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Dagher J.H.,McGill University | Dagher J.H.,Institute Of Readaptation Lindsay Gingras Of Montreal | Costa C.,Institute Of Readaptation Lindsay Gingras Of Montreal | Lamoureux J.,University of Montréal | And 2 more authors.
Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences | Year: 2016

Objective: To determine if health outcomes and demographics differ according to helmet status between persons with cycling-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Methods: This is a retrospective study of 128 patients admitted to the Montreal General Hospital following a TBI that occurred while cycling from 2007-2011. Information was collected from the Quebec trauma registry and the coroner's office in cases of death from cycling accidents. The independent variables collected were socio-demographic, helmet status, clinical and neurological patient information. The dependent variables evaluated were length of stay (LOS), extended Glasgow outcome scale (GOS-E), injury severity scale (ISS), discharge destination and death. Results: 25% of cyclists wore a helmet. The helmet group was older, more likely to be university educated, married and retired. Unemployment, longer intensive care unit (ICU) stay, severe intracranial bleeding and neurosurgical interventions were more common in the no helmet group. There was no significant association between the severity of the TBI, ISS scores, GOS-E or death and helmet wearing. The median age of the subjects who died was higher than those who survived. Conclusion: Cyclists without helmets were younger, less educated, single and unemployed. They had more severe TBIs on imaging, longer LOS in ICU and more neurosurgical interventions. Elderly cyclists admitted to the hospital appear to be at higher risk of dying in the event of a TBI. Copyright © The Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences Inc. 2015.


Dagher J.H.,McGill University | Dagher J.H.,Institute Of Readaptation Lindsay Gingras Of Montreal | Richard-Denis A.,Institute Of Readaptation Lindsay Gingras Of Montreal | Lamoureux J.,University of Montréal | And 2 more authors.
Brain Injury | Year: 2013

Primary objective: This study assesses the influence of socio-demographic, psychosocial, clinical and radiological variables on the outcome of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in an acute care inpatient setting. Research design: Retrospective cohort study. Methods and procedure: A total of 2127 inpatients with MTBI were included. Outcomes measured were Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS-E), the FIM® instrument, length of stay (LOS) and discharge destination. Main outcomes and results: Fifty-four per cent of patients with MTBI with a median GOS-E of 2 were discharged home with no need for further follow-up. Age, LOS, lower Glasgow score (GCS) at admission, insurance coverage and positive CT scans were associated with rehabilitation referrals on discharge. Age, LOS, alcohol and drug abuse, motor vehicle collision and lower GCS at admission were associated with greater physical disabilities and functional impairment at discharge. FIM® cognitive functional scores were higher in women, younger patients and patients without psychiatric disorders. Brain lesions were correlated with longer LOS. CT scan findings in patients with MTBI may help clinicians predict the final outcome and resources required for patient care during their hospitalization and on discharge. Conclusion: This study can help healthcare professionals in treating and planning future care of patients with MTBI. © 2013 Informa UK Ltd.


PubMed | McGill University, University of Montréal and Institute Of Readaptation Lindsay Gingras Of Montreal
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: The Canadian journal of neurological sciences. Le journal canadien des sciences neurologiques | Year: 2016

To determine if health outcomes and demographics differ according to helmet status between persons with cycling-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI).This is a retrospective study of 128 patients admitted to the Montreal General Hospital following a TBI that occurred while cycling from 2007-2011. Information was collected from the Quebec trauma registry and the coroners office in cases of death from cycling accidents. The independent variables collected were socio-demographic, helmet status, clinical and neurological patient information. The dependent variables evaluated were length of stay (LOS), extended Glasgow outcome scale (GOS-E), injury severity scale (ISS), discharge destination and death.25% of cyclists wore a helmet. The helmet group was older, more likely to be university educated, married and retired. Unemployment, longer intensive care unit (ICU) stay, severe intracranial bleeding and neurosurgical interventions were more common in the no helmet group. There was no significant association between the severity of the TBI, ISS scores, GOS-E or death and helmet wearing. The median age of the subjects who died was higher than those who survived.Cyclists without helmets were younger, less educated, single and unemployed. They had more severe TBIs on imaging, longer LOS in ICU and more neurosurgical interventions. Elderly cyclists admitted to the hospital appear to be at higher risk of dying in the event of a TBI.

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