Time filter

Source Type

Berryman N.,University of Montréal | Berryman N.,University of Poitiers | Bherer L.,University of Montréal | Bherer L.,Concordia University at Montréal | And 11 more authors.
Experimental Gerontology | Year: 2013

The objective of this study was to examine the relationships between executive functions, physical fitness and mobility in well-functioning older adults. Forty-eight well functioning older adults (70.5 ± 5.3. years old; 20 men, 28 women) were included in this study. Two median splits were conducted based on each individual's performance for the 10MWT and TUG. Comparisons between groups of slower and faster individuals were made with regard to executive functions and physical fitness parameters. A correlational approach was used to assess the association between variables. Between groups comparisons revealed that faster individuals in mobility tests demonstrate better performances in measures of cognitive flexibility (0.68


Gabison S.,University Institute of Health Sciences | Gabison S.,University of Toronto | Verrier M.C.,University Institute of Health Sciences | Verrier M.C.,University of Toronto | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine | Year: 2014

Context: Trunk control is essential to engage in activities of daily living. Measuring trunk strength and function in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) is difficult. Trunk function has not been studied in non-traumatic SCI (NTSCI). Objectives: To characterize changes in trunk strength and seated functional reach in individuals with NTSCI during inpatient rehabilitation. To determine if trunk strength and seated reach differ between walkers and wheelchair users. To explore relationships between trunk and hip strength and seated functional reach. Design: Observational study. Setting: Two SCI rehabilitation facilities. Participants: 32 subacute inpatients (mean age 48.0 ± 15.4 years). Outcome measures: Isometric strength of trunk and hip and function (Multidirectional Reach Test: MDRT) were assessed at admission and within 2 weeks of discharge. Analysis of variance was conducted for admission measures (MDRT, hip and trunk strength) between walkers and wheelchair users. Changes in MDRT, hip and trunk strength were evaluated using parametric and non-parametric statistics. The level of association between changes in values of MRDT and strength was also examined. Results: Significant differences between walkers and wheelchair users were found for strength measures (P < 0.05) but not for MDRT. Left- and right-sided reaches increased in wheelchair users only (P < 0.05). Associations between changes in hip strength, trunk strength, and reach distance were found (R = 0.67- 0.73). Conclusion: In clinical settings, it is feasible and relevant to assess trunk, hip strength, and MRDT. Future studies require strategies to increase the number of participants assessed, in order to inform clinicians about relevant rehabilitation interventions. © The Academy of Spinal Cord Injury Professionals Inc. 2014.


Barthelemy A.,Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm | Forget R.,Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm | Forget R.,University of Montréal | Vaillant J.,Grenoble University Hospital Center | And 2 more authors.
Kinesitherapie | Year: 2015

The professions of physiotherapist in Quebec and "masso-kinésithérapeute" in France were both created in the same historical context, but evolved distinctly. In Quebec, entry-level training in university, post-graduate training of teacher-researchers and the development of research in rehabilitation science have been fundamental elements in the development of evidence-based practice. Could this be a source of inspiration for French colleagues? © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.


Carver T.,Concordia University at Montréal | Nadeau S.,University of Montréal | Nadeau S.,Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm | Leroux A.,Concordia University at Montréal
Gait and Posture | Year: 2011

Chronic hemiparetic stroke individuals are at a higher risk of falling. This may be due to balance impairments, cardiovascular deconditioning, and muscle weakness associated with stroke effects. Postural instability associated with fatigue would likely be attained more rapidly for stroke individuals than for healthy individuals. Objective: To determine the effects of physical exertion induced by walking on postural stability in hemiparetic stroke participants. Methods: Twelve hemiparetic participants and 12 control participants walked over-ground for a duration of 6. min and 18. min at their comfortable speed. Postural stability was assessed using centre of pressure related parameters during double-legged stance and tasks before the walk, immediately after the walk, 15. min post-walk, and 30. min post-walk. Measures of physical exertion during walking were also obtained from cardiorespiratory parameters, time-distance parameters, and subjective scales. Variables on postural stability and on physical exertion were analyzed using two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Generalized Estimating Equations. Results: Physical exertion measures significantly increased when the duration of walk was increased from 6. min to 18. min in both control and hemiparetic participants. For postural stability measures, increasing the duration of walking led to a significant increase of postural sway in double-legged stance and sit-to-stand for the hemiparetic participants only. This effect on balance of hemiparetic participants was observed immediately after the end of the walk. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that physical exertion can increase postural sway in hemiparetic participants which could possibly lead to an increased risk of falling in these individuals. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Lauziere S.,Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm | Lauziere S.,University of Montréal | Mieville C.,Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm | Mieville C.,University of Montréal | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine | Year: 2014

Objective: To assess plantarflexion moment and hip joint moment after-effects following walking on a split-belt treadmill in healthy individuals and individuals post-stroke. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Ten healthy individuals (mean age 57.6 years (standard deviation; SD 17.2)) and twenty individuals poststroke (mean age 49.3 years (SD 13.2)). Methods: Participants walked on an instrumented split-belt treadmill under 3 gait periods: i) baseline (tied-belt); ii) adaptation (split-belt); and iii) post-adaptation (tied-belt). Participants post-stroke performed the protocol with the paretic and nonparetic leg on the faster belt when belts were split. Kinematic data were recorded with the Optotrak system and ground reaction forces were collected via the instrumented split-belt treadmill. Results: In both groups, the fast plantarflexion moment was reduced and the slow plantarflexion moment was increased from mid-stance to toe-off in the post-adaptation period. Significant relationships were found between the plantarflexion moment and contralateral step length. Conclusion: Split-belt treadmills could be useful for restoring step length symmetry in individuals post-stroke who present with a longer paretic step length because the use of this type of intervention increases paretic plantarflexion moments. This intervention might be less recommended for individuals post-stroke with a shorter paretic step length because it reduces the paretic plantarflexion moment. © 2014 The Authors.


