Time filter

Source Type

Zheng M.,University of Sydney | Rangan A.,University of Sydney | Olsen N.J.,Copenhagen University | Andersen L.B.,Institute of Sport science and Clinical Biomechanics | And 9 more authors.
Nutrition | Year: 2015

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the association between different types of beverage intake and substitution of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) by water, milk, or 100% fruit juice in relation to 6-y change in body fatness. Methods: A cohort of 9-y-old children (N = 358) who participated in the Danish part of the European Youth Heart Study was followed for development of body fatness over 6 y. Multivariate linear regression was used to examine the associations between beverage intake at baseline and change in body fatness (body mass index z score [BMIz]), waist circumference (WC), and sum of four skinfolds (σ4SF) over 6 y with adjustment for potential confounders. Substitution models were used to evaluate various beverages as alternatives to SSBs. Results: SSB intake at age 9 y, but not intake of other beverages, was directly associated with subsequent 6-y changes in BMIz (β = 0.05; P = 0.02) and σ4SF (β = 0.86; P = 0.02). Daily substitution of 100 g waterfor 100 g SSB was inversely associated with changes in BMIz (β = -0.04; P= 0.02), WC (β =-0.29; P = 0.04), and σ4SF (β = -0.91; P = 0.02) over 6 y. Daily substitution of 100 g milk for 100 g SSB was also inversely associated with changes in BMIz (β = -0.05; P = 0.02), WC (β = -0.33; P = 0.046), and σ4SF (β = -0.79; P = 0.06). No effect was observed for substitution of SSB by 100% fruit juice. Conclusion: Our results suggest that SSB intake is associated with long-term changes in body fatness in children, and replacing SSBs with water or milk, but not 100% fruit juice, is inversely associated with body fatness development. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


Zheng M.,University of Sydney | Rangan A.,University of Sydney | Olsen N.J.,Copenhagen University | Bo Andersen L.,Institute of Sport science and Clinical Biomechanics | And 9 more authors.
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition | Year: 2014

Background/Objectives: In parallel with the obesity epidemic, consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) has risen over the same period. Our aim was to investigate associations between the consumption of SSB in childhood and adolescence with subsequent changes in body fatness in early adulthood. Subjects/Methods: A longitudinal study of 9-year-old children (n=283) enrolled in the Danish part of the European Youth Heart Study with a 6-year and 12-year follow-up. Data were collected at ages 9, 15 and 21 years. Multivariate regression analyses with adjustment for potential confounders were used to evaluate the effect of SSB consumption at 9 and 15 years and change in SSB consumption from 9-15 years on subsequent change in body fatness until 21 years. Results: Subjects who consumed more than one serve of SSB daily at age 15 years had larger increases in body mass index (BMI) (β=0. 92, P=0. 046) and waist circumference (WC) (β=2. 69, P=0. 04) compared to non-consumers over the subsequent 6 years. In addition, subjects who increased their SSB consumption from age 9-15 years also had larger increases in BMI (β=0. 91, P=0. 09) and WC (β=2. 72, P=0. 04) from 15-21 years, compared to those who reported no change in consumption. No significant association was observed from 9-21 years. Conclusion: This study provides new evidence that SSB consumption in adolescence and changes in SSB consumption from childhood to adolescence are both significant predictors of change in body fatness later in early adulthood. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


PubMed | University of Sydney, University of Southern Denmark, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Copenhagen University and Institute of Sport science and Clinical Biomechanics
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of clinical nutrition | Year: 2014

In parallel with the obesity epidemic, consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) has risen over the same period. Our aim was to investigate associations between the consumption of SSB in childhood and adolescence with subsequent changes in body fatness in early adulthood.A longitudinal study of 9-year-old children (n=283) enrolled in the Danish part of the European Youth Heart Study with a 6-year and 12-year follow-up. Data were collected at ages 9, 15 and 21 years. Multivariate regression analyses with adjustment for potential confounders were used to evaluate the effect of SSB consumption at 9 and 15 years and change in SSB consumption from 9-15 years on subsequent change in body fatness until 21 years.Subjects who consumed more than one serve of SSB daily at age 15 years had larger increases in body mass index (BMI) (=0.92, P=0.046) and waist circumference (WC) (=2.69, P=0.04) compared to non-consumers over the subsequent 6 years. In addition, subjects who increased their SSB consumption from age 9-15 years also had larger increases in BMI (=0.91, P=0.09) and WC (=2.72, P=0.04) from 15-21 years, compared to those who reported no change in consumption. No significant association was observed from 9-21 years.This study provides new evidence that SSB consumption in adolescence and changes in SSB consumption from childhood to adolescence are both significant predictors of change in body fatness later in early adulthood.


Grontved A.,Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics | Ried-Larsen M.,Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics | Ekelund U.,Norwegian School of Sport Sciences | Ekelund U.,Institute of Metabolic Science | And 5 more authors.
Diabetes Care | Year: 2013

OBJECTIVE-To examine the independent and combined association of isometric muscle strength of the abdomen and back and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in youth with indices of glucose metabolism in young adulthood among boys and girls from the European Youth Heart Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-We used data from a population-based prospective cohort study among youth followed up for up to 12 years (n = 317). In youth, maximal voluntary contractions during isometric back extension and abdominal flexion were determined using a strain-gauge dynamometer and CRF was obtained from a maximal cycle ergometer test. Insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) and β-cell function (homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function [HOMA-B]) were estimated from fasting serum insulin and glucose that were obtained in youth and at follow-up in young adulthood. RESULTS-For each 1-SD difference in isometric muscle strength (0.16 N/kg) in youth, fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-B in young adulthood changed by -11.3% (95% CI -17.0 to -5.2), -12.2% (-18.2 to -5.7), and -8.9% (-14.4 to -3.0), respectively, in young adulthood after adjustment for CRF and personal lifestyle and demographic factors. Results for CRF were very similar in magnitude, and the magnitude of associations for both exposures was unchanged with additional adjustment for general or abdominal adiposity in youth. Combined associations of muscle strength and CRF with fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-B were additive, and adolescents in the highest sex-specific tertile for both isometric muscle strength and CRF had the lowest levels of these glucose metabolism outcomes. CONCLUSIONS-Increasing muscle strength and CRF should be targets in youth primordial prevention strategies of insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. © 2013 by the American Diabetes Association.

Loading Institute of Sport science and Clinical Biomechanics collaborators
Loading Institute of Sport science and Clinical Biomechanics collaborators