Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

Southampton, United Kingdom

Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

Southampton, United Kingdom
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News Article | December 23, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Today, the Sacramento Kings announced Golden 1 Center, the world’s most technologically advanced sports and entertainment venue, will feature next-generation technology from Comhear, an industry leading an audio technology research and development company that works to bring people closer together through pristine communication, while enhancing the immersive entertainment experience. Golden 1 Center’s audio system will utilize MyBeam speaker arrays, the latest in audio technology from Comhear, to deliver the sounds of the game from court level into the suite level of the arena. The arena’s one-of-a-kind, industry leading Command Center – the hub for all arena data, information, and instantaneous decision making – will feature the technology as well. MyBeam™ 360°, an award-winning speaker technology, provides an enhanced natural HD 360 degree sound experience for virtual reality, gaming, desktop sound, theatre & theme park, and personal devices. In conjunction with researchers at UC San Diego, Comhear has produced a new way to present immersive audio experiences with a new technology called “audio-beam forming. “By using this technology, fans will be able to hear the players running up the court, the ball dribbling, and the plays from coaches in a new and exciting way,” said Comhear CEO Perry Teevens. “Golden 1 Center’s advanced features, impressive food selection, innovative design create an unmatched fan experience,” said Kings President Chris Granger. “Using technology like the Comhear MyBeam™ system allows immerses fans in the sounds of the game like never before, enhancing the way guests interact and engage with the team." Basic MyBeam technology operates in several modes: multi-beam (for multiple languages), virtual surround (trans-aural or binaural rendering on speakers), and speech enhancement. Three years of partnership with UCSD’s Qualcomm Institute (QI), along with the University of Southampton’s Institute of Sound and Vibration Research (ISVR), has created a rich set of innovative capabilities. Comhear believes in sound that moves you. Comhear is an audio technology company that brings people closer together through pristine communication, and enhances immersive entertainment with the physical sensation of sound you can practically touch. Consumer electronics speaker and headset OEMs, enterprise TEMs, kiosk systems manufacturers and integrators and Gaming/VR platforms benefit from Comhear’s revolutionary beamforming services, which add vocal clarity and customization to audio and conferencing systems. Comhear products are powered by our patented KAP™ software, which gives you wider, more natural soundscapes while protecting long term hearing acuity. This passion for healthy audio, combined with a deep understanding of how the brain processes sound, enables Comhear to develop products and solutions that adapt to your environment and transform the listening experience. Media Inquiries For interview or meeting requests, Please contact us at (619) 722-0639 or email at pr(at)comhear.com


