Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research

Kolkata, India

Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research

Kolkata, India
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Chakraborty M.,University of Calcutta | Bhattacharya S.,University of Calcutta | Bose M.,University of Calcutta | Sasmal S.K.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | And 2 more authors.
Indian Journal of Experimental Biology | Year: 2017

Aqueous extract of freshwater mussel, Lamellidens marginalis is known to possess potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Here, we have made an attempt to purify anti-inflammatory protein from Lamellidens marginalis extract (LME). Aqueous LME was prepared, and total protein was precipitated by 60% ammonium sulfate followed by purification through ion exchange chromatography. Isolated fractions were studied for anti-inflammatory activity in in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Active fractions were characterized by SDS PAGE and HPLC. Protein recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation showed four distinct peaks in diethyl-aminoethyl cellulose ion exchange chromatography when eluted with stepwise salt gradient. Protein fraction eluted in 0.5 M sodium chloride solution showed maximum specific activity and anti-inflammatory activity in acute model and adjuvant induced chronic inflammation model. This fraction also showed cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2) enzyme inhibitory activity in in-vitro system. In SDS-PAGE 0.5 M NaCl fraction showed multiple bands after Coomassie brilliant blue staining and three distinct peaks in HPLC. In this study, we identified an anti-inflammatory protein fraction with high anionic property which could be attributed to inhibition of COX2 enzyme activity. © 2017, National Institute of Science Communication. All rights reserved.


Mradu G.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | Saumyakanti S.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | Sohini M.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | Arup M.,University of Calcutta
International Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemical Research | Year: 2012

Many phenolic-flavonoids found in plants exhibit antipyretic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory & antioxidant properties. Twelve phenolic compounds namely Ellagic acid, Catechol, Gallic acid, Quercetin, Resorcinol, Tannic acid, Vanillin, Salicylic acid, Acetyl Salicylic acid, Benzoic acid, Phloroglucinol and Ascorbic acid were taken up for qualitative and quantitative HPLC analysis. The objective of this research was to determine the standard HPLC chromatograms of twelve prominent phenolic compounds found in medicinal plants using four mobile phases having different elution gradients and run times. Six mg of each standard compound was dissolved in 10 ml Methanol, sonicated and passed through Membrane Filter (0.45μm & 47mm diameter) before injecting 20 μl in Column: Symmetry C18 (5μm, 4.6*250mm) & flow rate 1.0 ml/min. UV-detection at 280 360 nm was performed using 515 HPLC pumps and 2489 UV/VIS detectors. Four HPLC methods using different mobile phases were used. Methods A & B used varying ratios of Methanol and Acetic acid as solvents, the runtime being 22 and 25 minutes respectively. Similarly methods C and D used Acetonitrile and Phosphoric acid, run times being 30 and 45 minutes. All the methods resulted in similar pattern and sequence of elution of these phenolic compounds as unique chromatographs when analyzed individually and together. These HPLC fingerprints of standard phenolic compounds could be used as benchmarks for comparison during the qualitative and quantitative analysis of unknown compounds present in any plant sample. Use of multiple methods involving different phases would increase the validity and reliability of results.


Gupta M.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | Banerjee D.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | Mukherjee A.,University of Calcutta
Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytotherapy | Year: 2013

The analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory effects of methanol extract of botanical medicine prepared by taking equal amounts of dried stems of Tinospora cordifolia Willd, fruits of Emblica officinalis Gaertn and rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus Linn were evaluated using standard methods. These botanicals have been traditionally used in Indian system of medicine for treatment of fever, joint pain, body ache and muscular pain in the form of single or combined drug therapy. After acute toxicity studies, anti-inflammatory effect was assessed using carrageen induced paw oedema test and antipyretic effect using yeast induced pyrexia method. Tail immersion, hot plate and writhings test were used for determining the analgesic properties. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of polyphenolic flavonoids, tannin and saponins. Significant anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic properties were noticed in dose dependant manner after methanolic extract administration, especially at 500 mg/kg dose. These test drug activities were sustained and comparable to the standard drugs while exhibiting no acute toxicity. The findings indicate that the methanolic extract possesses significantly high anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic properties without any acute toxicity possibly due to the presence of flavonoids. © 2013 Academic Journals.


Gupta M.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | Sasmal S.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | Mukherjee A.,University of Calcutta
International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research | Year: 2014

Saraca asoca has been well-known for its therapeutic pharmacological properties and mentioned in the Ayurvedic texts as a cure for pain, fever and inflammation. The aqueous extract of its seeds was pharmacologically evaluated in this study for its acute antiinflammatory, antipyretic and peripheral analgesic effect on rodents. Phyto-chemical analysis revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, carbohydrates, saponins and high concentrations of phenolic compounds. No significant toxic symptoms, morbidity or mortality were observed in animals during acute toxicity study up to 1500 mg/kg dose. Peripheral analgesic effect assessed from inhibition in writhings after drug administration was found to be significant and comparable, measuring 38.15 % at 300 mg/Kg drug dose and 49.19 % at 500 mg/kg drug dosage while the standard drug Aspirin resulted in 61.38% inhibition after 15 minutes as compared to the control group. The aqueous extract showed significant antipyretic effect at both drug doses as compared to the standard Aspirin (100 mg/Kg), the pharmacological activity being more sustained and persistent up to 5 hours possibly due to the presence of flavonoids. The reduction in rectal temperature after 4 hours was 3.32% in case of standard, 2.83% in 300 mg/kg test drug, 3.19% in 500 mg/kg test drug and only 1.08 % in the control group up to 5 hours. The Carrageenan-induced paw edema model was used to evaluate the acute anti-inflammatory effect using rats. The circumference of paw oedema induced by the Carrageen agent at 300 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg drug dose showed significant decrease over 4 hours of 76.74% and 93.02% as compared to standard drug Indomethacin, which resulted in 97.67% inhibition when compared with control group. The results confirm the significant anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic pharmacological actions of aqueous extract of Saraca asoca seeds.


