Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt

Vientiane, Laos

Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt

Vientiane, Laos

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PubMed | IRSTEA, Montpellier University, Ban Nogviengkham, Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt and 4 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PLoS neglected tropical diseases | Year: 2016

The global burden of diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In montane areas of South-East Asia such as northern Laos, recent changes in land use have induced increased runoff, soil erosion and in-stream suspended sediment loads, and potential pathogen dissemination. To our knowledge, few studies have related diarrhea incidences to catchment scale hydrological factors such as river discharge, and loads of suspended sediment and of Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB) such as Escherichia coli, together with sociological factors such as hygiene practices. We hypothesized that climate factors combined with human behavior control diarrhea incidence, either because higher rainfall, leading to higher stream discharges, suspended sediment loads and FIB counts, are associated with higher numbers of reported diarrhea cases during the rainy season, or because water shortage leads to the use of less safe water sources during the dry season. Using E. coli as a FIB, the objectives of this study were thus (1) to characterize the epidemiological dynamics of diarrhea in Northern Laos, and (2) to identify which hydro-meteorological and sociological risk factors were associated with diarrhea epidemics.Considering two unconnected river catchments of 22 and 7,448 km2, respectively, we conducted a retrospective time series analysis of meteorological variables (rainfall, air temperature), hydrological variables (discharge, suspended sediments, FIB counts, water temperature), and the number of diarrheal disease cases reported at 6 health centers located in the 5 southern districts of the Luang Prabang Province, Lao PDR. We also examined the socio-demographic factors potentially affecting vulnerability to the effect of the climate factors, such as drinking water sources, hygiene habits, and recreational water exposure.Using thus a mixed methods approach, we found E. coli to be present all year long (100-1,000 Most Probable Number or MPN 100 mL-1) indicating that fecal contamination is ubiquitous and constant. We found that populations switch their water supply from wells to surface water during drought periods, the latter of which appear to be at higher risk of bacterial contamination than municipal water fountains. We thus found that water shortage in the Luang Prabang area triggers diarrhea peaks during the dry and hot season and that rainfall and aquifer refill ends the epidemic during the wet season. The temporal trends of reported daily diarrhea cases were generally bimodal with hospital admissions peaking in February-March and later in May-July. Annual incidence rates were higher in more densely populated areas and mostly concerned the 0-4 age group and male patients.We found that anthropogenic drivers, such as hygiene practices, were at least as important as environmental drivers in determining the seasonal pattern of a diarrhea epidemic. For diarrheal disease risk monitoring, discharge or groundwater level can be considered as relevant proxies. These variables should be monitored in the framework of an early warning system provided that a tradeoff is found between the size of the monitored catchment and the frequency of the measurement.


Objective To assess the antibiotic prescribing practices of doctors working in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic and their knowledge of local antibiotic resistance patterns. Methods Doctors attending morning meetings in 25 public hospitals in four provinces were asked to complete a knowledge, attitude and practice survey. The questionnaire contained 43 multiple choice questions that the doctor answered at the time of the meeting. Findings The response rate was 83.4% (386/463). Two hundred and seventy doctors (59.8%) declared that they had insufficient information about antibiotics. Only 14.0% (54/386) recognized the possibility of cephalosporin cross-resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Most participants had no information about local antibiotic resistance for Salmonella Typhi (211/385, 54.8%) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (253/384, 65.9%). Unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions were considered as harmless by 115 participants and 148 considered locally-available generic antibiotics to be of poor quality. Nearly three-quarters (280/386) of participants agreed that it was difficult to select the correct antibiotics. Most participants (373/386) welcomed educational programmes on antibiotic prescribing and 65.0% (249/383) preferred local over international antibiotic guidelines. Conclusion Doctors in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic seem to favour antibiotic prescribing interventions. Health authorities should consider a capacity building programme that incorporates antibiotic prescribing and hospital infection control. © 2015, World Health Organization. All Rights Reserved.


Stoesser N.,University of Oxford | Xayaheuang S.,Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt | Xayaheuang S.,Lao Oxford Mahosot Hospital Wellcome Trust Research Unit | Vongsouvath M.,Lao Oxford Mahosot Hospital Wellcome Trust Research Unit | And 12 more authors.
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy | Year: 2014

