Hertford, United Kingdom

Institute of the Motor Industry

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Hertford, United Kingdom
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The latest advances in motoring technology provide important benefits, giving drivers alerts about vehicle faults and servicing as well as insight into vehicle performance.  However, as the latest data from motor industry professional body, the Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI) suggests, many drivers and passengers are unaware of the security risks of today's connected vehicles. 50% of people surveyed by the IMI said they aren't aware that their car is open to cyber-attacks, much like a home computer, and in fact can be controlled and stolen using Wi-Fi technology by anyone accessing the onboard computer systems. However, 51% of respondents said that they do fear their car being accessed and controlled by a hacker.  Almost the same proportion of drivers and passengers also said they were concerned that their car could be stolen using Wi-Fi technology. A key factor in ensuring the security of automotive data is knowing that the technicians working on a vehicle are properly qualified and adhere to a professional standard.  This is probably why 86% of people surveyed by the IMI believe vehicle technicians should be qualified and regulated to carry out repairs. Steve Nash FIMI, Chief Executive at the IMI, said: "Computer diagnostics are becoming commonplace in the motor industry today but the bulk of the work in servicing is still of a mechanical nature. The technological revolution in the automotive sector is shifting and broadening the skills needed by a maintenance technician to that of a systems analyst. "With the sector currently unregulated and no national standards in place it's not always possible to track the people who may have access to our personal information. Car technology will continue to develop which means it's more important than ever that vehicle technicians have not only the mechanical skills but the ICT skills to be able to service and maintain these vehicles in the safest possible way with an acute awareness of their legal and ethical responsibilities when accessing vehicle data." In a study commissioned by the IMI in 2016, Professor Jim Saker at Loughborough University, said: "One of the major issues being addressed within the industry is that of cyber security within cars. The ability to influence the running of a vehicle remotely is available now, and the potential for criminal activity utilising vehicles is yet to have been fully exploited. "Vehicle technicians have access to all of the cars operating systems and data communication portals. Under the current regulatory arrangements, there is no registration of technicians, no security checks and no tests of competence." IMI is the professional association for individuals working in the motor industry, and the authoritative voice of the sector. IMI is transforming the automotive industry by setting, upholding and promoting professional standards - driving skills acquisition, establishing clearer career paths, and boosting public confidence. IMI's online Professional Register is here to make sure consumers are in skilled, competent and trustworthy hands. Please visit http://www.theimi.org.uk to find out more.


