Institute Oncologic del Valles IOV

Barcelona, Spain

Institute Oncologic del Valles IOV

Barcelona, Spain
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Katz A.,Flushing Radiation Oncology | Ferrer M.,IMIM Hospital del Mar Research Institute | Ferrer M.,CIBER ISCIII | Ferrer M.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | And 38 more authors.
Radiation Oncology | Year: 2012

Background: As the long-term efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) becomes established and other prostate cancer treatment approaches are refined and improved, examination of quality of life (QOL) following prostate cancer treatment is critical in driving both patient and clinical treatment decisions. We present the first study to compare QOL after SBRT and radical prostatectomy, with QOL assessed at approximately the same times pre- and post-treatment and using the same validated QOL instrument.Methods: Patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with either radical prostatectomy (n = 123 Spanish patients) or SBRT (n = 216 American patients). QOL was assessed using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) grouped into urinary, sexual, and bowel domains. For comparison purposes, SBRT EPIC data at baseline, 3 weeks, 5, 11, 24, and 36 months were compared to surgery data at baseline, 1, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Differences in patient characteristics between the two groups were assessed using Chi-squared tests for categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were constructed for each EPIC scale to account for correlation among repeated measures and used to assess the effect of treatment on QOL.Results: The largest differences in QOL occurred in the first 1-6 months after treatment, with larger declines following surgery in urinary and sexual QOL as compared to SBRT, and a larger decline in bowel QOL following SBRT as compared to surgery. Long-term urinary and sexual QOL declines remained clinically significantly lower for surgery patients but not for SBRT patients.Conclusions: Overall, these results may have implications for patient and physician clinical decision making which are often influenced by QOL. These differences in sexual, urinary and bowel QOL should be closely considered in selecting the right treatment, especially in evaluating the value of non-invasive treatments, such as SBRT. © 2012 Katz et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Casas F.,Hospital Clinic Of Barcelona | Leon C.,Institute Oncologic Del Valles IOV | Jovell E.,Research Service | Gomez J.,Institute Oncologic Del Valles IOV | And 9 more authors.
Clinical and Translational Oncology | Year: 2012

Aims The aim of this study was to assess the impact of adapted ice cream as a dietary supplement on the quality of life (QLQ) of malnourished patients with cancer. Material and methods We present an exploratory prospective observational study comparing two patterns of nutrition in cancer patients admitted during the study period who presented malnutrition disorders: adapted ice cream (Group I: 39 patients) and nutritional supplements (Group II: 31 patients). Patients were selected from two different hospitals from the same Oncologic Institute. QLQ was evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and QLQ of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ C30). Nutrition was determined by the PG-SGA test. Results HADS showed signifi cant differences in anxiety (p=0.023) and depression (p=0.011) at the end of the study only in Group I. QLQ-C30 revealed statistically signifi cant differences in baseline measures of global dimension between the two groups (Group I: 40.64-56.36 CI; Group II: 25.70-43.11 CI; p=0.017). Differences were also present in the social dimension (Group I: 77.42-93.51 CI; Group II: 55.85-82.85 CI; p=0.039). Statistically signifi cant differences were observed between the two groups at the end of the study in the global scale: Group I had 49.36-63.88 CI and Group II had 33.05-51.88 CI (p=0.016), and in the fatigue scale: Group I had 36.19-53.83 CI and Group II had mean=65.87, 52.50-79.23 CI (p=0.007). Conclusions The administration of ice cream could cover, in part, the social aspect of food and improve QLQ in malnourished cancer patients. These results are encouraging and deserve further confirmation.


Arenas M.,Rovira i Virgili University | Arguis M.,Rovira i Virgili University | Diez-Presa L.,Rovira i Virgili University | Henriquez I.,Rovira i Virgili University | And 8 more authors.
Brachytherapy | Year: 2015

Purpose: Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the commonest cancer in humans. NMSC treatment currently includes surgery, radiation therapy, and topical approaches. The objective was to analyze and compare the outcomes, toxicity, and cosmesis of NMSC treated by two hypofractionated high-dose-rate (HDR) plesiotherapy techniques. Methods and Materials: A retrospective institutional clinical study of 134 basal cell or squamous cell skin carcinomas treated at Radiation Oncology Department. Lesions were treated from November 2006 to December 2011 with a moderate hypofractionated HDR plesiotherapy using a fixed applicator or a customized mold. Results: After a median follow-up of 33 months, overall disease-free survival at 3 and 5 years was 95.12% and 93.36%, respectively. For Leipzig applicator, disease-free survival at 3 years was 94.9% and 94.9% at 5 years, for customized mold was 93.1% at 3 years and 88% at 5 years. Complete regression was achieved in 98% of lesions. Two lesions persisted after treatment; both had been treated by a Leipzig applicator. Six lesions suffered local recurrence (five Leipzig applicators and three molds, p = 0.404). Grade <2 acute toxicity noted in 57.3% of patients. Only 2.2% of lesions had Grade 4 acute toxicity. Borderline significant increase of toxicity was associated with customized molds (p = 0.067). Larger tumors were associated with higher acute skin toxicity. The cosmesis outcomes were excellent or good in 82% of patients, fair in 13%, and not available in 5%. Conclusions: Hypofractionated HDR plesiotherapy is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for NMSC with different toxicity levels depending on the plesiotherapy technique used. © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society.


PubMed | Hospital Clinic Barcelona, Rovira i Virgili University, Institute Oncologic del Valles IOV and Complejo Hospitalario Universitario Of Albacete Chua
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Brachytherapy | Year: 2015

Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the commonest cancer in humans. NMSC treatment currently includes surgery, radiation therapy, and topical approaches. The objective was to analyze and compare the outcomes, toxicity, and cosmesis of NMSC treated by two hypofractionated high-dose-rate (HDR) plesiotherapy techniques.A retrospective institutional clinical study of 134 basal cell or squamous cell skin carcinomas treated at Radiation Oncology Department. Lesions were treated from November 2006 to December 2011 with a moderate hypofractionated HDR plesiotherapy using a fixed applicator or a customized mold.After a median follow-up of 33 months, overall disease-free survival at 3 and 5 years was 95.12% and 93.36%, respectively. For Leipzig applicator, disease-free survival at 3 years was 94.9% and 94.9% at 5 years, for customized mold was 93.1% at 3 years and 88% at 5 years. Complete regression was achieved in 98% of lesions. Two lesions persisted after treatment; both had been treated by a Leipzig applicator. Six lesions suffered local recurrence (five Leipzig applicators and three molds, p = 0.404). Grade <2 acute toxicity noted in 57.3% of patients. Only 2.2% of lesions had Grade 4 acute toxicity. Borderline significant increase of toxicity was associated with customized molds (p = 0.067). Larger tumors were associated with higher acute skin toxicity. The cosmesis outcomes were excellent or good in 82% of patients, fair in 13%, and not available in 5%.Hypofractionated HDR plesiotherapy is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for NMSC with different toxicity levels depending on the plesiotherapy technique used.

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