Objectives: Intestinal carriage constitutes an important reservoir of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, with some of the highest rates reported from Asia. Antibiotic resistance has been little studied in Laos, where some antibiotics are available without restriction, but others such as carbapenems are not available. Patients and methods: We collected stools from 397 healthy children in 12 randomly selected pre-school childcare facilities in and around Vientiane. Colonization with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBLE) and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) was detected using a disc diffusion screening test and ESBLE were characterized using WGS. Risk factor data were collected by questionnaire. Results: Ninety-two children (23%) were colonized with ESBLE, mainly Escherichia coli carrying blaCTX-M and Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying blaSHV or blaCTX-M, which were frequently resistant to multiple antibiotic classes. Although residence in Vientiane Capital, foreign travel, higher maternal level of education, antibiotic use in the preceding 3 months and attending a childcare facility with a 'good' level of hygiene were all associated with ESBLE colonization on univariable analysis, a significant association remained only for antibiotic use when a stepwise approach was used with a multivariate random-effects model. WGS analysis suggested transmission in both childcare facilities and community settings. Conclusions: The high prevalence of paediatric colonization with ESBLE in Laos, one of the highest reported in Asia, is probably the result of inappropriate antibiotic use. Paediatric colonization with CPE was not identified in this study, but it is important to continue to monitor the spread of antibiotic-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Laos. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Fondation Merieux, Limoges University Hospital Center, Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt, Institute of Tropical Medicine and 2 more.
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Bulletin of the World Health Organization | Year: 2015

To assess the antibiotic prescribing practices of doctors working in the Lao Peoples Democratic Republic and their knowledge of local antibiotic resistance patterns.Doctors attending morning meetings in 25 public hospitals in four provinces were asked to complete a knowledge, attitude and practice survey. The questionnaire contained 43 multiple choice questions that the doctor answered at the time of the meeting.The response rate was 83.4% (386/463). Two hundred and seventy doctors (59.8%) declared that they had insufficient information about antibiotics. Only 14.0% (54/386) recognized the possibility of cephalosporin cross-resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Most participants had no information about local antibiotic resistance for Salmonella Typhi (211/385, 54.8%) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (253/384, 65.9%). Unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions were considered as harmless by 115 participants and 148 considered locally-available generic antibiotics to be of poor quality. Nearly three-quarters (280/386) of participants agreed that it was difficult to select the correct antibiotics. Most participants (373/386) welcomed educational programmes on antibiotic prescribing and 65.0% (249/383) preferred local over international antibiotic guidelines.Doctors in the Lao Peoples Democratic Republic seem to favour antibiotic prescribing interventions. Health authorities should consider a capacity building programme that incorporates antibiotic prescribing and hospital infection control.


PubMed | Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt, National Health Research Institute, Lao Peoples Democratic Republic Lao Oxford Mahosot Hospital Wellcome Trust Research Unit, Mahidol University and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy | Year: 2015

Intestinal carriage constitutes an important reservoir of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, with some of the highest rates reported from Asia. Antibiotic resistance has been little studied in Laos, where some antibiotics are available without restriction, but others such as carbapenems are not available.We collected stools from 397 healthy children in 12 randomly selected pre-school childcare facilities in and around Vientiane. Colonization with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBLE) and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) was detected using a disc diffusion screening test and ESBLE were characterized using WGS. Risk factor data were collected by questionnaire.Ninety-two children (23%) were colonized with ESBLE, mainly Escherichia coli carrying blaCTX-M and Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying blaSHV or blaCTX-M, which were frequently resistant to multiple antibiotic classes. Although residence in Vientiane Capital, foreign travel, higher maternal level of education, antibiotic use in the preceding 3 months and attending a childcare facility with a good level of hygiene were all associated with ESBLE colonization on univariable analysis, a significant association remained only for antibiotic use when a stepwise approach was used with a multivariate random-effects model. WGS analysis suggested transmission in both childcare facilities and community settings.The high prevalence of paediatric colonization with ESBLE in Laos, one of the highest reported in Asia, is probably the result of inappropriate antibiotic use. Paediatric colonization with CPE was not identified in this study, but it is important to continue to monitor the spread of antibiotic-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Laos.


Nguyen T.,Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt | Luu L.,Institute Pasteur Of Ho Chi Minh Ville | Vu T.,Institute Pasteur Of Ho Chi Minh Ville | Buisson Y.,Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt
Bulletin de la Societe de Pathologie Exotique | Year: 2011

Dengue has emerged in Vietnam 50 years ago and since has become endemo-epidemic throughout the whole country. Each year, major epidemics of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) hit South Vietnam during the rainy season, causing significant morbidity and mortality, especially among young children. The only preventive measure is vector control, but it is often implemented too late or indiscriminately. The aim of this study was to investigate, in the pre-epidemic stage, the existence of significant changes in vector indices, which will predict DF/DHF outbreaks. We conducted a descriptive transversal study, repeated once a month for four months (March to June) in the village of Locthuan (province Ben Tre) in the Mekong's delta. Adult mosquitoes were caught in 30 houses, and larvae were collected in water holding containers of 50 houses. The houses were randomly selected. Vector densities were calculated according to the indices recommended by WHO. Virological analysis was carried out on lots of female Aedes and larvae in order to determine viral infection rates. Catches of adult mosquitoes collected 496 specimens including 329 Aedes, 139 Culex and 28 Anopheles. Aedes aegypti was present in 63% of visited homes that is an average density of 1.8 mosquitoes per house. The increase in imaginal indices during the 4 months was not significant. The survey of breeding sites of Ae. aegypti identified 1292 water containers in which 71,569 larval specimens were collected. The values of house index, container index [CI] and Breteau index [BI] increased each month, the latter from 166 to 442. This increase was significant for CI and BI. Breeding sites were mostly intra-home, mainly consisting of large and small ceramic jars. Larval density of Ae. aegypti in the containers also increased significantly over the 4 months. It was correlated with the lack of cover and predators such as Mesocyclops spp., Micronecta spp. and larvivorous fishes. Cultivation of 15 pools of 10 adult females and 29 pools of larvae (ie 1088 specimens) of Ae. aegypti failed to isolate dengue virus. The high Stegomyia indices measured in this South Vietnamese village and their increase before the rainy season reflect a situation at high risk of epidemics but cannot predict the occurrence of an outbreak in the absence of virus isolation from mosquitoes. They justify conducting an integrated vector control throughout the year. To cite this journal: Bull. Soc. Pathol. Exot. 104 (2011). © Socíté de pathologie exotique et Springer-Verlag France 2010.