News Article | April 5, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

The diesel-fuelled air pollution crisis should be solved by making motor companies recall and upgrade the dirty cars they sold, experts said on Wednesday. Current UK plans are focused on making diesel drivers pay to enter cities and a possible taxpayer-funded scrappage scheme. But both the German and French governments have already required that manufacturers including Volkswagen, Opel, Audi, Mercedes and Renault fix over a million diesel vehicles which were spewing far higher levels of toxic pollution on the road than in official tests. “The polluter should be paying, not the consumer and not the taxpayer. But the UK is doing nothing,” said Greg Archer, at NGO Transport & Environment and a former UK government air pollution expert. “If the car industry was required to recall those vehicles and upgrade the after-treatment system that would make a sizeable difference to the air pollution problems in our cities.” “We wouldn’t need to pay for a scrappage scheme,” he added. “It is time for the [manufacturers] who caused the problem to pay for the problem.” This solution is also backed by ClientEarth, the environmental law firm that has twice defeated ministers at the high court over the government’s illegally poor air pollution plans. “The prime minister must get on the side of ordinary car drivers and stand up to the car industry by committing to a programme of mandatory vehicle recall, compensation, random on-road testing and a clean-car label based on real-world emissions,” said ClientEarth chief executive James Thornton. More than 35,000 VW owners have joined a class action lawsuit for compensation VW, following the lack of government action. Air pollution causes 40,000 early deaths a year in the UK and the courts have forced the government to come up with a new plan, which is expected in the next fortnight. The likelihood of charges being levied on diesel drivers entering cities and towns around the country has led to concerns that owners, encouraged by past tax breaks to buy diesel cars, will now be penalised. Theresa May said on Tuesday: “I’m very conscious of the fact that past governments have encouraged people to buy diesel cars and we need to take that into account when we’re looking at what we do in the future.” However, the government faces difficult choices. “Toxin charges” on dirty diesels entering cities, such as the £10 fee being levied in central London from October, would be highly effective in cutting pollution but are politically sensitive. A scrappage scheme has significant support but would be expensive for taxpayers and might actually cut very little pollution. “Scrappage schemes don’t work, because the people that can afford to buy brand new cars are not the ones driving about in [polluting] ones more than 10 years old,” said Archer. “Also, we should not be rewarding the car industry by boosting sales.” A scrappage scheme, where owners of older, dirtier diesels would get a few thousand pounds to scrap their car and buy a newer, cleaner one, is supported by the Mayor of London Sadiq Khan, MP’s select committees, environmental groups and some business and motoring organisations. “Whilst it makes sense to steer car owners away from diesel, it currently seems all about putting cost on them rather than accepting some of the financial burden centrally,” said Steve Nash, CEO of the Institute of the Motor Industry. “A scrappage scheme, or some other form of incentive to soften the cost of change, would be fairer and help to accelerate the process.” But other motoring organisations are deeply sceptical, noting that a nationwide scrappage scheme would not target the urban areas where air pollution is a problem and that many polluting diesel cars are relatively new, and so very expensive to scrap. Steve Gooding, director of the RAC Foundation said: “Our analysis shows that it is much easier to call for a diesel scrappage scheme than it is to design one that delivers a good air quality outcome for a sensible cost.” Tamzen Isacsson, at the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT), which represents the UK motor industry said: “While the SMMT supports fleet renewal in principle, any scheme would have to deliver value for money for the public and must therefore be developed carefully.” The government itself ruled out a diesel scrappage scheme in September, responding to a call from the environment select committee of MPs: “There is no proportionate way to appropriately target such a measure to the areas where it would be most needed and, as such, it would not be an effective use of significant resources.” Government sources suggest a nationwide diesel scrappage scheme could cost billions of pounds. On Tuesday, the European parliament backed tougher rules for regulating vehicle emissions, including €30,000 per vehicle fines for manufacturers that flout rules. It stopped short of supporting an independent, EU-wide regulator to replace the national ones that failed to prevent the “dieselgate”’ scandal prompted by VW’s cheating of the tests. But Elżbieta Bieńkowska, the European Union’s industry commissioner, said: “Diesel will not disappear from one day to another. But I am quite sure they will disappear much faster than we can imagine.” The mayors of Paris, Madrid and Athens have already signalled a future ban on diesel vehicles. In February, the UK’s transport secretary warned that drivers considering buying a diesel vehicle “should take a long, hard think”.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: cleantechnica.com

In conversations with city employees about a swift transition to EVs, I listen to the feedback about the mechanics, the technicians that work on city-owned vehicles. They are not accustomed to EVs, but it is time to train them to become experts. That is what Mitsubishi is doing — in the UK. All technicians will receive IMI (Institute of the Motor Industry) qualifications in electric and hybrid vehicles. Mitsubishi Motors recently delivered its first IMI Level 3 course in Electric and Hybrid Vehicle, and now the company is serious about getting its service people up to speed on this fast-growing tech. “The Level 3 course — one of the highest levels in the suite of electric and hybrid vehicle IMI courses that have been developed to educate everyone from valeters to sales advisors, roadside patrols to master technicians — will now be delivered as standard to all Mitsubishi technicians within the Service and Maintenance level of their Pathway,” the company writes. Developing the skills required to work safely in and around a vehicle’s high- and low-voltage electrical system and electric drivetrain systems are essential skills that no technician should lack in today’s transition to a zero-emissions vehicle world. “The training has evolved from what was originally a one-day technical overview course introduced on the UK launch of the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV in 2014, to now be a three-day course incorporating online and practical examinations. On passing the training, Mitsubishi Technicians will have an industry-recognized qualification to work on Mitsubishi vehicles, as well as other Electric and Hybrid Vehicles on the road. “The IMI Qualifications are the culmination of 12 months of preparation by the Mitsubishi Training Academy, including its Technical Trainers – Gary Preece, Jeff Mills and Gary Found – being themselves independently assessed by the renowned industry organisation.” Ray Watts, Training Manager for Mitsubishi Motors in the UK, said: “With IMI Qualifications we are working to provide our technicians with additional industry recognition and qualifications that set the benchmark in electric and hybrid vehicle repair and maintenance. It’s another illustration of how we’re investing in our people and franchise to ensure that we are able to deliver the best possible service.” Check out our new 93-page EV report. Join us for an upcoming Cleantech Revolution Tour conference! Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.


