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Schawaller D.,Institute of Textile Chemistry and Chemical Fibers ITCF Denkendorf | Clauss B.,Institute of Textile Chemistry and Chemical Fibers ITCF Denkendorf | Buchmeiser M.R.,Institute of Textile Chemistry and Chemical Fibers ITCF Denkendorf | Buchmeiser M.R.,University of Stuttgart
Macromolecular Materials and Engineering | Year: 2012

Ceramic fibers are essential components of new high-temperature-resistant lightweight materials. The production routes of ceramic filament fibers are complex and in most cases polymeric components or structures are key factors for fiber spinning. Either organic polymers are used as additives in the spinning dopes for oxide ceramic fibers or inorganic polymers are the precursors for the production of non-oxide fibers. This paper gives an up-to-date overview about different ceramic fibers and the chemistry behind the fiber development and production. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Source


Frank E.,Institute of Textile Chemistry and Chemical Fibers ITCF Denkendorf | Hermanutz F.,Institute of Textile Chemistry and Chemical Fibers ITCF Denkendorf | Buchmeiser M.R.,Institute of Textile Chemistry and Chemical Fibers ITCF Denkendorf | Buchmeiser M.R.,University of Stuttgart
Macromolecular Materials and Engineering | Year: 2012

The properties, structure, and processing of carbon fibers are reviewed. Carbon fibers are made from several precursors, with PAN being the dominating precursor in the market. Carbon fibers have high tensile strength, high modulus (up to the theoretical limit of around 1000 GPa), and low density, depending on the structure and processing in very limited combinations. Both the structure and composition of the precursor affect the properties of the resulting carbon fibers significantly. Although the essential processes for carbon fiber production are similar, different precursors require different processing conditions in order to achieve improved performance. Future developments are discussed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Source


Zhang M.,University of Stuttgart | Zhang M.,Institute of Textile Chemistry and Chemical Fibers ITCF Denkendorf | Zhang M.,Robert Bosch GmbH | Denes I.,Robert Bosch GmbH | And 2 more authors.
Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics | Year: 2016

Thin silicone films for applications as dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) are fatigued under mechanical cycling (Wöhler tests) until rupture. The silicones are based on linear vinyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) cross-linked with tetrafunctional methylhydrosiloxane–dimethylsiloxane copolymer. Stoichiometric imbalance of the hydrosilane to vinyl groups is varied (1.3, 1.7, and 3). Complementary, all silicones are compounded with silicone oil (55 wt%) and silica (4.5 wt%). Changes in cross-linking density, elastic modulus, dielectric permittivity, and dielectric breakdown are examined. The fatigued specimens show increased cross-linking density due to mechanically induced secondary cross-linking of excessive hydrosilane groups. This leads to significant changes in the elastic modulus and permittivity of the material, which can negatively affect the performance of the DEAP device. The “critical loading conditions,” where the fatigued specimens show maximum changes in properties, are found to depend on excess hydrosilane content. (Figure presented.) . © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim Source

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