Institute Of Mecanique Celeste Et Of Calcul Des Ephemerides Observatoire Of Paris

Paris, France

Institute Of Mecanique Celeste Et Of Calcul Des Ephemerides Observatoire Of Paris

Paris, France
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Rudawska R.,Institute Of Mecanique Celeste Et Of Calcul Des Ephemerides Observatoire Of Paris | Vaubaillon J.,Institute Of Mecanique Celeste Et Of Calcul Des Ephemerides Observatoire Of Paris | Atreya P.,Arecibo Observatory
Astronomy and Astrophysics | Year: 2012

Context. The main problem in establishing a parent body for a meteoroid stream is the choice of a reliable meteoroid stream identification method. There are several identification methods based on three components: a dynamical similarity function, a threshold value, and meteoroid stream search algorithm. Aims. The French Meteor Network, developed in the CABERNET project (PODET-MET), will soon provide a large amount of meteor observation data aiming to establish a parent body for each observed meteor. We therefore aim to obtain the value of the upper limit to the criteria that we can later use for data provided by the French Meteor Network. Methods. We tested four D-criteria, using artificial data sets for which the parent body is known. We obtained threshold values and applied them to the Armagh Observatory meteor database. A detailed comparison is made between a similarity function based on the orbital elements and the function defined by quasi-invariants. Results. We detected major meteoroid streams in the Armagh Observatory meteor database. A few meteors were also found to be associated with the asteroid 2005 UW6-an asteroids not considered as a possible parent body for Taurid complex before. However, the problem of finding the appropriate threshold value that would work with all meteoroid streams is still open. © 2012 ESO.


Rudawska R.,Comenius University | Vaubaillon J.,Institute Of Mecanique Celeste Et Of Calcul Des Ephemerides Observatoire Of Paris
Planetary and Space Science | Year: 2015

Asteroid 3552 Don Quixote (1983 SA) orbits the Sun on an orbit that resembles that of a short-period comet. This, together with its recently observed cometary activity, makes it a good candidate for a parent body of a meteor shower. Model calculations show that the particles originated from Don Quixote pass close enough to Earth orbit to search for a meteor shower activity. Corresponding meteor showers were found in CAMS (Rudawska and Jenniskens, 2014) and EDMOND (Kornoš et al., 2014) video observations. The κ Lyrids and August μ Draconids (IAU#464 and IAU#470, respectively), a similarly inclined stream active in the summer, are associated with 3552 Don Quixote. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Koten P.,Czech Republic Astronomical Institute | Vaubaillon J.,Institute Of Mecanique Celeste Et Of Calcul Des Ephemerides Observatoire Of Paris | Toth J.,Comenius University | Margonis A.,TU Berlin | Duris F.,Comenius University
Earth, Moon and Planets | Year: 2014

A Draconid meteor shower outburst was observed from on board two scientific aircraft deployed above Northern Europe on 8th October 2011. The activity profile was measured using a set of photographic and video cameras. The main peak of the activity occurred around 20:15 ± 0:0.5 UT which is consistent with the model prediction as well as with the IMO network visual observations. The corrected hourly rates reached a value of almost 350. The brighter meteors peaked about 15-20 min earlier than the dimmer ones. This difference can be explained by different directions of the ejection of the meteoroids from the parent comet. One of the instruments was even able to detect meteors connected with the material ejected from the parent comet before 1900 and thus confirmed the prediction of the model, although it was based on uncertain pre-1900 cometary data. Another small peak of the activity, which was caused by material ejected during the 1926 perihelion passage of the parent comet, was detected around 21:10 UT. The mass distribution index determined using the narrow field-of-view video camera was 2.0 ± 0.1. This work shows that the observation of meteor outbursts can constrain the orbital elements, outgassing activity and existence of jets at the surface of a comet. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Rudawska R.,Institute Of Mecanique Celeste Et Of Calcul Des Ephemerides Observatoire Of Paris | Zender J.,European Space Agency | Jenniskens P.,Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute | Vaubaillon J.,Institute Of Mecanique Celeste Et Of Calcul Des Ephemerides Observatoire Of Paris | And 5 more authors.
Earth, Moon and Planets | Year: 2014

Some past October Draconid shower meteoroids fell apart in a spray of fragments at the end of their trajectory before slowing down, from which it was concluded that these were among the most fragile meteoroids known. In those instances, the dust could not be reliably traced to a particular return of the parent comet 21P/Giaconini-Zinner. On October 8th, 2011, Earth was predicted to transverse the 1900 A.D. dust ejecta of the comet. In 1900, the comet's perihelion distance first moved significantly inwards to the Sun and ejection conditions could have been unusual. An airborne observing campaign was organized, with several teams contributing imaging and spectrographic cameras to study the manner in which these meteoroids released the volatile element sodium during the ablation process in the Earth's atmosphere. IMCCE, ESA, and the SETI Institute contributed spectrographic cameras based on low-light WATEC 902H2 Ultimate, low-light LCC1, and GenII XX1332 image intensified cameras. An outburst was observed, much as predicted. Despite a lack of bright meteors, a total of 15 Draconid spectra were recorded. All show evidence of an early release of sodium. The loss of sodium was observed to coincide with the formation of a distinct wake of fragments. The observations show that 21P/Giacobini-Zinner ejected fragile meteoroids during the return in 1900. Those grains may have lost some sodium even before impacting Earth. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

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