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Maria A.,Institute of Medical Education and Research PGIMER | Dasgupta R.,Jawaharlal Nehru University
Indian Journal of Community Medicine | Year: 2016

Family-centered care (FCC) for sick newborns is emerging as a paradigmatic shift in the practice of facility-based newborn care. It seeks to transforming a provider-centered model into a client-centered one and thus build a new therapeutic alliance. FCC is the cornerstone of continuum of care, imparting caregiving competencies to parents/caregivers both within institutions as well as after the discharge. This has potential gains for the newborn, family members, and facility-level staff. The initial model piloted in tertiary-care settings is now undergoing translation at five sites across the country; the outcomes are keenly awaited. © 2016 Indian Journal of Community Medicine.


Yadav T.P.,Institute of Medical Education and Research PGIMER
Journal, Indian Academy of Clinical Medicine | Year: 2013

Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia may be idiopathic or secondary to various causes and cold and warm antibody mediated. We report a case of cold agglutinin positive autoimmune haemolytic anaemia which was diagnosed to be due to Klebsiella infection after ruling-out other causes that have been reported earlier. The patient continued to have haemolysis even after treatment of the underlying infection, intravenous methylprednisolone pulse and intravenous immunoglobulin. He responded to plasmapheresis with resolution of haemolysis and there was no further need of haemolysis.


Sodhi K.S.,Institute of Medical Education and Research PGIMER | Lee E.Y.,Harvard University
Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics | Year: 2014

The repeated use of CT imaging raises a child's radiation exposure, overall radiation accrual and future cancer risks. However, our review suggests that these risks can be considerably reduced by physicians, radiologists and academic bodies, through proper justification, optimisation and dose limitation. Conclusion Computed tomography poses a potential risk of radiation-induced cancer in children. The physician must weigh up the overall risks and benefits of CT before referring a child for imaging. ©2014 Foundation Acta Pædiatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Aggarwal A.,Institute of Medical Education and Research PGIMER | Harjeet,Institute of Medical Education and Research PGIMER | Sahni D.,Institute of Medical Education and Research PGIMER
Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy | Year: 2010

Background The aim of this study was to classify the different patterns of cutaneous nerves found on the dorsum of foot in Indian fetuses and compare them with patterns found in other population groups. Methods A total of 60 lower limbs from 30 fetuses (19 male, 11 female) were dissected and the branching patterns of nerves were sketched and specimens photographed. Results Six main types and few subtypes of innervation patterns were found. Type 1 (53.3%): deep peroneal nerve supplied the 1st cleft, lateral dorsal cutaneous nerve supplied the lateral border of little toe and the remaining part of the dorsum of the foot is supplied by superficial peroneal nerve. Type 2 (28.3%): deep peroneal nerve supplied the 1st cleft, superficial peroneal nerve supplied the medial border of big toe, 2nd cleft and lateral 21/2 digits supplied by the lateral dorsal cutaneous nerve. Type 3 (8.3%): deep peroneal nerve supplied the 1st cleft, lateral 11/2 digits supplied by the lateral dorsal cutaneous nerve and the remaining dorsum by superficial peroneal nerve. Type 4 (3.3%): deep peroneal nerve supplied the 1st and 2nd clefts, superficial peroneal nerve supplied the medial border of great toe, lateral 21/2 digits were supplied by lateral dorsal cutaneous nerve. Type 5 (5%): deep peroneal nerve supplied 1st and 2nd clefts, lateral border of the little toe by lateral dorsal cutaneous nerve and remaining part of the dorsum of foot by superficial peroneal nerve. Type 6 (1.7%): deep peroneal nerve supplied 2nd cleft, lateral border of little toe supplied by the lateral dorsal cutaneous nerve and the remaining area by superficial peroneal nerve. Conclusions A comparison with cutaneous innervation patterns found in other population groups revealed three new variants which have not been reported in the other populations. © Springer-Verlag 2009.


Lawrence S.,University of Hertfordshire | Sokhi R.,University of Hertfordshire | Ravindra K.,Institute of Medical Education and Research PGIMER
Environmental Pollution | Year: 2016

Road tunnels act like large laboratories; they provide an excellent environment to quantify atmospheric particles emission factors from exhaust and non-exhaust sources due to their known boundary conditions. Current work compares the High Volume, Dichotomous Stacked Filter Unit and Partisol Air Sampler for coarse, PM10 and PM2.5 particle concentration measurement and found that they do not differ significantly (p = 95%). PM2.5 fraction contributes 66% of PM10 proportions and significantly influenced by traffic (turbulence) and meteorological conditions. Mass emission factors for PM10 varies from 21.3 ± 1.9 to 28.8 ± 3.4 mg/vkm and composed of Motorcycle (0.0003-0.001 mg/vkm), Cars (26.1-33.4 mg/vkm), LDVs (2.4-3.0 mg/vkm), HDVs (2.2-2.8 mg/vkm) and Buses (0.1 mg/vkm). Based on Lawrence et al. (2013), source apportionment modelling, the PM10 emission of brake wear (3.8-4.4 mg/vkm), petrol exhaust (3.9-4.5 mg/vkm), diesel exhaust (7.2-8.3 mg/vkm), re-suspension (9-10.4 mg/vkm), road surface wear (3.9-4.5 mg/vkm), and unexplained (7.2 mg/vkm) were also calculated. The current study determined that the combined non-exhaust fleet PM10 emission factor (16.7-19.3 mg/vkm) are higher than the combined exhaust emission factor (11.1-12.8 mg/vkm). Thus, highlight the significance of non-exhaust emissions and the need for legislation and abatement strategies to reduce their contributions to ambient PM concentrations. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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