Institute Of Recerca Biomedica Lleida

Lleida, Spain

Institute Of Recerca Biomedica Lleida

Lleida, Spain
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Sanchez A.G.,Hospital Universitario Arnau Of Vilanova And Institute Of Recerca Biomedica Lleida | Andrade E.L.,Hospital Of Dia Miquel Marti I Pol | Marsal J.V.,Institute Of Recerca Biomedica Lleida | Tauste L.A.,Hospital Of Dia Miquel Marti I Pol | And 12 more authors.
International Journal of Neuroscience | Year: 2017

Purpose/aim: Ultrasound has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and pain-relief benefits in several conditions such as cellulite or trauma events. We assessed the efficacy of ultrasound therapy on nodules associated with first-line treatments in multiple sclerosis patients. Materials and methods: Twenty-two multiple sclerosis patients were enrolled during 2013 and randomized to two groups: in the control group patients were treated only with a conventional gel prescribed for cellulite and nodules, while in the experimental group the gel was combined with ultrasound therapy. Patients were treated during 10 weeks and followed up for 10 additional weeks. Three nodules were assessed for each patient, measuring size, pain and redness at 0, 10 and 20 weeks. Results: We found a significant decrease in both groups in size, pain and redness across the three visits (p < 0.0001 for size, p = 0.01 and p < 0.0001 for pain, and p = 0.0002 and p < 0.0001 for redness, respectively for the difference at visit 2 and 3 with respect to visit 1). More interestingly, we observed a greater reduction in pain and redness in the ultrasound-treated group, but the difference was only statistically significant at 10 weeks (p = 0.01 for both pain and redness). On the third visit, no differences between control and experimental groups were detected, both achieving the same levels in measured variables. Conclusions: Both treatments are useful to improve skin reaction after first-line treatments, but ultrasound in combination with gel achieves a faster reduction in pain and redness, suggesting that ultrasound treatment might be a good analgesic for nodule management in multiple sclerosis patients. Copyright © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor and Francis Group.


Barbe F.,Institute Of Recerca Biomedica Lleida | Barbe F.,Research Center Biomedica en Red Enfermedades Respiratorias | Duran-Cantolla J.,Research Center Biomedica en Red Enfermedades Respiratorias | Duran-Cantolla J.,Hospital Txagorritxu | And 24 more authors.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine | Year: 2010

Rationale: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the current treatment for patients with symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Its use for all subjects with sleep-disordered breathing, regardless of daytime symptoms, is unclear. Objectives: This multicenter controlled trial assesses the effects of 1 year of CPAP treatment on blood pressure (BP) in nonsymptomatic, hypertensive patients with OSA. Methods: We evaluated 359 patients with OSA. Inclusion criteria consisted of an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) greater than 19 hour-1, an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score less than 11, and one of the following: under antihypertensive treatment or systolic blood pressure greater than 140 or diastolic blood pressure greater than 90mm Hg. Patients were randomized to CPAP (n = 178) or to conservative treatment (n = 181). BP was evaluated at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months of follow-up. Measurements and Main Results: Mean (SD) values were as follows: age, 56±10 years;bodymass index (BMI), 32±5kg·m-2;AHI, 45± 20 hour -1; and Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, 7 ± 3. After adjusting for follow-up time, baseline blood pressure values, AHI, time with arterial oxygen saturation less than 90%, and BMI, together with the change in BMI at follow-up, CPAP treatment decreased systolic blood pressure by 1.89 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: -3.90, 0.11 mm Hg; P = 0.0654), and diastolic blood pressure by 2.19 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: -3.46, -0.93 mm Hg; P = 0.0008). The most significant reduction in BP was in patients who used CPAP formore than 5.6 hours per night. CPAP compliance was related to AHI and the decrease in Epworth Sleepiness Scale score. Conclusions: In nonsleepy hypertensive patients with OSA, CPAP treatment for 1 year is associated with a small decrease in BP. This effect is evident only in patients who use CPAP for more than 5.6 hours per night. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00127348).


PubMed | Institute Of Recerca Biomedica Lleida, Hospital Of Dia Miquel Marti I Pol and Hospital Universitario Arnau Of Vilanova And Institute Of Recerca Biomedica Lleida
Type: | Journal: The International journal of neuroscience | Year: 2016

Ultrasound has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and pain-relief benefits in several conditions such as cellulite or trauma events. We assessed the efficacy of ultrasound therapy on nodules associated with first-line treatments in multiple sclerosis patients.Twenty-two multiple sclerosis patients were enrolled during 2013 and randomized to two groups: in the control group patients were treated only with a conventional gel prescribed for cellulite and nodules, while in the experimental group the gel was combined with ultrasound therapy. Patients were treated during 10 weeks and followed up for 10 additional weeks. Three nodules were assessed for each patient, measuring size, pain and redness at 0, 10 and 20 weeks.We found a significant decrease in both groups in size, pain and redness across the three visits (p < 0.0001 for size, p = 0.01 and p < 0.0001 for pain, and p = 0.0002 and p < 0.0001 for redness, respectively for the difference at visit 2 and 3 with respect to visit 1). More interestingly, we observed a greater reduction in pain and redness in the ultrasound-treated group, but the difference was only statistically significant at 10 weeks (p = 0.01 for both pain and redness). On the third visit, no differences between control and experimental groups were detected, both achieving the same levels in measured variables.Both treatments are useful to improve skin reaction after first-line treatments, but ultrasound in combination with gel achieves a faster reduction in pain and redness, suggesting that ultrasound treatment might be a good analgesic for nodule management in multiple sclerosis patients.


PubMed | Institute Of Recerca Biomedica Lleida
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine | Year: 2010

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the current treatment for patients with symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Its use for all subjects with sleep-disordered breathing, regardless of daytime symptoms, is unclear.This multicenter controlled trial assesses the effects of 1 year of CPAP treatment on blood pressure (BP) in nonsymptomatic, hypertensive patients with OSA.We evaluated 359 patients with OSA. Inclusion criteria consisted of an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) greater than 19 hour(-1), an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score less than 11, and one of the following: under antihypertensive treatment or systolic blood pressure greater than 140 or diastolic blood pressure greater than 90 mm Hg. Patients were randomized to CPAP (n = 178) or to conservative treatment (n = 181). BP was evaluated at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months of follow-up.Mean (SD) values were as follows: age, 56 +/- 10 years; body mass index (BMI), 32 +/- 5 kg x m(-2); AHI, 45 +/- 20 hour(-1); and Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, 7 +/- 3. After adjusting for follow-up time, baseline blood pressure values, AHI, time with arterial oxygen saturation less than 90%, and BMI, together with the change in BMI at follow-up, CPAP treatment decreased systolic blood pressure by 1.89 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: -3.90, 0.11 mm Hg; P = 0.0654), and diastolic blood pressure by 2.19 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: -3.46, -0.93 mm Hg; P = 0.0008). The most significant reduction in BP was in patients who used CPAP for more than 5.6 hours per night. CPAP compliance was related to AHI and the decrease in Epworth Sleepiness Scale score.In nonsleepy hypertensive patients with OSA, CPAP treatment for 1 year is associated with a small decrease in BP. This effect is evident only in patients who use CPAP for more than 5.6 hours per night. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00127348).

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