Gupta M.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | Saumya Kanti S.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | Arup M.,University of Calcutta
International Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemical Research | Year: 2013

The anti-inflammatory activity of a traditional antipyretic polyherbal drug was assessed by preparing its acetone, methanolic and aqueous extracts using cotton pellet method on rats. No mortality or toxic symptom was observed up to the dose of 1000 mg/kg during acute toxicity studies while flavonoids, tannins and carbohydrates were found present in all the extracts. The test drug exhibited highly significant anti-inflammatory effect in case of all extracts at 600 mg/kg dose which was close to that of the standard drug Indomethacin. Slightly lower impact was observed when using test drug dose of 400 mg/kg. Among the three extracts, the methanolic one exhibited the highest inhibition of granulation tissue formation, the aqueous extract having a slightly lower impact while the lowest effect was observed in case of the Acetone extract.


Gupta M.,Institute of Post | Shaw B.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research
Iranian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research | Year: 2011

Asparagus racemosus Willd. has repeatedly been mentioned as a galactogogue in Ayurvedic literature and has been confirmed through animal experiments as well. This randomized double-blind clinical trial evaluates its galactogogue effect in 60 lactating mothers by measurement of changes in their prolactin hormone level during the study. Several secondary parameters namely mothers' weight, babies' weight, subjective satisfaction of mothers and well-being and happiness of babies were studied to corroborate the primary findings. The oral administration of the research drug led to more than three-fold increase in the prolactin hormone level of the subjects in the research group as compared to the control group. The primary findings were corroborated by the secondary outcome measures and were found to be statistically significant (p < 0.05). © 2011 by School of Pharmacy.


Sasmal S.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | Majumdar S.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | Gupta M.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research | Mukherjee A.,University of Calcutta
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine | Year: 2012

Objective: To conduct a systemic evaluation of the medicinal value of seeds which include macroscopic and microscopic characterization, physiochemical evaluation, preliminary phytochemical screening and experimental antipyretic activity. Methods: Saraca asoca seed was studied for pharmacognostical, phytochemical and other recommended methods for standardizations. Also, the acetone extract of the seeds was evaluated for acute toxicity study and antipyretic activity using Brewer's yeast induced pyrexia in Wistar rats at oral doses of 300 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg. Results: After phytochemical screening, the acetone extract showed the presence of saponin, tannins and flavonoids which inhibit pyrexia. The therapeutic efficacy achieved at both the dose levels of the research drug and standard drug aspirin (100 mg/kg) showed significant (. P<0.01) antipyretic activity when compared to the control group. The highly significant antipyretic effect exhibited at the dose of 500 mg/kg was also found to be sustainable in nature. Conclusion: The antipyretic effect of the acetone extract showed significant results in rats at the dose of 500 mg/kg after following the standard pharmacognostical and phytochemical methods. © 2012 Asian Pacific Tropical Biomedical Magazine.


Sarkar P.K.,Jb Roy State Ayurvedic Medical College And Hospital | Chaudhari S.,Jb Roy State Ayurvedic Medical College And Hospital | Chattopadhyay A.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research
Drug Metabolism and Drug Interactions | Year: 2013

Ayurvedic medicines are available in the market as over-the-counter products. Today people use prescription and nonprescription medicines along with Ayurvedic medicines for quick relief from ailments. In the ancient texts of Ayurveda, the concept of interactions with various examples of food interactions and food-drug interactions are mentioned. Recent studies and publications reported drug interactions of Ayurveda medicines and modern drugs. In the present review article, the concept of interactions mentioned in the Ayurvedic texts along with the examples of food interactions, food-drug interactions and the recent research work and publications indicating the interactions of the Ayurvedic drugs and drug interactions of Ayurvedic medicines and modern drugs are compiled. This will help the consumer of the prescription and nonprescription medicines with the Ayurvedic medicines to be cautious about the probable interactions.


Gupta M.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research
International Journal of Food Properties | Year: 2010

Indian spices that provide flavor, color, and aroma to food also possess many therapeutic properties. Ancient Indian texts of Ayurveda, an Indian system of medicine, detailed the medicinal properties of these plants and their therapeutic usage. Recent scientific research has established the presence of many active compounds in these spices that are known to possess specific pharmacological properties. The therapeutic efficacy of these individual spices for specific pharmacological actions has also been established by experimental and clinical studies. The medicinal effects traditionally ascribed to Indian spices are validated by modern pharmacological and experimental techniques, thus providing a scientific rationale to their traditional therapeutic usage. Copyright © 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Gupta M.,Institute of Post Graduate Ayurvedic Education and Research
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2010

Degenerative physiological changes related to old-age are increasing world over. These geriatric diseases affect almost all vital body systems. The rejuvenating and preventive therapy called Rasayana therapy in Ayurvedic system of Indian medicine deals with prevention, amelioration and cure of geriatric ailments by increasing overall body immunity, fighting infections & antigens, and preventing carcinogenic mutations. A specific polyherbal preparation called Triphala, which consists of equal amounts of fruits of three plants namely Terminalia chebula Retz., Terminalia bellirica Roxb. and Emblica officinalis Gaertn. in fine powder form, has been specifically mentioned in traditional Ayurvedic texts for its beneficial effects in geriatric diseases. It contains tannins, phenols and glycosides which are responsible for its strong antioxidant activity apart from its immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimutagenic properties. These attributes make Triphala an effective remedy for geriatric degenerative diseases.

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