A new report commissioned by the Institute of the Motor Industry argues that the UK’s economy could be boosted by around £51 billion a year if the government was to make strategic investments into the country’s electric vehicle charging infrastructure and into relevant workforce training, according to reports. Relevant workforce training in this case refers to the training of automotive technicians, as the country is currently facing a shortage of technicians qualified/capable of working with emerging automotive technologies and modalities. The report also notes that up to 320,000 new jobs could be created by the aforementioned strategic investments. The author of the report, Professor Jim Saker of Loughborough University, commented: “The UK by the nature of its size and geography has a natural advantage in the rapid adoption of vehicles with the new power train technologies, but it is dependent on Government investment to pump prime this initiative.” “Without proper regulation a skills gap will emerge with only a limited number of technicians working in the franchised sector being able to service and repair new technology vehicles. If this trend is found to be true then it is likely that the independent sector of the retail automotive sector will decline. This will mean that the market will fail to open up and develop to the benefit of the UK economy.” Electric vehicles are powered by 600 volt battery units and pose a serious danger of death to untrained personnel. 81% of independent garages are struggling to recruit highly skilled technicians and the UK retail motor industry is failing to attract young people into technical roles; unless a proactive strategy is undertaken the UK will not be able to support the growth of future car technology safely. Saker suggests the government make it illegal for untrained technicians to work on electric and hybrid vehicles with a license to practice in order to drive investment in the necessary training. With only 1,000 technicians in the UK currently qualified with a Level 4 in Electric and Hybrid Car Maintenance, the Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI) believes it is likely that the potential benefits to the UK economy from this development will not be realized. The report is scheduled to be presented to a cross-party group of MPs on April 13th by Professor Jim Saker and Institute of the Motor Industry CEO Steve Nash.   Drive an electric car? Complete one of our short surveys for our next electric car report.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.   James Ayre 's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Ahead of the Autumn Statement this week a motor industry body is calling on the Government to make a £30m investment in specialist electric and hybrid vehicle training for thousands of maintenance and repair technicians in the independent retail sector. The Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI) believes the investment is crucial to support the public switch to ultra low emission vehicles (ULEV). The IMI says the Government will need to spend a proportion of the £600m it has set aside to promote the uptake of low emission vehicles, on the technical skills infrastructure across the whole UK. It says the £40 million already allocated to cities to meet air quality and emission targets, and the Chancellor's goal of every new car and van being ULEV by 2040 will not work in isolation. Research commissioned by the Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI), shows UK sales of electrified vehicles doubling since 2015, but despite this growth the number of qualified repairers in the UK remains at around 0.4% of the 250,000 mechanics working on cars and vans commercially. There are serious health and safety issues for unskilled mechanics attempting to work on machines with 600 volts coursing through them.  The IMI says sales growth will stall unless small repair businesses are helped to make the investment in skills needed to provide consumers with choice and value for money. It will mean ordinary working people will be priced out of the ULEV market. Insurance premiums for electrified vehicles* are already 30-50% higher than diesel cars because of the lack of qualified repairers. Over 90% of independent garages say they would need to retrain existing technicians to undertake work on these electrified vehicles; it's clear that unless there is a proactive strategy from the Government to encourage this training the UK will not be able to support the growth of future car technology. "There are currently around 1,000 people qualified to work on high voltage electrics and they all work for the vehicle manufacturers. "Without financial assistance, independent garages that make up 85% of the businesses operating in the service & repair sector will not invest in the training they need without certainty of a financial return. That means that their staff will either risk their lives working on unfamiliar systems that carry lethally high voltages, or they will simply refer everything back to the franchised dealers, reducing competition in the sector. I cannot imagine that either of those outcomes is likely to be palatable for the government" The IMI research, On the Road to Sustainable Growth, by Professor Jim Saker, has been presented to the DFT consultation on proposed ultra low emission vehicle measures for inclusion in the Modern Transport Bill. Notes to Editor: *Electrified cars refers to fully electric, plug in hybrid and hybrid vehicles. IMI is the professional body for individuals working in the motor industry, and the authoritative voice of the sector. IMI is transforming the automotive industry by setting, upholding and promoting professional standards - driving skills acquisition, establishing clearer career paths, and boosting public confidence.   IMI's online Professional Register is here to make sure consumers are in skilled, competent and trustworthy hands. Please visit http://www.theimi.org.uk to find out more.


