Algiers, Algeria
Algiers, Algeria

Time filter

Source Type

Bounar-Kechih S.,Regional Veterinary Laboratory of Draa Ben Khedda | Hamdi T.M.,National Veterinary School of Algiers | Mezali L.,National Veterinary School of Algiers | Assaous F.,Institute Pasteur of Algeria | Rahal K.,Institute Pasteur of Algeria
Poultry Science | Year: 2012

This study aims at identifying serotypes and surveying the antimicrobial resistance and plasmid support of resistance of 100 Salmonella strains, which were isolated from 96 out of 506 (18.97%) samples taken from different production farms in the wilayas (i.e., Algerian states) of Tizi-Ouzou, Bouira, Bejaia, and Boumerdes in 2007. The highest percentage of Salmonella (48%) was recorded in Bouira. Thirteen serotypes were identified among the 100 Salmonella strains used in this study. The most prevalent ones were Salmonella Heidelberg (24%), Salmonella Enteritidis (20%), Salmonella Albany (16%), and Salmonella Typhimurium (9%). The strains showed resistance to 8 of the 34 antibiotics tested. Fifty-three percent of strains were resistant to at least one antibiotic, among which 15.09% were multiresistant. The most frequently observed resistance was to quinolones (58.49%), with a contribution of 94.74% of Salmonella Heidelberg resistant strains. The plasmid transfer performed on 53 strains showed that only 11 exhibited one or more markers of resistance, the most frequent being ampicillin, followed by tetracycline, then cotrimoxazole, sulphonamides, and kanamycin, in that order. The tetracycline characteristics were present in 72.72% of transconjugants, those of the β-lactams and sulphonamides in 27.27% each and those of the aminosides in 9.09%. The incompatibility groups of plasmids belong to the F1me and Com1 classes, and the molecular weight of the plasmid DNA was greater than 100 kb. The phenotypic and genotypic results indicate a clonal dissemination in the Gallus gallus species in this particular study; this phenomenon could generate resistant bacteria and transferable genes of resistance to humans. © 2012 Poultry Science Association Inc.


Rezig D.,Institute Pasteur Of Tunis | Fares W.,Institute Pasteur Of Tunis | Seghier M.,Institute Pasteur of Algeria | Yahia A.B.,Institute Pasteur Of Tunis | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Medical Virology | Year: 2011

Among Coxsackie B viruses, Coxsckievirus B5 is one of the most predominant serotypes in human, it is frequently associated with cases of neurological diseases, epidemics of meningitis and is a common cause of cardiomyopathy and diabetes. In the present study 27 isolates of Coxsackievirus B5 from North Africa, obtained from cerebrospinal fluid and stool samples of healthy individuals, patients with acute flaccid paralysis or aseptic meningitis were investigated by partial sequencing in the 5' half of the VP1 region and compared to the up-to-date published Coxsackievirus B5 sequences in the same genomic region. Four distinct genomic groups and ten different clusters were individualized. Most of the isolates from Algeria and Tunisia belonged to two clusters. For both, the sequences from North Africa clustered mainly with sequences from European countries, the majority isolated recently during the 2000s. The analysis of the alignment of amino-acids sequences in the VP1 gene revealed four major substitutions in strains from different clusters, we also noticed changes in the BC-loop region; this region is associated with viral antigenicity. This study permit to better identify circulating Coxsackievirus B5 strains throughout the world and their genetic relationship. The protein analysis showed changes that could imply some antigenic significance. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.


Abdelkhalek I.,University of Carthage | Seghier M.,Institute Pasteur of Algeria | Yahia A.B.,Institute Pasteur Of Tunis | Yahia A.B.,Tunis el Manar University | And 8 more authors.
Archives of Virology | Year: 2015

Coxsackievirus type B1 (CVB1) has emerged globally as the predominant enterovirus serotype and is associated with epidemics of meningitis and chronic diseases. In this report, the phylogeny of CVB1 was studied based on the VP1 sequences of 11 North African isolates and 81 published sequences. All CVB1 isolates segregated into four distinct genogroups and 10 genotypes. Most of the identified genotypes of circulating CVB1 strains appear to have a strict geographical specificity. The North African strains were of a single genotype and probably evolved distinctly. Using a relaxed molecular clock model and three different population models (constant population, exponential growth and Bayesian skyline demographic models) in coalescent analysis using the BEAST program, the substitution rate in CVB1 varied between 6.95 × 10−3 and 7.37 × 10−3 substitutions/site/year in the VP1 region. This study permits better identification of circulating CVB1, which has become one of the most predominant enterovirus serotypes in humans. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Wien.


PubMed | Institute Pasteur of Algeria, University of Carthage and Institute Pasteur Of Tunis
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Archives of virology | Year: 2015

Coxsackievirus type B1 (CVB1) has emerged globally as the predominant enterovirus serotype and is associated with epidemics of meningitis and chronic diseases. In this report, the phylogeny of CVB1 was studied based on the VP1 sequences of 11 North African isolates and 81 published sequences. All CVB1 isolates segregated into four distinct genogroups and 10 genotypes. Most of the identified genotypes of circulating CVB1 strains appear to have a strict geographical specificity. The North African strains were of a single genotype and probably evolved distinctly. Using a relaxed molecular clock model and three different population models (constant population, exponential growth and Bayesian skyline demographic models) in coalescent analysis using the BEAST program, the substitution rate in CVB1 varied between 6.95 10(-3) and 7.37 10(-3) substitutions/site/year in the VP1 region. This study permits better identification of circulating CVB1, which has become one of the most predominant enterovirus serotypes in humans.


PubMed | Institute Pasteur of Algeria
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of infection in developing countries | Year: 2016

Pertussis outbreaks continue to occur in many countries despite high vaccination coverage. Under-diagnosed cases in adolescents and adults may result in increased transmission to infants, who are at risk of severe pertussis. Additional measures to protect both groups should be considered.Nasopharyngeal samples and sera were collected from patients and household contacts with clinically suspected pertussis. Diagnoses were confirmed by culture, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and serology. Bordetella pertussis isolates were characterized by antimicrobial sensitivity and fimbrial serotyping.Of 392 participants, 134/248 patients (54%) and 66/144 contacts (45.8%) had confirmed pertussis infections. B. parapertussis was not detected. All B. pertussis isolates were sensitive to the antibiotics tested, and all expressed the Fim3, not the Fim2, fimbrial serotype. Most patients (81.2%) were <6 months (51.8% of whom were <3 months) of age; 77.6% were unvaccinated, and most positive contacts were mothers 20-40 years of age.Despite high vaccination coverage, pertussis is circulating in Algeria. Most infections occur in unvaccinated infants <6 months of age, with mothers as the main source of infection. An adolescent/adult booster should be considered. Adoption of sensitive and specific laboratory tests would improve pertussis diagnosis and surveillance.

Loading Institute Pasteur of Algeria collaborators
Loading Institute Pasteur of Algeria collaborators