis. The extra radiation dose can be avoided in most patients older than age 60 years.Fonds Cancer, Belgium.


PubMed | Medical Center Utrecht, EORTC Headquarters, Institute Regional du Cancer Montpellier, Center Georges Francois Leclerc and 12 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: JAMA oncology | Year: 2016

Prognostic factors of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) may change over time following breast-conserving therapy.The EORTC boost no boost trial showed that young age and high-grade invasive carcinoma were the most important risk factors for IBTR. This study reanalyses pathological prognostic factors related to IBTR using long-term follow-up.Participants included 5569 early-stage breast cancer patients, treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and whole-breast irradiation (WBI), who were randomized between no boost and a 16-Gy boost in the EORTC phase III boost no boost trial (1989-1996). A total of 1616 patients with a microscopically complete resection (according to local pathologists), included in the central pathology review, have been analyzed in this study. Median follow-up was 18.2 years.No further treatment or 16-Gy boost, after BCS and 50-Gy WBI.Time to ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) as first event.The 20-year cumulative incidence of IBTR in 1616 patients (160 events observed) was 15% (95% CI, 12%-17%). Young age (P<.001) and presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (HR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.36-3.38; P=.001) were associated with an increased risk of IBTR in multivariable analysis. The cumulative incidence of IBTR at 20 years was 34% (95% CI, 25%-41%), 14% (95% CI, 10%-18%), and 11% (95% CI, 8%-15%), in patients 40 years or younger, 41 to 50 years and 50 years or older, respectively (P<.001). This incidence was 18% (95% CI, 14%-22%) and 9% (95% CI, 6%-12%) for tumors with and without DCIS (P<.001). High-grade tumors relapsed more frequently early during follow-up but the relative effect of age and presence of DCIS seemed stable over time. The boost reduced the 20-year IBTR incidence from 31% (95% CI, 22%-39%) to 15% (95% CI, 8%-21%) (HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.22-0.62; P<.001) in high-risk patients (50 years with DCIS present).The association of high-grade invasive tumor with IBTR diminished during follow-up, while the effect of DCIS adjacent to invasive tumor seemed to remain stable. Therefore, patients with high-grade invasive tumors should be monitored closely, especially in the first 5 years, while additional DCIS is an indication for longer follow-up, emphasizing the importance of long-term trial follow-up to estimate absolute effects accurately.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02295033.


PubMed | University of Maryland Baltimore County, Institute Regional du Cancer Montpellier, University of Rochester, University of Manchester and 3 more.
Type: Review | Journal: Radiotherapy and oncology : journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology | Year: 2016

The optimal design and patient selection for interventional trials in radiogenomics seem trivial at first sight. However, radiogenomics do not give binary information like in e.g. targetable mutation biomarkers. Here, the risk to develop severe side effects is continuous, with increasing incidences of side effects with higher doses and/or volumes. In addition, a multi-SNP assay will produce a predicted probability of developing side effects and will require one or more cut-off thresholds for classifying risk into discrete categories. A classical biomarker trial design is therefore not optimal, whereas a risk factor stratification approach is more appropriate. Patient selection is crucial and this should be based on the dose-response relations for a specific endpoint. Alternatives to standard treatment should be available and this should take into account the preferences of patients. This will be discussed in detail.


Toulmonde M.,Institute Bergonie | Bonvalot S.,Institute Gustave Roussy | Ray-Coquard I.,Center Leon Berard | Stoeckle E.,Institute Bergonie | And 17 more authors.
Annals of Oncology | Year: 2014

Background: Retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS) are heterogeneous. Advanced stages include unresectable locoregional (LR) disease, abdominal sarcomatosis and distant metastasis. There is no available report assessing palliative chemotherapy in advanced RPS. This study analyzes management and outcome in a large cohort of patients with advanced RPS, considering main histological subtypes separately. Patients and methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients diagnosed with a RPS between 1 January 1988 and 31 December 2008 across 12 centers of the French Sarcoma Group. All cases were centrally reviewed by an expert pathologist. Results: Five-hundred eighty-six patients were included, 299 patients received palliative chemotherapy, with a median of two lines (range 0-8). Fifty patients underwent palliative surgery. Two hundred fifty-five patients (85%) were assessable for response after first line of chemotherapy. Among them, 69 patients (27%) had progressive disease, 145 (57%) had stable disease, 37 (14.5%) had partial response and 4 (1.5%) complete response. Median time from first line of palliative chemotherapy to progression was 5.9 months [4.9-7.3] and median overall survival (OS), 15.8 months [13-18]. In multivariate analysis, prognosis factors independently associated with poor OS were male gender, performance status (PS) >1 and grade >1. There was no difference according to stage of disease. Palliative surgery did not appear to add any survival benefit. Conclusion: These results emphasize the scarcity of available options for RPS in the advanced setting and the urgent need to develop new strategies. Patients with good PS should be included in clinical trials and best supportive care should be considered in those with poor PS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved.


