Institute of Tele and Radio Technology

Warsaw, Poland

Institute of Tele and Radio Technology

Warsaw, Poland

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Misnik M.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | Misnik M.,Technical University of Gdansk | Konarski P.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | Zawada A.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | Zawada A.,Military University of Technology
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms | Year: 2016

We present results of the use of metal and metal oxide substrates that serve as collectors in 'storing matter', the quantitative technique of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). This technique allows separating the two base processes of secondary ion formation in SIMS. Namely, the process of ion sputtering is separated from the process of ionisation. The technique allows sputtering of the analysed sample and storing the sputtered material, with sub-monolayer coverage, onto a collector surface. Such deposits can be then analysed by SIMS, and as a result, the so called 'matrix effects' are significantly reduced. We perform deposition of the sputtered material onto Ti and Cu substrates and also onto metal oxide substrates as molybdenum, titanium, tin and indium oxides. The process of sputtering is carried within the same vacuum chamber where the SIMS analysis of the collected material is performed. For sputtering and SIMS analysis of the deposited material we use 5 keV Ar+ beam of 500 nA. The presented results are obtained with the use of stationary collectors. Here we present a case study of chromium. The obtained results show that the molybdenum and titanium oxide substrates used as collectors increase useful yield by two orders, with respect to such pure elemental collectors as Cu and Ti. Here we define useful yield as a ratio of the number of detected secondary ions during SIMS analysis and the number of atoms sputtered during the deposition process. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Konarski P.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | Misnik M.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | Misnik M.,Technical University of Gdansk | Zawada A.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | And 2 more authors.
Surface and Interface Analysis | Year: 2014

The storing matter technique is applied in quadrupole type SIMS analyser. Its analytical chamber is additionally equipped with a specialmagnetically driven x, Θ, UHVmanipulator applied for transfer of the metal ring collector. The sample holder, horizontally positioned, carries the analysed sample as well as a watch like rotationmechanism carrying a continuously rotating collector of 1 inch diameter at a rate of 1 rev. per hour. The procedure includes cleaning of the collector with the ion beam, the collector reverse, sputter deposition of the analysed material from the sample onto the clean surface of the collector, reversal of the sample and analysis of the stored material. The whole procedure is performed in one analytical chamber, using a Physical Electronics 06-350E sputter ion gun and QMA-410 Balzers quadrupole mass analyser. The procedure is tested on pure chromium and is applied to an inconel alloy implanted with 120 keV Cr2+ and 145 keV Y2+. The SIMS results are obtained using 5 and 3 keV Ar+ ion beam at 45° incidence angle. As the collector, we use high purity titanium. The obtained depth profile analysis of the inconel alloy shows that the 'matrix effect' is largely reduced when compared with standard SIMS analysis. The storing matter procedure was performed with the use of oxygen flooding (during sputter deposition and during SIMS analysis). Results show significant improvement with respect to the use of this technique without oxygen flooding. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Konarski P.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | Misnik M.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | Misnik M.,Technical University of Gdansk | Zawada A.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | And 6 more authors.
Surface and Interface Analysis | Year: 2014

Advantage of using individual dust meters over traditional stationary particulate matter (PM) air pollution monitoring is evaluated. Data of air pollution levels obtained from the three municipal stationarymonitoring stationswere compared with data of individual dustmeters SidePak AM510. Results of a few control series of this comparison have indicated important differences between the mentioned two types of synchronised measurements. Taking into account that vast majority of time people spend indoors, one may expect that individual samplers better characterise exposition of any human being on the PM urban pollution. As a result, a new sampling procedure is proposed. It allows the collection of particulatematter in the immediate vicinity of human being: As collectors of the PM, we proposemobile phones, accompanying people whatever is their everyday activity. Namely, dust deposited in the inner parts of the used mobile phones is extracted and analysed. The procedure consists of bulk analysis performed with spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS) and depth profile analysis made by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Exemplary results are presented of the particulatematerial deposited on high purity indium foils. Ion erosion is done with 5keV Ar+, 150-μm diameter ion beam scanned over 2 × 2.5mm area. The analyser is equipped with Physical Electronics ion gun and QMA-410 Balzers quadrupole mass spectrometer. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Bagdasaryan A.A.,Sumy State University | Smirnova E.,Sumy State University | Konarski P.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | Misnik M.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | Zawada A.,Technical University of Gdansk
Journal of Nano- and Electronic Physics | Year: 2014

The elemental and structural features of the nitride nanostructured coating produced by vacuum arc evaporation from high-entropy cathode TiHfVNbZr were studied. Using of the complementary methods of elemental analysis (RBS, SIMS and GDMS) allowed to carry out a comprehensive analysis of the elemental composition, namely to determine the chemical composition of the surface layer, to establish the characteristics of the distribution of elements in depth and to identify uncontrollable impurities. © 2014 Sumy State University.


Konarski P.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | Krol K.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | Krol K.,Warsaw University of Technology | Misnik M.,Institute of Tele and Radio Technology | And 4 more authors.
Acta Physica Polonica A | Year: 2015

Secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profile analyses were performed on two sets of 4H-SiC(0001) substrate samples implanted with phosphorus. Both sets were processed under the same conditions. We implanted the samples with 100 keV (1011-1014 cm-2) phosphorus ions through the thin chemical vapor deposition deposited silicon dioxide stopping mask in order to obtain an ultra-shallow implantation profile. After phosphorus implantation, secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profile analysis was performed on the first set of samples and the second set was subjected to thermal oxidation procedure at 1200 °C in order to create a dielectric layer. The aim of the oxidation process was formation of the silicon dioxide layer enriched with phosphorus: The element, which is considered to be suitable for trap density reduction. Ion implantation parameters as well as oxidation and chemical etching procedures were examined for the proper incorporation of phosphorus into the subsurface structure of the silicon oxide. Secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profile analysis was performed with Physical Electronics 06-350E sputter ion gun and QMA-410 Balzers quadrupole mass analyser. The analytical parameters such as: 1.7 keV Ar+ ion beam digitally scanned over 3 × 3 mm2 area and ion erosion rate of 1.4 nm/min and sampling rate of 0.3 nm, were suitable for samples oxidized after ion implantation.

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