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Scientists from the University of Southampton have found Arctic lakes, covered with ice during the winter months, are melting earlier each spring. The team, who monitored 13,300 lakes using satellite imagery, have shown that on average ice is breaking up one day earlier per year, based on a 14-year period between 2000 and 2013. Their findings are published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports. The researchers used information on how light is reflected off the lakes, as recorded by NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor, which collects a range of spectral and thermal data on a daily basis as it circles the globe on two satellites. This study used the changes in reflectance to identify the freezing and thawing processes. Southampton's Professor Jadu Dash, says: "Previous studies have looked into small numbers of lakes to show the impact of changes in temperature on the cyclic nature of lake-ice cover. However, ours is the first to use time-series of satellite data to monitor thousands of lakes in this way across the Arctic. It contributes to the growing range of observations showing the influence that warmer temperatures are having on the Arctic." The researchers discovered that all five study areas in the Arctic (Alaska, Northeast Siberia, Central Siberia, Northeast Canada and Northern Europe) showed significant trends of early ice break-up in the spring, but to varying degrees. Central Siberia demonstrated the strongest trend, with ice starting to break-up an average of 1.4 days earlier each year. Northern Europe showed the lowest change of ice break-up at 0.84 days earlier per year. They found a strong relationship between decreasing ice cover and an increasingly early spring temperature rise. The team also examined the timing of formation of ice cover on the lakes in late autumn. Although the use of satellite images wasn't possible due to the short daylight period limiting valid satellite observation, observations on the ground suggest lake freezing is starting later - further shortening the ice period, although more work would be needed to confirm this. Co-author Professor Mary Edwards, from the University of Southampton, comments "Our findings have several implications. Changing ice cover affects the energy balance between the land and atmosphere. Less ice means a longer season for lake biology, which together with warmer temperatures will affect processes such as CO2 and CH4 emissions. Furthermore, many people use ice-covered landscapes for winter transport, and so spring and autumn travel for commercial and subsistence activities is likely to be more and more affected." Professor Dash concludes: "This demonstrates the potential of routine satellite data for long term monitoring of physical changes on the Earth's surface. In the future, the new Sentinel series of satellites from the European Space Agency provide potential opportunities to examine these changes in greater detail." 1) For interview requests, please contact Peter Franklin, Media Relations, University of Southampton. Tel: 023 8059 5457 Email: p.franklin@southampton.ac.uk 2) A copy of the paper Arctic lakes show strong decadal trend in earlier spring ice-out (DOI: 10.1038/srep38449) can be found here http://www. or obtained from Media Relations on request. 3) Graphic image available from Media Relations showing the spatial distribution and magnitude of all significant trends of breakup start (BUS) and breakup end (BUE) for Central Siberia. Each dot represents a lake for which a statistically significant trend was observed. The colour value represents the magnitude of the trend (this figure was drawn using ESRI ArcMap). 4) For more about Geography at Southampton, please visit: http://www. 5) The University of Southampton is a leading UK teaching and research institution with a global reputation for leading-edge research and scholarship across a wide range of subjects in engineering, science, social sciences, health and humanities. With over 24,000 students, 6500 staff, and an annual turnover in excess of £550m, the University of Southampton is acknowledged as one of the country's top institutions for engineering, computer science and medicine. We combine academic excellence with an innovative and entrepreneurial approach to research, supporting a culture that engages and challenges students and staff in their pursuit of learning. The University is also home to a number of world-leading research centres including the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, the Optoelectronics Research Centre, the Institute for Life Sciences, the Web Science Trust and Doctoral training Centre, the Centre for the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, the Southampton Statistical Sciences Research Institute and is a partner of the National Oceanography Centre at the Southampton waterfront campus. http://www. Like us on Facebook: http://www.


News Article | November 4, 2015
Site: news.yahoo.com

A hand-held device that infuses a gentle stream of regular cold water with ultrasound to turn it into a highly effective cleaning tool has been developed by British scientists, who say it could reduce dependence on traditional detergents and help combat anti-microbial resistance. The device, known as Starstream, passes a gentle stream of water through a nozzle that generates ultrasound and bubbles. The oscillating effect of the sound field on the bubbles turns them into micro-scrubbers that can remove dirt and germs from most surfaces. These tiny micro-scrubbers are particularly effective at cleaning inside cracks and crevices that are difficult for conventional cleaning technologies, according to co-inventor Professor Tim Leighton. "We wanted to build some kind of micro-scrubber that can clean without bleach and detergents, and can get into the crevices and the cracks. And so what we did, what we found is the bubble. So these gas bubbles underwater; these balls of gas, normally just sit there spherically under water. But if you hit them with a sound field you can make their surfaces ripple. And you get such high sheer and rubbing along the surfaces of these ripples that it can clean very effectively," Leighton told Reuters from his lab at the University of Southampton's Institute of Sound and Vibration Research. The patented technology earned Leighton and co-inventor Dr Peter Birkin the Royal Society's Brian Mercer Award for Innovation in 2011. This gave them the opportunity to develop their prototype model into the current hairdryer-type design for manual cleaning. But Leighton said the technology could easily be fixed onto other devices of varying shapes and sizes. He added that Starstream's effectiveness without the need for heating or additives has the potential to transform the cleaning sector. "One of the key factors of Starstream is that it takes any liquid that you're using and makes it several thousand times more effective. So if you're using soapy water or bleach, something like that, it'll make it more effective. But its party trick is to clean with cold water, without any additives, without heating," he said. In laboratory-based tests, Starstream was able to effectively remove biological contamination from medical instruments and bacterial biofilms that typically cause dental disease. Leighton believes it could prove to be a valuable tool in the fight against antibiotic and anti-microbial resistance if the technology could be incorporated into the public's hand washing routine. "If you can clean effectively, as we're doing here, then you can stop the bugs ever entering the body. And if the bugs never enter the body the person doesn't get an infection and you don't have to use these antibiotics, anti-microbial agents. And you've got a whole different pathway for tackling this anti-microbial resistance catastrophe," said Leighton. "Despite all our efforts we haven't been able to change the behavior of people to wash their hands properly. So if we can't change the behavior, we change the water. And our aspiration would be to make that six seconds of washing in cold water without soap - using Starstream- as effective as 20 seconds of warm soapy water. It's an aspiration, we hope to realize it." The device is in limited commercial production by company Ultrawave Ltd., but Leighton is seeking further investment to miniaturize the current design and make it a viable new tool for health providers and the general public.


