Stirling, United Kingdom
Stirling, United Kingdom

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Palmer-Green D.,University of Nottingham | Elliott N.,Sport Scotland Institute of Sport
British Journal of Sports Medicine | Year: 2015

Results: Among the 56 TeamGB athletes, there were 27 injuries and 11 illnesses during the Olympic Games period. This equated to 39% sustaining at least one injury and 18% at least one illness, with an incidence of 48.2 injuries and 19.6 illnesses per 100 athletes, respectively. Of all injuries and illnesses, 9% and 7%, respectively, resulted in time loss. The risk of sustaining an injury was highest for freestyle skiing, skeleton and snowboarding; and lowest for curling, biathlon and Alpine skiing (with no reported injuries); with the lower limb being the most commonly injured location. Respiratory system illnesses were most frequently reported overall, and older female athletes were the ones most affected by illness.Conclusions: The risk of injury was double the risk of illness for TeamGB athletes. Overall, the rate of time-loss issues was low. Methodological considerations are important when interpreting data, and prevention strategies should focus on those issues causing the greatest risk, in terms of prevalence and severity, to athlete health and performance.Background: Sports injury and illness surveillance is the first step in injury and illness prevention, and is important for the protection of both athlete health and performance in major competitions.Aim: To identify the prevalence, severity nature and causes of athlete injuries and illnesses in the Great Britain Olympic Team (TeamGB) during the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games.Methods: The observational prospective cohort study followed the Great Britain Injury/Illness Performance Project surveillance methodology and obtained information on injuries and illnesses that occurred during the Games between 30 January and 23 February 2014 in TeamGB athletes (n=56).


PubMed | Sport Scotland Institute Of Sport
Type: | Journal: The Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness | Year: 2015

Supplemental oxygen use may offer recovery benefits to team sport athletes both in training and match play. A blinded independent measures study was used to investigate the effect of supplementary oxygen use during recovery from high-intensity exercise on performance.Fifteen female international hockey players underwent a 6 week running based training programme with a 2:1 work to rest ratio. The subjects were split into 3 groups; normobaric hyperoxia (HXA), normoxia (NXA) and control (CTR). In between exercise sets HXA received 100% oxygen for 1 min whilst NXA received a placebo in the same manner. CTR received no treatment and were not supervised. Maximal aerobic speed (MAS) was measured pre and post. Distance covered was measured along with peak heart rate (HRPeak), peak blood lactate concentration ([La-] Peak) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE).MAS improved in HXA, NXA and CTR. However, distance ran in training was not different between groups. There was a likely positive effect on HRPeak in HXA (lower in HXA). RPE and [La-] Peak response was not different between groups.Inhaling supplementary oxygen during recovery between high-intensity intervals did not improve physiological performance of high-level team sport players. The normobaric hyperoxia treatment had no effect on maximal aerobic (distance covered), metabolic ([La-]Peak), and perception (RPE) parameters. It is not recommended as an ergogenic aid to training at sea level.

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