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Cascella V.,University of Ferrara | Giordano P.,University of Ferrara | Hatzopoulos S.,University of Ferrara | Petruccelli J.,Worcester Polytechnic Institute | And 6 more authors.
Medical Science Monitor | Year: 2012

Background: Data from animal studies show that antioxidants can compensate against noise-induced stress and sensory hair cell death. The aim of this study was to evaluate the otoprotection efficacy of various versions of orally administered Acuval 400® against noise damage in a rat animal model. Material/Methods: Fifty-five Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: A) noise-exposed animals; B) animals exposed to noise and treated with the Acuval; C) animals exposed to noise and treated with a combination of Coenzyme Q10 and Acuval; D) animals treated only with Acuval and Coenzyme Q10 and with no exposure to noise. All solutions were administered orally 5 times: 24 and 2 hrs prior to noise exposure, and then daily for 3 days. The auditory function was assessed by measuring auditory brainstem responses (ABR) in the range from 2 to 32 kHz at times =1, 7, 14 and 21 days after noise exposure. Results: At low frequencies (click and 4 kHz) animals from both A and B groups showed significant threshold shifts in the majority of the tested frequencies and tested times. For the same frequencies, animals from group C presented threshold levels similar to those from group D. At frequencies ≥8 kHz the protective performance of the 2 Acuval groups is more clearly distinguished from the noise group A. At 32 kHz the 2 Acuval groups perform equally well in terms of otoprotection. Animals in Group D did not show any significant differences in the hearing threshold during the experiment. Conclusions: The data of this study suggest that a solution containing Coenzyme Q10 and Acuval 400®, administered orally, protects from noise-induced hearing loss. © Med Sci Monit, 2012.


Ciorba A.,University of Ferrara | Hatzopoulos S.,University of Ferrara | Bianchini C.,University of Ferrara | Iannini V.,University of Ferrara | And 3 more authors.
Acta Otorhinolaryngologica Italica | Year: 2015

Previous studies have suggested that risk factors for ischaemic vascular disease, such as cigarette smoking, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia, can also be considered risk factors for the development of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). In this study, we have evaluated the hypothesis that these factors can influence hearing threshold recovery in patients affected by ISSNHL. A total of 141 subjects who suffered an episode of ISSNHL were included. All subjects were assessed with tonal audiometry, auditory brainstem responses and MRI to exclude retrocochlear pathology. Hearing tests were conducted at ISSNHL onset (t = 0) and after 30 days. Patients were divided into three classes according to the presence/absence of one or more cardiovascular risk factors including: history of smoking, total serum cholesterol/triglycerides, history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Values of hearing threshold recovery were estimated and comparisons were conducted across the three risk factor classes. 75% of patients affected by ISSNHL showed a threshold recovery. However, the threshold recovery was found to be class-independent (average recovery value of 18 dB HL per classes) and also independent of age and gender. Even if cardiovascular risk factors have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of ISSNHL, the present study suggests that these factors do not have any significant influence on the threshold recovery in ISSNHL. © 2015, Pacini Editore S.p.A. All Rights Reserved.


Ciorba A.,University of Ferrara | Hatzopoulos S.,University of Ferrara | Petruccelli J.,Worcester Polytechnic Institute | Mazzoli M.,University of Ferrara | And 5 more authors.
Acta Otorhinolaryngologica Italica | Year: 2013

To compare objective and subjective protocols assessing hearing loss in young children and evaluate frequency-specific hearing impairment through a comparison between auditory steady state responses (ASSR), auditory brainstem responses (ABR), transient otoacoustic emissions and conditioned orientation reflex responses (COR). Thirty-five hearing-impaired children (20 male and 15 female), aged between 14 months and 4 years, participated in the study. Hearing threshold levels and peripheral auditory function were assessed by measurements of ABR, ASSR, otoacoustic emissions and COR. The analysis of the COR and ASSR variables showed significant correlations in the majority of tested frequencies. The data highlight a characteristic of the COR procedure, which is an underestimation of the hearing threshold in comparison to the ASSR estimate. The data show that the COR threshold assessment follows the pattern of the other two established electrophysiological methods (ABR, ASSR). The correlation analyses did not permit evaluation of the precision of these estimates. Considering that the ASSR variables show a better relationship with ABR (higher correlation values) than COR, it might be advantageous to utilize the ASSR to gain frequency-specific information.


PubMed | Institute of Pathology and Physiology of Hearing and University of Ferrara
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Acta otorhinolaryngologica Italica : organo ufficiale della Societa italiana di otorinolaringologia e chirurgia cervico-facciale | Year: 2015

Previous studies have suggested that risk factors for ischaemic vascular disease, such as cigarette smoking, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia, can also be considered risk factors for the development of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). In this study, we have evaluated the hypothesis that these factors can influence hearing threshold recovery in patients affected by ISSNHL. A total of 141 subjects who suffered an episode of ISSNHL were included. All subjects were assessed with tonal audiometry, auditory brainstem responses and MRI to exclude retrocochlear pathology. Hearing tests were conducted at ISSNHL onset (t = 0) and after 30 days. Patients were divided into three classes according to the presence/absence of one or more cardiovascular risk factors including: history of smoking, total serum cholesterol/triglycerides, history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Values of hearing threshold recovery were estimated and comparisons were conducted across the three risk factor classes. 75% of patients affected by ISSNHL showed a threshold recovery. However, the threshold recovery was found to be class-independent (average recovery value of 18 dB HL per classes) and also independent of age and gender. Even if cardiovascular risk factors have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of ISSNHL, the present study suggests that these factors do not have any significant influence on the threshold recovery in ISSNHL.

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