Zilletti M.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research | Elliott S.J.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research | Gardonio P.,University of Udine
Journal of Sound and Vibration | Year: 2010

This paper is concerned with decentralised velocity feedback for the control of vibration on a flexible structure. Previous studies have shown that a direct velocity feedback loop with a collocated force actuator produces a damping action. Multiple velocity feedback control loops thus reduce the vibration and sound radiation of structures at low frequency resonances, where the response is controlled by damping. However, if the control gains are too high, so that the response of the structure at the control point is close to zero, the feedback control loops will pin the panel at the control positions and thus no damping action is generated. Therefore, in order to maximise the active damping effect, the feedback gains have optimum values and the loops need to be properly tuned. In this paper, a numerical investigation is performed to investigate the possibility of self-tuning the feedback control gains to maximise the power absorbed by the control loops and hence maximise the active damping. The tuning principle is first examined for a single feedback loop for different excitation signals. The tuning of multiple control loops is then considered and the implementation of a practical tuning algorithm is discussed. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Zilletti M.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research | Elliott S.J.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research | Gardonio P.,University of Udine | Rustighi E.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research
Journal of Sound and Vibration | Year: 2012

Simulations have previously shown that, for broadband excitation, adjusting the gain of a local velocity feedback loop to maximise their absorbed power also tends to minimise the kinetic energy of the structure under control. This paper describes an experimental implementation of multiple velocity feedback loops on a flat panel, whose gains can be controlled automatically by an algorithm that maximises their local absorbed power. Taking care to remove excessive phase shift in the control loop allows a stable feedback gain that is high enough to experimentally demonstrate the transition in control action between optimum damping and pinning of the structure. A simple search algorithm is then used to adapt the feedback gains of two control loops to maximise their local absorbed powers, thus demonstrating self-tuning. By measuring the power absorbed by each of these loops and also estimation of the kinetic energy of the plate from velocity measurements for a wide range of the two feedback gains, it is shown that not only does the adaptive algorithm converge to a set of feedback gains that maximise total power absorbed by the two feedback loops, but also that this set of feedback gains is very close to those that minimise the measured kinetic energy of the panel. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Elliott S.J.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research | Zilletti M.,University of Udine
Journal of Sound and Vibration | Year: 2014

In order for an electromagnetic transducer to operate well as either a mechanical shunt damper or as a vibration energy harvester, it must have good electromechanical coupling. A simple two-port analysis is used to derive a non-dimensional measure of electromechanical coupling, which must be large compared with unity for efficient operation in both of these applications. The two-port parameters for an inertial electromagnetic transducer are derived, from which this non-dimensional coupling parameter can be evaluated. The largest value that this parameter takes is approximately equal to the square of the magnetic flux density times the length of wire in the field, divided by the mechanical damping times the electrical resistance. This parameter is found to be only of the order of one for voice coil devices that weigh approximately 1 kg, and so such devices are generally not efficient, within the definition used here, in either of these applications. The non-dimensional coupling parameter is found to scale in approximate proportion to the device's characteristic length, however, and so although miniaturised devices are less efficient, greater efficiency can be obtained with large devices, such as those used to control civil engineering structures. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Zilletti M.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research | Elliott S.J.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research | Rustighi E.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research
Journal of Sound and Vibration | Year: 2012