« Elio Motors introduces E1c engineering vehicle | Main | S. Korean researchers develop new catalytic pathway for direct conversion of CO2 to liquid hydrocarbon fuels » In the UK, the Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI) is calling on the UK Government to make a £30-million (US$37-million) investment in specialist electric and hybrid vehicle training for thousands of maintenance and repair technicians in the independent retail sector. IMI asserts that the investment is crucial to support the public switch to ultra low emission vehicles (ULEV). The IMI says the Government will need to spend a proportion of the £600 million (US$815 million) it has set aside to promote the uptake of low emission vehicles, on the technical skills infrastructure across the whole UK. It says the £40 million (US$49 million) already allocated to cities to meet air quality and emission targets, and the Chancellor’s goal of every new car and van being ULEV by 2040 will not work in isolation. Research commissioned by IMI shows UK sales of electrified vehicles doubling since 2015, but despite this growth the number of qualified repairers in the UK remains at around 0.4% of the 250,000 mechanics working on cars and vans commercially. There are serious health and safety issues for unskilled mechanics attempting to work on machines with 600 volts coursing through them. The IMI says sales growth will stall unless small repair businesses are helped to make the investment in skills needed to provide consumers with choice and value for money. It will mean ordinary working people will be priced out of the ULEV market, the organization said. Insurance premiums for electrified vehicles are already 30-50% higher than diesel cars because of the lack of qualified repairers. More than 90% of independent garages say they would need to retrain existing technicians to undertake work on these electrified vehicles; IMI said that unless there is a proactive strategy from the Government to encourage this training, the UK will not be able to support the growth of future car technology. There are currently around 1,000 people qualified to work on high voltage electrics and they all work for the vehicle manufacturers. Without financial assistance, independent garages that make up 85% of the businesses operating in the service & repair sector will not invest in the training they need without certainty of a financial return. That means that their staff will either risk their lives working on unfamiliar systems that carry lethally high voltages, or they will simply refer everything back to the franchised dealers, reducing competition in the sector. I cannot imagine that either of those outcomes is likely to be palatable for the government. The IMI research, On the Road to Sustainable Growth, by Professor Jim Saker, has been presented to the DFT consultation on proposed ultra low emission vehicle measures for inclusion in the Modern Transport Bill. Among the findings of the report: The UK has 250,000 maintenance and repair technicians and only 1,000 technicians currently qualified at a Level 3 in Electric and Hybrid Car Maintenance. The overall economic and social benefit of EVs, connected and autonomous vehicles could be in the region of £51 billion (US$63 billion) per year by 2030. The nature and geographical structure of the UK presents the opportunity for the country to be world leading in the implementation of the new technologies. Government should commit to supporting the installation of 1,250 hydrogen refueling stations across the UK. Government should make it illegal for unregistered technicians to work initially on EV and FCEV cars from 2016 with the scheme being rolled out for all technicians by 2020.