Pathoumthong K.,Health Science University | Khampanisong P.,Health Science University | Quet F.,Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt | Quet F.,Limoges University Hospital Center | And 4 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2014

Health care workers (HCW) are a population at high risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, especially in endemic countries such as Lao PDR. Effective vaccines are available since over 10 years, but many HCWs are not aware of the risk of infection and are still not immunized against hepatitis B. This study aimed to assess immunization coverage against hepatitis B among the students of the University of Health Sciences (UHS) of Lao PDR in 2013 and to look for the causes of non-vaccination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted by self-administered questionnaire on a representative stratified sample of each academic year in each faculty. In total, 961 questionnaires were collected, Basic Sciences: 143, Medicine: 167, Pharmacy: 148, Dentistry: 139, Nursing Sciences: 159, Medical Technology: 99, and Postgraduate Studies: 106. Respondents were predominantly female (59.1%), mean age 25.1. ±. 7.0 years, single (76.3%), from the provinces (68.0%), of the Lao Loum ethnic group (84.4%). Among them, 21% were fully vaccinated against hepatitis B and 9.5% partially. Immunization coverage rates were significantly higher among women (p= 0.01), students aged over 25 years, married or belonging to the post-graduate faculty (p<. 0.001). The most common reason (38.6%) given for non-vaccination was not knowing where to get vaccinated. Knowledge about hepatitis B, scored from 0 to 5, was poor (0-1) for 86.5% of the students, but 77.5% were aware of the hepatitis B vaccine. The knowledge scores were significantly higher for students aged over 25 years, married or post-graduated (p<. 0.001). Vaccination coverage against hepatitis B is dramatically low among students of health professions in Laos, largely because of their lack of knowledge and awareness. Upon admission to the University, all future HCWs should receive information about the occupational risks of blood-borne viruses transmission and be encouraged to get vaccinated against hepatitis B. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Xaydalasouk K.,Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt | Keomalaphet S.,Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt | Latthaphasavang V.,Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt | Souvong V.,Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt | Buisson Y.,Institute Of La Francophonie Pour La Medecine Tropicale Ifmt
Bulletin de la Societe de Pathologie Exotique | Year: 2016

Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains highly endemic in Laos, mainly related to mother to child transmission. Despite the introduction of the vaccination against HBV in the Expanded Programme on Immunization in 2001 and the administration of a vaccine birth dose as part of a 3-dose schedule since 2004, infant immunization coverage remains inadequate because most mothers are not aware of the risks. A survey was conducted in early 2013 in Vientiane capital among women who undergo serologic screening for hepatitis B at the prenatal consultation, to assess their knowledge and risk factors of HBV infection. It included the administration of a standardized questionnaire divided into four parts (socio-demographic data, knowledge about hepatitis B, risk factors and immunization status) and a screening test for the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). A total of 200 pregnant women were recruited consecutively in Mahosot hospital. They were aged 14-39 years (mean 27 ± 4.76 years), civil servants (37%) or housewives (33.5%) with a secondary or higher education level (80%). Most were multiparous (68.5%) and attended antenatal care in the third trimester of pregnancy (61%). Sixteen (8%) tested HBsAg positive. The HBsAg seroprevalence was higher in the 26-30 years age group, among women above the primary school education level and women practicing the profession of shopkeeper or civil servant, but these differences were not significant. Hepatitis B was known by a small majority (53%) but 26% could name the routes of transmission, 28% considered it as a serious illness and 24.5% were aware of the HBV vaccine. No risk factor for blood or sexual exposure to HBVinfection was significantly linked to the HBsAg carriage. In this sample of pregnant women mostly urban, educated and multiparous with access to a central hospital, the high rate of HBV infection and the low level of knowledge about the risk of mother-to-child HBV transmission reveals a major gap in information and advice that should be provided during prenatal visits. A large scale program of health education focused on the prevention of vertical transmission of HBV should be implemented, parallel to the extension of HBV vaccine coverage including a birth dose for the Lao children. © 2016, Springer-Verlag France.

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