The tuning of a dynamic vibration absorber is considered such that either the kinetic energy of the host structure is minimised or the power dissipation within the absorber is maximised. If the host structure is approximated as a damped single degree of freedom, the optimal values for the ratio of the absorbers natural frequency to the host structure and the optimal damping ratio of the absorber are shown to be the same whether the kinetic energy of the host structure is minimised or the power dissipation of the absorber is maximised. It is also demonstrated that the total power input into the system does not depend on the two parameters but only on the host structures mass. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Blandeau V.P.,University of Southampton | Blandeau V.P.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research | Joseph P.F.,University of Southampton | Joseph P.F.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research
AIAA Journal | Year: 2010

A semi-analytical model for the prediction of the broadband noise due to the interaction between turbulent rotor wakes and a rotor in contra-rotating open rotors is presented. The unsteady loading of the rear rotor is modeled using classical isolated flat-plate theory. Strip theory is used to treat the spanwise variations of aerodynamic quantities and blade geometry. The turbulent wake is assumed to be homogeneous and isotropic turbulence that is modulated by a train of wake profiles. The model is presented in detail and insight into its modal behavior is provided. A parameter study is conducted to investigate the effects of blade number, rotor-rotor gap and rotor speeds on broadband noise emissions due to rotor-wake/rotor interaction in contra-rotating open rotors. Scaling laws for sound power levels have been established analytically and show good agreement with the results of the parameter study. Copyright © 2010 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. All rights reserved.


Causon A.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research | Verschuur C.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research | Newman T.A.,University of Southampton
Otology and Neurotology | Year: 2013

OBJECTIVES: To review worldwide data on cochlear implant adverse events, test for significant trends over a 10-year period and discuss possible reasons behind such trends. To evaluate the suitability of the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database for analysis of trends in cochlear implant adverse events. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of cochlear implant adverse events reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as recorded on the MAUDE database. Data for each adverse event reported in the years 2000 (n = 237), 2005 (n = 1089), and 2010 (n = 2543) were evaluated and assigned to one of 14 categories according to report content. Incidence data were compared across the 3 sampling points to determine trends. HYPOTHESIS: Improvements in cochlear implant manufacturing processes and surgical techniques would result in a decrease in the proportion of CI adverse events because of primary device failure or surgical factors, relative to those with complex, multi-factorial or idiopathic origins, over the 10 year sampling period. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Statistical analyses showed a significant increase over time in the proportion of CI adverse events that had multiple or unknown causes, particularly cases of gradual idiopathic loss of performance, as compared with those with a clearly defined underlying device-related or medical cause. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that there is an urgent need to undertake further research to investigate causes for idiopathic and gradual CI adverse events to continue the overall improvement in CI outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Otology & Neurotology, Inc.


Blandeau V.P.,University of Southampton | Blandeau V.P.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research | Joseph P.F.,University of Southampton | Joseph P.F.,Institute of Sound and Vibration Research
AIAA Journal | Year: 2011

This paper presents a fundamental investigation into the validity of the classical model by Amiet for predicting the broadband trailing-edge noise due to rotating blades. This approximate model is compared analytically against a model in which the effects of rotation are treated exactly. Low- and high-frequency limits are identified, within which Amiet's model is in excellent agreement with the exact solution. Estimates of the error of Amiet's model outside of these limits are also provided. The method is illustrated by application to an open propeller, a model cooling fan, and a wind turbine. The use of Amiet's model for treating the effects of rotation can provide substantial reductions in computation time when the unsteady blade response is computed from computationally demanding methods, such as computational fluid dynamics. Copyright © 2011 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. All rights reserved.

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