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Kajetany, Poland

Skarzynski H.,Speech of the Institute of Physiology | Lorens A.,Speech of the Institute of Physiology | Piotrowska A.,Speech of the Institute of Physiology | Skarzynski P.H.,Speech of the Institute of Physiology | Skarzynski P.H.,Institute of Sensory Organs
Medical Science Monitor | Year: 2010

Background: Partial deafness (PD) is a condition in which hearing loss occurs in at least 1 frequency critical to speech understanding. Current options for partial deafness treatment (PDT) rely on preoperative hearing preservation, which, along with the use of different means of acoustic and electric stimulation, enable extending the indications for various assistive hearing devices. Possible solutions include acoustic methods only, the use of hearing aids or middle ear implants, electric complementation, and a combination of electric and acoustic stimulation. Material/Methods: A total of 95 patients (63 adults, 32 children) with different types of PD were treated using selected types of electrodes and the optimal "round window" approach to the inner ear, with at least 36 months of observation. Results: The extension of PDT indications created an opportunity for patients with different hearing impairments who obtained no benefit from a hearing aid and did not qualify for standard cochlear implant application. The authors' observations are based on the findings that preservation of preoperative hearing had been achieved in 97.1% of adult patients (8 years' observation) and in 100% of children (6 years' observation). Those results send the important message that PDT is feasible and effective. Conclusions: To allow comparison of PDT results from different studies, the authors developed the Skarzynski PDT classification system, which permits the comparison of postoperative results, including the degree of hearing preservation and, more importantly, the patient's understanding of speech after treatment. © Med Sci Monit 2010. Source


Skarzynski H.,Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing | Lorens A.,Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing | Dziendziel B.,Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing | Skarzynski P.H.,Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology | Year: 2015

Background: Some adolescents have hearing impairments characterized by normal or slightly elevated thresholds in the low and mid-frequency bands (below 1500. Hz) and nearly total deafness in the high frequency range. These patients often remain beyond the scope of effective hearing aid treatment. Case report: This study presents the case of a 16-year-old adolescent with good hearing in the range 125-1500. Hz and deafness at other frequencies. An implant was used to restore hearing at high frequencies, while preserving low and mid frequency acoustic hearing in the implanted ear. This is described as electro-natural stimulation (ENS) of the inner ear. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that low and mid frequency hearing (up to 1500. Hz) can be preserved using the round window surgical technique. A substantial improvement in speech discrimination was also observed when electrical stimulation on one side was combined with acoustic stimulation on both sides. There is scope to extend qualifying criteria for cochlear implantation to include adolescents who are suited to ENS. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source


Skarzynski P.H.,Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing | Skarzynski P.H.,Medical University of Warsaw | Skarzynski P.H.,Institute of Sensory Organs | Olszewski L.,Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing | And 3 more authors.
Audiology and Neurotology | Year: 2014

Hearing disorders become an increasingly important issue that influences quality of life and many other economic factors. Due to the prolongation of human life and the more active lifestyles of people in retirement age, there is an increasing requirement for the available treatment options of hearing loss in the aging population. The aim of this study was to compare the hearing preservation outcomes of adult patients implanted with the Cochlear™ Nucleus® CI422 when divided into two groups by age, younger and older than 65 years of age. The study cohort consisted of 62 patients implanted from January 2011 through December 2013 at our clinic. All patients were assessed and classified according to the hearing preservation classification. Comparing the results between subgroups, we observed that the degree of hearing preservation was greater in younger adults than in older adults. Results of this review may suggest that deeper insertion is to be recommended for an older population of cochlear implant recipients. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel. Source


Lazard D.S.,Bionics Institute | Vincent C.,Service dOtologie et dOtoneurologie | Venail F.,Montpellier University Hospital Center | van de Heyning P.,University of Antwerp | And 24 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Objective: To test the influence of multiple factors on cochlear implant (CI) speech performance in quiet and in noise for postlinguistically deaf adults, and to design a model of predicted auditory performance with a CI as a function of the significant factors. Study Design: Retrospective multi-centre study. Methods: Data from 2251 patients implanted since 2003 in 15 international centres were collected. Speech scores in quiet and in noise were converted into percentile ranks to remove differences between centres. The influence of 15 pre-, per- and postoperative factors, such as the duration of moderate hearing loss (mHL), the surgical approach (cochleostomy or round window approach), the angle of insertion, the percentage of active electrodes, and the brand of device were tested. The usual factors, duration of profound HL (pHL), age, etiology, duration of CI experience, that are already known to have an influence, were included in the statistical analyses. Results: The significant factors were: the pure tone average threshold of the better ear, the brand of device, the percentage of active electrodes, the use of hearing aids (HAs) during the period of pHL, and the duration of mHL. Conclusions: A new model was designed showing a decrease of performance that started during the period of mHL, and became faster during the period of pHL. The use of bilateral HAs slowed down the related central reorganization that is the likely cause of the decreased performance. © 2012 Lazard et al. Source


Blamey P.,Bionics Institute | Blamey P.,University of Melbourne | Artieres F.,Institute Saint Pierre | Artieres F.,Montpellier University Hospital Center | And 29 more authors.
Audiology and Neurotology | Year: 2013

Objective: To update a 15-year-old study of 800 postlinguistically deaf adult patients showing how duration of severe to profound hearing loss, age at cochlear implantation (CI), age at onset of severe to profound hearing loss, etiology and CI experience affected CI outcome. Study Design: Retrospective multicenter study. Methods: Data from 2251 adult patients implanted since 2003 in 15 international centers were collected and speech scores in quiet were converted to percentile ranks to remove differences between centers. Results: The negative effect of long duration of severe to profound hearing loss was less important in the new data than in 1996; the effects of age at CI and age at onset of severe to profound hearing loss were delayed until older ages; etiology had a smaller effect, and the effect of CI experience was greater with a steeper learning curve. Patients with longer durations of severe to profound hearing loss were less likely to improve with CI experience than patients with shorter duration of severe to profound hearing loss. Conclusions: The factors that were relevant in 1996 were still relevant in 2011, although their relative importance had changed. Relaxed patient selection criteria, improved clinical management of hearing loss, modifications of surgical practice, and improved devices may explain the differences. © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel. Source

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