Time filter

Source Type

Mbang Nguema O.A.,University of Health Sciences | Mbang Nguema O.A.,Institute Of Recherches En Ecologie Tropicale Iret | Mbang Nguema O.A.,Université des Sciences et Techniques de Masuku | Mawili-Mboumba D.P.,University of Health Sciences | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Medical Entomology | Year: 2016

Human African trypanosomiasis became a neglected disease after the 1960s, when case numbers dropped dramatically. It again became a public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa at the end of the 1990s, when new cases were reported, notably in Central Africa, and specifically in Gabon, where historic foci existed and new cases have been reported. Therefore, the present study reports on an entomological survey conducted in May 2012 to determine the pathogenic trypanosome infection rate in tsetse flies and characterize the diversity of Trypanosoma species in the Ivindo National Park (INP) in northeastern Gabon. Nine Vavoua traps were used to catch tsetse over a 7-days period. All tsetse flies captured were identified to species, dissected, and trypanosome species identified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In total, 160 tsetse flies were analyzed, including Glossina palpalis palpalis, Glossina fusca congolense, and Glossina tachinoïdes. The trypanosome infection rate of the flies was 6.3 and 31.9% using microscopy and PCR, respectively. The species identified were Trypanosoma congolense savannah type, Trypanosoma brucei brucei, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, Trypanosoma vivax, and Trypanosoma congolense forest type. Trypanosoma risk index was 0.75 and 7.05 for humans and for animals, respectively. This study illustrates the diversity of Trypanosoma species infecting the tsetse flies in the INP. The simultaneous occurrence of Trypanosoma and tsetse from the palpalis group may suggest that the reservoirs of African animal trypanosomiasis should be carefully monitored in this area. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved.


Mavoungou J.F.,Institute Of Recherches En Ecologie Tropicale Iret | Mavoungou J.F.,Université des Sciences et Techniques de Masuku | Makanga B.K.,Cheikh Anta Diop University | Acapovi-Yao G.,University dAbidjan | And 2 more authors.
Parasite | Year: 2012

Abundance and species diversity of tabanids (Diptera) in the biosphere reserve Ipassa-Makokou (Gabon) during the rainy season The abundance and species diversity of tabanids were evaluated by trapping of insects using Vavoua traps, during the rainy season, from October 4 to November 30, 2009, in three different habitats: primary forest, secondary forest and village, in the biosphere reserve Ipassa-IRET Makokou in Gabon. Eight species belonging to three genera of tabanids have been identified for a total of 402 specimens caught. The tabanid species numerically the most abundant were: Tabanus secedens Walker, 1854 (55.2 %), Tabanus obscurehirtus Ricardo, 1908 (13.9 %), Chrysops dimidiatus Wulp, 1885 (11.2 %) and Chrysops silaceus Austen, 1907 (10,7 %). The less abundant species were Tabanus par Walker, 1854 (3.2 %), Tabanus besti arbucklei Austen, 1912 (3 %), Tabanus marmorosus congoicola Bequaert, 1930 (1 %) and Ancala fasciata fasciata (Fabricius, 1775) (0.5 %). Specimens of the genera Tabanus and Chrysops could not be identified, these insects represented respectively 0.7 % and 0.5 % of the insects trapped. The highest proportion of tabanids was trapped in secondary forest (75.1 %) and the lower in primary forest (4.5 %).


PubMed | Institute Of Recherches En Ecologie Tropicale Iret
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Parasite (Paris, France) | Year: 2012

The abundance and species diversity of tabanids were evaluated by trapping of insects using Vavoua traps, during the rainy season, from October 4 to November 30, 2009, in three different habitats: primary forest, secondary forest and village, in the biosphere reserve Ipassa-IRET Makokou in Gabon. Eight species belonging to three genera of tabanids have been identified for a total of 402 specimens caught. The tabanid species numerically the most abundant were: Tabanus secedens Walker, 1854 (55.2%), Tabanus obscurehirtus Ricardo, 1908 (13.9%), Chrysops dimidiatus Wulp, 1885 (11.2%) and Chrysops silaceus Austen, 1907 (10.7%). The less abundant species were Tabanus par Walker, 1854 (3.2%), Tabanus besti arbucklei Austen, 1912 (3%), Tabanus marmorosus congoicola Bequaert, 1930 (1%) and Ancala fasciata fasciata (Fabricius, 1775) (0.5%). Specimens of the genera Tabanus and Chrysops could not be identified, these insects represented respectively 0.7% and 0.5% of the insects trapped. The highest proportion of tabanids was trapped in secondary forest (75.1%) and the lower in primary forest (4.5%).

Loading Institute Of Recherches En Ecologie Tropicale Iret collaborators
Loading Institute Of Recherches En Ecologie Tropicale Iret collaborators