Institute of Orthopaedics

Lanzhou, China

Institute of Orthopaedics

Lanzhou, China
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Zhou J.,Institute of Orthopaedics | Ming L.-G.,Institute of Orthopaedics | Ge B.-F.,Institute of Orthopaedics | Wang J.-Q.,Institute of Orthopaedics | And 5 more authors.
Bone | Year: 2011

Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) have been used clinically to slow down osteoporosis and promote fracture healing for many years. However, the underlying action mechanisms and optimal parameters of the EMF applications are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of treatment for different durations with 50. Hz sinusoidal electromagnetic fields (SEMFs) at different intensities on proliferation, differentiation and mineralization potentials of rat osteoblasts. Osteoblasts isolated from neonatal rats were treated with SEMFs (50. Hz at 0.9 mT-4.8 mT, 0.3 mT interval, 30. min/day up to 15. days). Compared to untreated control, SEMFs inhibited osteoblast proliferation (after 3. days' treatment) but increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (after treatment for 9. days) from 0.9 mT to 1.8 mT, declined from 1.8. mT until 3.0 mT, and then increased again from 3.0 mT to 3.6 mT and decreased once again from 3.6 mT to 4.8 mT. Numbers of colonies stained positive for ALP after 8. days and mineralized nodules stained by Alizarin red after 10. days showed the same bimodal tendency as with the ALP activity, with two peaks at 1.8. mT and 3.6. mT. SEMFs also bimodally increased Runx-2, Col1-2 and Bmp-2 mRNA expression levels in osteoblasts at 12, 24 and 96. h after exposure. The results indicated that while exposure to 50. Hz SEMFs inhibits the osteoblast proliferation, it significantly promotes differentiation and mineralization potentials of osteoblasts in an intensity-dependent manner with peak activity at 1.8 mT and 3.6 mT. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Bailey A.K.,Institute of Orthopaedics | Minshull C.,Queen Margaret University | Richardson J.,Institute of Orthopaedics | Gleeson N.P.,Queen Margaret University
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation | Year: 2014

Context: Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) aims to restore hyaline cartilage. Traditionally, ACI rehabilitation is prescribed in a concurrent (CON) format. However, it is well known from studies in asymptomatic populations that CON training produces an interference effect that can attenuate strength gains. Strength is integral to joint function, so adopting a nonconcurrent (N-CON) approach to ACI rehabilitation might improve outcomes. Objective: To assess changes in function and neuromuscular performance during 48 wk of CON and N-CON physical rehabilitation after ACI to the knee. Setting: Orthopedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. Design: Randomized control, pilot study. Participants: 11 patients (9 male, 2 female age 32.3 ± 6.6 y; body mass 79.3 ±10.4 kg; time from injury to surgery 7.1 ± 4.9 mo [mean ± SD]) randomly allocated to N-CON:CON (2:1). Interventions: Standardized CON and N-CON physiotherapy that involved separation of strength and cardiovascular-endurance conditioning. Main Outcome Measures: Function in the single-leg-hop test, patient-reported outcomes (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [KOOS], International Knee Documentation Committee subjective questionnaire [IKDC]), and neuromuscular outcomes of peak force (PF), rate of force development (RFD), electromechanical delay (EMD), and sensorimotor performance (force error [FE]) of the knee extensors and flexors of the injured and noninjured legs, measured presurgery and at 6, 12, 24, and 48 wk postsurgery. Results: Factorial ANOVAs with repeated measures of group by leg and by test occasion revealed significantly superior improvements for KOOS, IKDC, PF, EMD, and FE associated with N-CON vs CON rehabilitation (F1.5,13.4 GG = 3.7-4.7, P < .05). These results confirm increased peak effectiveness of N-CON rehabilitation (~4.5-13.3% better than CON over 48 wk of rehabilitation). N-CON and CON showed similar patterns of improvement for single-leg-hop test and RFD. Conclusions: Nonconcurrent strength and cardiovascular-endurance conditioning during 48 wk of rehabilitation after ACI surgery elicited significantly greater improvements to functional and neuromuscular outcomes than did contemporary concurrent rehabilitation. © 2014 Human Kinetics, Inc.