Lemay J.-F.,Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm | Nadeau S.,University of Montréal
Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine | Year: 2013

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the concurrent validity of the Smart Balance Master (SBM) tests in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury. Design: Correlational study. Subjects: A total of 32 individuals with an American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale D spinal cord injury able to walk 10 m independently, with or without walking assistive devices. Methods: Outcome measures obtained from static and dynamic balance tests while standing using the SBM were compared to data obtained from the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) (14 items). Results: No difference in performance between paraplegic and tetraplegic subjects was noted in the SBM tests. No ceiling effect was apparent in the SBM tests. The highest levels of association with the BBS was found for the limits of stability test (-0.416 < R <-0.752, p = 0.05). The limits of stability test also correlated significantly with the majority of the other SBM tests and, except for the weight-shifting test, was completed by all but two participants. Conclusion: The limits of stability test of the SBM system appears to be useful for assessing dynamic standing-balance ability in spinal cord injury subjects and could potentially be used to complement the BBS. © 2013 The Authors.


Lauziere S.,Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm | Lauziere S.,University of Montréal | Mieville C.,Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm | Mieville C.,University of Montréal | And 7 more authors.
Clinical Biomechanics | Year: 2015

Background Some studies in post-stroke individuals hypothesized that asymmetrical gait might be a strategy to symmetrize the effort in lower limb muscles. This study analyzed the asymmetry in the levels of effort, net joint moment during gait (walking moment) and maximal potential moment in the plantarflexors, hip flexors and extensors during gait. Methods Twenty post-stroke and 10 healthy individuals were assessed when walking at a comfortable speed on a treadmill. Their efforts were estimated bilaterally with a biomechanical approach (muscular utilization ratio) which is the walking moment relative to the muscle's maximal capability (maximal potential moment). Pearson correlations were used to assess the relationship between asymmetry in walking moment and maximal potential moment. Findings Healthy individuals presented symmetrical values of effort, walking moment and maximal potential moment for all muscle groups. Post-stroke individuals had asymmetrical walking moment in plantarflexion and hip extension. For the asymmetry in the levels of effort and maximal potential moment, they formed two subgroups; the low-effort subgroup presented symmetrical effort and their asymmetry in walking moment was not related to their asymmetry in maximal potential moment for plantarflexors (R = 0.44; P > 0.05). The high-effort subgroup presented asymmetrical effort (paretic side higher) and their asymmetry in walking moments was significantly associated to their asymmetry in maximal potential moment for plantarflexors and hip extensors (0.73 ≤ R ≤ 0.82; P < 0.05). Interpretation Asymmetry in muscular strength is a determinant of walking moment asymmetry when the level of effort is high. These results might guide the type of locomotor training. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Briere A.,Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm | Lauziere S.,Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm | Gravel D.,Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm | Nadeau S.,Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm
Stroke | Year: 2010

Background and Purpose-: It is unknown whether hemiparetic individuals are aware of their weight-bearing asymmetry during sit-to-stand tasks. This study compared the error between hemiparetic and healthy individuals' perception of weight-bearing and their actual weight-bearing distribution during the sit-to-stand task and analyzed the association between the knee extensor muscle strength and the weight-bearing distribution and perception. Methods-: Nineteen unilateral hemiparetic subjects and 15 healthy individuals participated in the study. They performed the sit-to-stand transfer on force platforms under different foot placements (spontaneous and symmetrical) and had to rate their perceived weight-bearing distribution at the lower limbs on a visual analog scale. The strength of the knee extensors was assessed with a Biodex dynamometer. Results-: The hemiparetic individuals presented greater weight-bearing asymmetry and errors of perception than the healthy individuals. Although no significant association was found between strength and weight-bearing perception, moderate associations were found between strength and weight-bearing distribution for both the spontaneous (r=0.75, P<0.01) and symmetrical (r=0.71, P<0.01) foot position conditions. Conclusions-: This study revealed that individuals with hemiparesis after a stroke do not perceive themselves as asymmetrical when executing the sit-to-stand transfer and that the knee extensor strength is a factor linked to their weight-bearing asymmetry, not to their perception. © 2010 American Heart Association, Inc.


PubMed | Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of rehabilitation medicine | Year: 2013

The aim of this study was to investigate the concurrent validity of the Smart Balance Master (SBM) tests in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury.Correlational study.A total of 32 individuals with an American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale D spinal cord injury able to walk 10 m independently, with or without walking assistive devices.Outcome measures obtained from static and dynamic balance tests while standing using the SBM were compared to data obtained from the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) (14 items).No difference in performance between paraplegic and tetraplegic subjects was noted in the SBM tests. No ceiling effect was apparent in the SBM tests. The highest levels of association with the BBS was found for the limits of stability test (-0.416

Loading Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm collaborators
Loading Institute Of Readaptation Gingras Lindsay Of Montreal Irglm collaborators