Institute of Soil and Water Resources

Athens, Greece

Institute of Soil and Water Resources

Athens, Greece
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Markou G.,Institute of Soil and Water Resources | Markou G.,Agricultural University of Athens
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2015

In the present work the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis and the microalga Chlorella vulgaris were fed-batch cultivated in ammonia-rich wastewater derived from the anaerobic digestion of poultry litter. Aim of the study was to maximize the biomass production along with the nutrient removal aiming to wastewater treatment. Ammonia and phosphorus removals were very high (>95%) for all cultures investigated. Both microorganisms were able to remove volatile fatty acids to an extent of >90%, indicating that they were capable of mixotrophic growth. Chemical oxygen demand and proteins were also removed in various degrees. In contrast, in all cultures carbohydrate concentration was increased. The biochemical composition of the microorganisms varied greatly and was influenced by the indicate that the nutrient availability. A. platensis accumulated carbohydrates (≈40%), while C. vulgaris accumulated lipids (≈50%), rendering them interesting for biofuel production. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Markou G.,Institute of Soil and Water Resources | Markou G.,Agricultural University of Athens | Iconomou D.,Institute of Technology of Agricultural Products | Sotiroudis .,National Hellenic Research Foundation | And 2 more authors.
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2015

Herein a new approach of exploiting poultry litter (PL) is demonstrated. The suggested method includes drying of PL with simultaneously striping and recovery of ammonia, followed by the direct combustion of dried PL. The generated ash after the combustion, and the striped ammonia consequently, could be used as nutrient source for the cultivation of microalgae or cyanobacteria to produce feed additives. The present study explored the application of PL ash and recovered ammonia for the cultivation of Arthrospira platensis and Chlorella vulgaris. For a simultaneously 90% dissolution of ash potassium and phosphorus, a ratio of acid to ash of 0.02mol-H+/g was required. The optimum mass of ash required was 0.07-0.08g/g dry biomass, while the addition of ammoniac nitrogen of 8-9mgN per g of dry biomass per day was adequate for a satisfactory production of A. platensis and C. vulgaris. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Markou G.,Institute of Soil and Water Resources | Markou G.,Agricultural University of Athens | Iconomou D.,Institute of Technology of Agricultural Products | Muylaert K.,Catholic University of Leuven
Algal Research | Year: 2016

In the present paper, the use of raw poultry litter (PL) as a nutrient source for the cultivation of Arthrospira platensis and Chlorella vulgaris was investigated. PL was added to acid solution (62.5 mM H2SO4) for the extraction of nutrients contained in PL. After settling, the supernatant, called PL leachate (PLL) was diluted 25×, 20×, 15×, and 10× and used as a mediumfor the cultivation of A. platensis and C. vulgaris. A. platensis could not survive in 15× and 10× diluted leachate andwhile in 20× and 25× dilutions the biomass production was only half of that in a control medium(Zarrouk). The biomass composition had a high carbohydrate content (37-44%),which suggests that A. platensis was stressed due to nutrient limitation. C. vulgaris grew well in PLL-based media and the biomass production was higher than in the control medium (BG-11). Biomass composition of C. vulgaris in PLL-basedmedia had lower protein content and higher carbohydrate and lipid content than in the control medium. The overall process for producing microalgal biomass fromPL thatwe propose includes: (i) acid extraction of nutrients through the generation of PL leachate (PLL), (ii) indoor PL composting and recovery of stripped ammonia and CO2, and (iii) use of recovered ammonia and CO2 along with the PLL for the cultivation of microalgae and cyanobacteria for the production of biomass. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Markou G.,Institute of Soil and Water Resources | Markou G.,Agricultural University of Athens
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2015

Poultry litter (PL) was pre-treated in order to reduce its nitrogen content and to increase the C/N ratio. The pre-treatment consisted of a first anaerobiosis phase of about 60 days in order to accumulate ammonia nitrogen, followed by an ammonia stripping phase by heating the substrate at 80 °C for 24 h. The digestion was performed with PL and pre-treated PL (TPL) after ammonia stripping as mono-substrate under four total solids loads, i.e. 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. The TPL after ammonia stripping displayed lower ammonia (62-73%) and VFA (41-65%) concentrations compared to digesters with raw PL, while bio-methane yield increased about 8-124%. Bio-methane yields in the series with TPL after ammonia stripping were about 193, 196, 215 and 147 LCH4/kgCOD, based on the COD added, for 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% TS load, respectively. The results indicate that lowering nitrogen content using the suggested process improves bio-methane yields significantly. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Kavvadias V.,Institute of Soil and Water Resources | Elaiopoulos K.,Institute of Soil and Water Resources | Theocharopoulos S.,Institute of Soil and Water Resources | Soupios P.,Technological Educational Institute of Crete
Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology | Year: 2016

The disposal of olive mill wastewaters (OMW) in shallow and unprotected evaporation ponds is a common, low-cost management practice, followed in Mediterranean countries. So far, the fate of potential soil pollutants in areas located near evaporation ponds is not adequately documented. This study investigates the extent in which the long-term disposal of OMW in evaporation ponds can affect the soil properties of the area located outside the evaporation pond and assesses the fate of the pollution loads of OMW. Four soil profiles situated outside and around the down slope side of the disposal area were excavated. The results showed considerable changes in concentration of soil phenols at the down-site soil profiles, due to the subsurface transport of the OMW. In addition, excessive concentrations of NH4 +, PO4 3− and phenols were recorded in liquid samples taken from inside at the bottom of the soil profiles. It is concluded that unprotected evaporation ponds located in light texture soils pose a serious threat to favour soil and water pollution. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York


Hatzigiannakis E.,Institute of Soil and Water Resources | Pantelakis D.,Institute of Soil and Water Resources | Hatzispiroglou I.,Institute of Soil and Water Resources | Arampatzis G.,Institute of Soil and Water Resources | And 2 more authors.
Environmental Processes | Year: 2016

In order to study river flow, the discharge and the channel bed roughness should be estimated. Discharge has been calculated by the continuity equation. The roughness coefficient of the Manning equation has been used with a view to estimate the bed roughness. In the literature, different values of the Manning roughness coefficient are determined for various flow conditions and geometric characteristics of river sections or different Manning roughness coefficient values are derived from calibration of various numerical models. Measurements of the flow velocity, the flow depth and the cross section area have been performed at three sections along the River Strymonas, which is located in the plain of Serres in Northern Greece. Measurements have been made over the three bridges once a month for a period of 16 months. A modern flow meter has been used in order to measure flow velocity. The monitoring results have shown that the variation of the roughness coefficient, considering the river bottom slope stable, with the hydro-geometric characteristics of the flow is noteworthy and the selection of a constant coefficient value for the simulation of the flow in Strymonas river would not be satisfactory. © 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


PubMed | Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Technological Educational Institute of Crete
Type: | Journal: Bulletin of environmental contamination and toxicology | Year: 2016

The disposal of olive mill wastewaters (OMW) in shallow and unprotected evaporation ponds is a common, low-cost management practice, followed in Mediterranean countries. So far, the fate of potential soil pollutants in areas located near evaporation ponds is not adequately documented. This study investigates the extent in which the long-term disposal of OMW in evaporation ponds can affect the soil properties of the area located outside the evaporation pond and assesses the fate of the pollution loads of OMW. Four soil profiles situated outside and around the down slope side of the disposal area were excavated. The results showed considerable changes in concentration of soil phenols at the down-site soil profiles, due to the subsurface transport of the OMW. In addition, excessive concentrations of NH

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