Kim H.J.,Hospital for Special Surgery | Piyaskulkaew C.,Institute of Orthopaedics | Riew K.D.,Washington University in St. Louis
Spine | Year: 2014

STUDY DESIGN.: Description of surgical technique with case series. OBJECTIVE.: To describe the surgical management of fixed cervical deformities using an anterior osteotomy of the cervical spine. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Although posteriorly based osteotomies of the cervical spine have been described in the past, there are no reports of the surgical technique for performing an anterior osteotomy of the cervical spine for fixed cervical deformities. METHODS.: Description of a single surgeon 1/4s technique for performing an anterior cervical osteotomy and his experience in performing this technique from 2000 to 2010 in a consecutive series of patients. Demographics, operative details, and clinical/radiographical outcomes were collected. The cohort was separated into 2 groups. Group 1 had anterior osteotomy only with or without posterior instrumentation whereas group 2 had anterior osteotomy and Smith-Petersen osteotomies with posterior instrumentation. RESULTS.: A total of 38 patients (group 1 = 17, group 2 = 21) underwent an anterior osteotomy in the study period with an average follow-up of 3.4 years (range, 1.0-6.3 yr). All but 7 cases were revision cases. Group 1 had shorter length of surgery and less estimated blood loss than group 2 (length of surgery 220 vs. 313 min, P < 0.01; estimated blood loss 189 vs. 294 mL, P = 0.02).The mean angular correction achieved in group 1 was less than that of group 2, although not statistically significant (23° vs. 33°, P = 0.15). There was less mean translational correction achieved in group 1 compared with group 2 (1.3 vs. 3.7 cm, P = 0.03). Both groups had improvements in the neck disability index with surgery and were similar between groups (20 vs. 19.7, P = 0.78). There were no neurological complications or intraoperative neuromonitoring changes in either group. CONCLUSION.: The use of an anterior osteotomy in the cervical spine is safe and effective for the correction of fixed deformities of the cervical spine. When necessary, Smith-Petersen osteotomies can add to the angular and translational correction to achieve a satisfying outcome for patients.Level of Evidence: 4. Copyright © 2014 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Zhai Y.-K.,Institute of Orthopaedics | Chen K.-M.,Institute of Orthopaedics | Ge B.-F.,Institute of Orthopaedics | Ma H.-P.,General Hospital of Lanzhou | And 2 more authors.
Yaoxue Xuebao | Year: 2011

This study is to investigate the effects on the expression of iNOS and production of NO in the osteogenic differentiation process of rat bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) by icariside II. rBMSCs were cultured by adherence screening method. When the culture dishes were covered with 80% cells, the osteogenic induced cultures were adopted. Icariside II was supplemented into the culture at 1×10-5 mol·L-1. The activity of iNOS, content of NO and osteogenic differentiation markers including alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, CFU-FALP and mineralized bone nodules were compared among the icariside II-supplemented group, L-NMAE group, icariside II + L-NAME group and the control. Total RNA was isolated and the gene expression of iNOS, Osterix and Runx-2 was investigated by real-time PCR. Total protein was also isolated and the secretion of iNOS and collagen I was examined by Western blotting. Icariside II can significantly improved ALP activity, CFU-FALP amount and mineralized nodules. Besides, the mRNA level of factors related to the osteogenic differentiation includes Osterix and Runx-2 also enhanced. The secretion of collagen I also promoted significantly. But all of these effects can be inhibited by L-NAME which can specifically inhibit the activity of iNOS. Icariside II enhances the osteogenic differentiation of rBMSCs significantly, but if the activity of iNOS was blocked by L-NAME, the osteogenic differentiation markers decrease accompanied with iNOS and NO decrease, suggesting that icariside II stimulates the osteogenic differentiation via enhancing the activity of iNOS and promoting the generation of NO.


Chaudhary S.,Institute of Orthopaedics
BMJ Case Reports | Year: 2014

Cysticercosis is a disease caused by tapeworm Taenia solium. It is commonly found in developing countries, but reports of its frequent occurrences even in developed countries due to immigrants from infected areas are widely reported. When cysticercosis affects the brain, the condition is commonly called neurocysticercosis however, sporadic cases of solitary intramuscular cysticercosis have been reported in the literature. We present a case of solitary cysticercosis in the right deltoid muscle in a 25- year-old woman who presented with a painful swelling on the right shoulder. The diagnosis was established by MRI and targetedultrasonography. Surgical removal of a cyst followed by 2 weeks of albendazole treatment resolved the symptoms. Copyright 2014 BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Institute of Orthopaedics
Type: | Journal: BMJ case reports | Year: 2014

Cysticercosis is a disease caused by tapeworm Taenia solium. It is commonly found in developing countries, but reports of its frequent occurrences even in developed countries due to immigrants from infected areas are widely reported. When cysticercosis affects the brain, the condition is commonly called neurocysticercosis however, sporadic cases of solitary intramuscular cysticercosis have been reported in the literature. We present a case of solitary cysticercosis in the right deltoid muscle in a 25-year-old woman who presented with a painful swelling on the right shoulder. The diagnosis was established by MRI and targetedultrasonography. Surgical removal of a cyst followed by 2weeks of albendazole treatment resolved the symptoms.

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