El Messaoudi S.,Institute Of Recherche En Cancerologie Of Montpellier | El Messaoudi S.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | El Messaoudi S.,Montpellier University | El Messaoudi S.,Institute regional du Cancer Montpellier | And 10 more authors.
Clinica Chimica Acta | Year: 2013

Despite the growing interest in circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) analysis in various clinical fields, especially oncology and prenatal diagnosis, few studies on sample handling have been reported and no analytical consensus is available. The lack of consistency between the various protocols for sample handling and the techniques used for ccfDNA analysis is one of the major obstacles in translating ccfDNA analysis to clinical practice. Although this point is highlighted regularly in the published reviews on ccfDNA analysis, no standard operating procedure currently exists despite several ongoing clinical studies on ccfDNA analysis.This review examines the preanalytical parameters potentially affecting ccfDNA concentration and fragmentation at each preanalytical step from blood drawing to the storage of ccfDNA extracts.Analysis of data in the literature and our own observations revealed the influence of preanalytical factors on ccfDNA analysis. Based on these data, we determined the optimal preanalytical protocols for ccfDNA analysis and ultimately, a guideline for the translation of ccfDNA analysis in routine clinical practice. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Chaib-Mezrag H.,University of Kansas Medical Center | Lemacon D.,Institute Of Recherche En Cancerologie Of Montpellier | Lemacon D.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Lemacon D.,Montpellier University | And 13 more authors.
Molecular Cancer | Year: 2014

Background: Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I) is a human retrovirus associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive CD4 T-cell proliferative disease with dismal prognosis. The long latency preceding the development of the disease and the low incidence suggests that the virus itself is not sufficient for transformation and that genetic defects are required to create a permissive environment for leukemia. In fact, ATL cells are characterized by profound genetic modifications including structural and numerical chromosome alterations. Results: In this study we used molecular combing techniques to study the effect of the oncoprotein Tax on DNA replication. We found that replication forks have difficulties replicating complex DNA, fork progression is slower, and they pause or stall more frequently in the presence of Tax expression. Our results also show that Tax-associated replication defects are partially compensated by an increase in the firing of back-up origins. Consistent with these effects of Tax on DNA replication, an increase in double strand DNA breaks (DDSB) was seen in Tax expressing cells. Tax-mediated increases in DDSBs were associated with the ability of Tax to activate NF-kB and to stimulate intracellular nitric oxide production. We also demonstrated a reduced expression of human translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases Pol-H and Pol-K in HTLV-I-transformed T cells and ATL cells. This was associated with an increase in DNA breaks induced by Tax at specific genome regions, such as the c-Myc and the Bcl-2 major breakpoints. Consistent with the notion that the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway is hyperactive in HTLV-I-transformed cells, we found that inhibition of the NHEJ pathway induces significant killing of HTLV-I transformed cells and patient-derived leukemic ATL cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that, replication problems increase genetic instability in HTLV-I-transformed cells. As a result, abuse of NHEJ and a defective homologous repair (HR) DNA repair pathway can be targeted as a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of adult T-cell leukemia. © 2014 Chaib-Mezrag et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Djiane A.,University of Cambridge | Djiane A.,Institute Of Recherche En Cancerologie Of Montpellier | Djiane A.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Djiane A.,Montpellier University | And 7 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

During development, tissues and organs must coordinate growth and patterning so they reach the right size and shape. During larval stages, a dramatic increase in size and cell number of Drosophila wing imaginal discs is controlled by the action of several signaling pathways. Complex cross-talk between these pathways also pattern these discs to specify different regions with different fates and growth potentials. We show that the Notch signaling pathway is both required and sufficient to inhibit the activity of Yorkie (Yki), the Salvador/Warts/Hippo (SWH) pathway terminal transcription activator, but only in the central regions of the wing disc, where the TEAD factor and Yki partner Scalloped (Sd) is expressed. We show that this cross-talk between the Notch and SWH pathways is mediated, at least in part, by the Notch target and Sd partner Vestigial (Vg). We propose that, by altering the ratios between Yki, Sd and Vg, Notch pathway activation restricts the effects of Yki mediated transcription, therefore contributing to define a zone of low proliferation in the central wing discs. © 2014 Djiane et al.


PubMed | Institute Of Cancerologie Of Lorraine, Institute Regional du Cancer Montpellier, International Drug Development Institute IDDI, Center Leon Berard and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Oncotarget | Year: 2016

We sought to assess the benefit-risk balance of FOLFIRINOX versus gemcitabine in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma.We used generalized pairwise comparisons. This statistical method permits the simultaneous analysis of several prioritized outcome measures. The first priority outcome was survival time (OS). Differences in OS that exceeded two months were considered clinically relevant. The second priority outcome was toxicity. The overall treatment effect was quantified using the net chance of a better outcome, which can be interpreted as the net probability for a random patient treated in the FOLFIRINOX group to have a better overall outcome than a random patient in the gemcitabine group.In this trial 342 patients received either FOLFIRINOX or gemcitabine. The net chance of a better outcome favored strongly and significantly the FOLFIRINOX group (24.7; P<.001), suggesting a favorable benefit-risk balance of FOLFIRINOX versus gemcitabine. The positive benefit-risk balance of FOLFIRINOX was observed throughout all sensitivity analyses.Generalized pairwise comparisons are useful to perform a quantitative assessment of the benefit-risk balance of new treatments. It provides a clinically intuitive way of comparing patients with respect to all important efficacy and toxicity outcomes. Overall the benefit-risk balance of FOLFIRINOX was strongly positive.

Loading Institute Regional du Cancer Montpellier collaborators
Loading Institute Regional du Cancer Montpellier collaborators