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Belgrade, Serbia

Lukic V.,Institute of Social science | Tosic B.,University of Belgrade
Acta Geographica Slovenica | Year: 2011

As one form of population mobility, daily commuting represents very complex phenomenon of the spatial separation of the place of work and the place of residence of the part of employed population. The paper deals with changes in scope, directions and structure of commuting flows in Serbia, as well as the interdependence of commuting with other demographic and socio-economic development processes. The comparison was made between the basic characteristics of commuting in Serbia and Slovenia and their catchment areas of employment attraction. The differences in methodology used in the census questionnaires referring to commuters in the last population censuses of Serbia and Slovenia in year 2002 were also discussed. Source


Vukotic V.,University of Montenegro | Vukotic V.,Institute for Strategic Studies and Prognoses | Vukotic V.,Institute of Social science
Donald School Journal of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology | Year: 2013

This paper is looking for answers about the influence of the change of the dominant social paradigm on education system. What reforms of education system are needed today in order to efficiently overcome changes induced by this change of paradigm? Are there any directions we should follow in order to foresee future developments in this area? How can I explain my personal approach to the improvement of education system? How can we define conceptual framework for research in this area? What are directions for future development of education system? Source


Altic M.S.,Institute of Social science
Cartographic Journal | Year: 2012

The paper presents the results of original research based on the comparative analysis of maps from the atlases of Abraham Ortelius, Jodocus and Henricus Hondius, Willem Blaeu, Jan Janssonius, Gerard and Cornelis de Jode, and Gerardus Mercator. We discover the sources that Dutch cartographers and publishers used for their cartographic representations of the above countries and the descriptions appearing on the reverse of these maps. In this regard, we devote special attention to the role played by Gerardus Mercator and his successors. In addition, we evaluate the significance of Dutch cartography in spreading knowledge about the geography and history of Southeastern Europe and, generally, its impact on the perception of the countries bordering the Ottoman Empire. © The British Cartographic Society 2012. Source


Altic M.S.,Institute of Social science
Cartographic Journal | Year: 2015

In this paper, I present the results of an original research study that was based on the analysis of British charts of the Adriatic produced during and immediately after military operations undertaken by British forces and their allies against Napoleon in the Adriatic. I analyse the creation and production of British charts of the Adriatic from the first charting campaign of the Hydrographic Office of 1800–1801 to charts produced in the period of British rule over the island of Lissa of 1811–1815 to the first systematic hydrographic surveying of the Adriatic of 1817–1819 under the leadership of William Henry Smyth that resulted in the first hydrographic atlas and pilot book of the Adriatic. At the same time, the paper evaluates the British contribution to the creation of some of the first reliable nautical charts of the Adriatic and to the development of the nautical cartography of the Adriatic in general. © The British Cartographic Society 2015. Source


Altic M.S.,Institute of Social science
Cartographic Journal | Year: 2016

In this paper, we present the results of an original research study that was based on the analysis of British charts of the Adriatic produced during and immediately after military operations undertaken by British forces and their allies against Napoleon in the Adriatic. We analyse the creation and production of British charts of the Adriatic from the first charting campaign of the Hydrographic Office of 1800–1801 to charts produced in the period of British rule over the island of Lissa of 1811–1815 to the first systematic hydrographic surveying of the Adriatic of 1817–1819 under the leadership of William Henry Smyth that resulted in the first hydrographic atlas and pilot book of the Adriatic. At the same time, the paper evaluates the British contribution to the creation of some of the first reliable nautical charts of the Adriatic and to the development of the nautical cartography of the Adriatic in general. © The British Cartographic Society 2014 Source

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