« CMU team identifies IVOCs emissions from on-road gasoline vehicles and small off-road engines as important SOA precursors | Main | New ACE researchers propose new diesel combustion concept; pathway to >50% BTE without WHR » An independent academic report to be published on 13 April will urge the UK government to make significant investment in charging infrastructure and upskilling of the UK motor industry or risk missing out on major economic benefits in the future. The author of the report, Professor Jim Saker of Loughborough University, says that 320,000 jobs could be created and £51 billion (US$72 billion) per year generated into the UK economy if the Government acts strategically to make charging low emission cars convenient to drivers, and to make sure there are enough qualified people to service and repair them. The report, which was commissioned by the Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI), will be presented to a cross-party group of MPs on Wednesday 13 April by Professor Jim Saker and IMI CEO Steve Nash. They will highlight the need for the government to focus on protecting both the economic growth of the motor industry, and the safety concerns across the sector. Electric vehicles are powered by 600 volt battery units and pose a serious danger of death to untrained personnel. 81% of independent garages are struggling to recruit highly skilled technicians and the UK retail motor industry is failing to attract young people into technical roles; unless a proactive strategy is undertaken the UK will not be able to support the growth of future car technology safely. Saker suggests the government make it illegal for untrained technicians to work on electric and hybrid vehicles with a license to practice in order to drive investment in the necessary training. With only 1,000 technicians in the UK currently qualified with a Level 4 in Electric and Hybrid Car Maintenance, the Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI) believes it is likely that the potential benefits to the UK economy from this development will not be realized. Without proper regulation a skills gap will emerge with only a limited number of technicians working in the franchised sector being able to service and repair new technology vehicles. If this trend is found to be true then it is likely that the independent sector of the retail automotive sector will decline. This will mean that the market will fail to open up and develop to the benefit of the UK economy. Professor Jim Saker and the Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI) Chief Executive, Steve Nash, are hosting a meeting in Parliament on Wednesday April to discuss the report.


Lu F.,Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics | Lu F.,Institute of the Motor Industry | Huang J.,Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics | Lv Y.,Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Energies | Year: 2013

Different approaches for gas path performance estimation of dynamic systems are commonly used, the most common being the variants of the Kalman filter. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) method is a popular approach for nonlinear systems which combines the traditional Kalman filtering and linearization techniques to effectively deal with weakly nonlinear and non-Gaussian problems. Its mathematical formulation is based on the assumption that the probability density function (PDF) of the state vector can be approximated to be Gaussian. Recent investigations have focused on the particle filter (PF) based on Monte Carlo sampling algorithms for tackling strong nonlinear and non-Gaussian models. Considering the aircraft engine is a complicated machine, operating under a harsh environment, and polluted by complex noises, the PF might be an available way to monitor gas path health for aircraft engines. Up to this point in time a number of Kalman filtering approaches have been used for aircraft turbofan engine gas path health estimation, but the particle filters have not been used for this purpose and a systematic comparison has not been published. This paper presents gas path health monitoring based on the PF and the constrained extend Kalman particle filter (cEKPF), and then compares the estimation accuracy and computational effort of these filters to the EKF for aircraft engine performance estimation under rapid faults and general deterioration. Finally, the effects of the constraint mechanism and particle number on the cEKPF are discussed. We show in this paper that the cEKPF outperforms the EKF, PF and EKPF, and conclude that the cEKPF is the best choice for turbofan engine health monitoring. © 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Yao H.,Institute of the Motor Industry
Hangkong Dongli Xuebao/Journal of Aerospace Power | Year: 2011

Mathematical model for a turbo-shaft engine and actuator was developed by using Simulink simulation tools in this thesis. Control laws for turbo-shaft engine control system, such as steady-state, acceleration and deceleration, fault-tolerant for key sensor failure found out afterward, were studied in simulation. It presented a full solution scheme of turbo-shaft engine control. Simulation results show that, the solution scheme can assure control system works steadily and has better steady-state and dynamic performance features, where there is fault or not.


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