Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Shiny K.S.,Institute of Wood Science and Technology IWST | Remadevi O.K.,Institute of Wood Science and Technology IWST
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products | Year: 2014

Among several factors leading to biodegradation of wood, termites are one of the most damaging agents to wooden structures worldwide. To avoid environmental pollution and health problems caused by the use of synthetic pesticides, wood preservation research is currently focusing on discovery and application of termiticides derived from plants. This paper reports and discusses the use of coconut shell oil (CSO) as a potential termiticide. Termiticidal activity of CSO was assessed and compared to wood preservatives currently in use. After 18 months of field trial, all the control stakes were destroyed completely and there was damage of 34.2 % in the CSO brush coated stakes. CSO is a promising new biodegradable compound which can be utilized for the development of a termiticide of biological origin. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Shiny K.S.,Institute of Wood Science and Technology IWST | Remadevi O.K.,Institute of Wood Science and Technology IWST | Nagaveni H.C.,Institute of Wood Science and Technology IWST | Vijayalakshmi G.,Institute of Wood Science and Technology IWST
International Wood Products Journal | Year: 2014

Antifungal activity of coconut shell pyrolytic oil against wood decay fungi was explored. Poisoned food technique was employed to indicate the antifungal effect of coconut shell pyrolytic oil against wood decay fungi. The results indicate that there was 81·5% inhibition on the growth of Polyporus sanguineus (L.)G. Mey, (white rot) and 90% inhibition on the growth of Tyromyces palustris (Berk M & A Curtis) (brown rot) at a concentration of 0·25%. This can be attributed to high phenolic content of coconut shell pyrolytic oil. © 2014 IWSc, the Wood Technology Society of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining. Source

Discover hidden collaborations