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Spichler A.,Institute of Infectology Emilio Ribas | Athanazio D.,Federal University of Bahia | Seguro A.C.,Institute of Infectology Emilio Ribas | Vinetz J.M.,University of California at San Diego
International Journal of Infectious Diseases | Year: 2011

Objective: The outcome of leptospirosis after the resolution of acute disease, either spontaneously or after treatment, is not well described. The aim of this study was to assess the possible sequelae of acute leptospirosis after hospital discharge. Methods: We report here a prospective study carried out in São Paulo, Brazil in which patients hospitalized for leptospirosis were followed in the outpatient setting. Results: Forty-seven patients were serially assessed: 32 severe and 15 mild cases. Early and late complications were not common in either group, but subjective complaints were common in the first few weeks after hospital discharge (53% of severe cases, 40% of mild cases). Two patients had continuing complaints: one had profound general malaise and the other developed new onset panic disorder. The sample analyzed represented 26% of the patients hospitalized with leptospirosis in the city of São Paulo during the study period. The duration of follow-up was an average of approximately 20 days at the first visit, and approximately 40 days at the second visit. Forty-seven patients came for one follow-up visit and 22 of the same patients had two follow-up visits. Conclusions: While two of 47 patients reported continuing symptoms after hospitalization for acute leptospirosis, no definitive, objective evidence of chronic sequelae due to this infection was proven. While preliminary, these observations point to the need for a prospective, rigorous and systematic study to definitively determine and characterize late complications and chronic disease after acute leptospirosis. © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases.


Pessoa R.,Institute of Tropical Medicine | Watanabe J.T.,Institute of Tropical Medicine | Nukui Y.,University of Sao Paulo | Pereira J.,University of Sao Paulo | And 4 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Background: Here, we report on the partial and full-length genomic (FLG) variability of HTLV-1 sequences from 90 well-characterized subjects, including 48 HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers (ACs), 35 HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and 7 adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) patients, using an Illumina paired-end protocol. Methods: Blood samples were collected from 90 individuals, and DNA was extracted from the PBMCs to measure the proviral load and to amplify the HTLV-1 FLG from two overlapping fragments. The amplified PCR products were subjected to deep sequencing. The sequencing data were assembled, aligned, and mapped against the HTLV-1 genome with sufficient genetic resemblance and utilized for further phylogenetic analysis. Results: A high-throughput sequencing-by-synthesis instrument was used to obtain an average of 3210- and 5200-fold coverage of the partial (n = 14) and FLG (n = 76) data from the HTLV-1 strains, respectively. The results based on the phylogenetic trees of consensus sequences from partial and FLGs revealed that 86 (95.5%) individuals were infected with the transcontinental sub-subtypes of the cosmopolitan subtype (aA) and that 4 individuals (4.5%) were infected with the Japanese sub-subtypes (aB). A comparison of the nucleotide and amino acids of the FLG between the three clinical settings yielded no correlation between the sequenced genotype and clinical outcomes. The evolutionary relationships among the HTLV sequences were inferred from nucleotide sequence, and the results are consistent with the hypothesis that there were multiple introductions of the transcontinental subtype in Brazil. Conclusions: This study has increased the number of subtype aA full-length genomes from 8 to 81 and HTLV-1 aB from 2 to 5 sequences. The overall data confirmed that the cosmopolitan transcontinental sub-subtypes were the most prevalent in the Brazilian population. It is hoped that this valuable genomic data will add to our current understanding of the evolutionary history of this medically important virus. © 2014 Pessôa et al.


de Moraes Vasconcelos D.,University of Sao Paulo | Beitler B.,University of Sao Paulo | Martinez G.A.,University of Sao Paulo | Pereira J.,University of Sao Paulo | And 5 more authors.
Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases | Year: 2014

Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD 1 - CD18 deficiency) is a rare disease characterized by disturbance of phagocyte function associated with less severe cellular and humoral dysfunction. The main features are bacterial and fungal infections predominantly in the skin and mucosal surfaces, impaired wound healing and delayed umbilical cord separation. The infections are indolent, necrotic and recurrent. In contrast to the striking difficulties in defense against bacterial and fungal microorganisms, LAD 1 patients do not exhibit susceptibility to viral infections and neoplasias. The severity of clinical manifestations is directly related to the degree of CD18 deficiency. Here, a 20. year-old female presenting a partial CD18 deficiency that developed a megakaryocytic (M7) acute myeloid leukemia is described for the first time. The clinical features of the patient included relapsing oral thrush due to Candida, cutaneous infections and upper and lower respiratory tract infections, followed by a locally severe necrotic genital herpetic lesion. The patient's clinical features improved for a period of approximately two years, followed by severe bacterial infections. At that time, the investigation showed a megakaryocytic acute myeloid leukemia, treated with MEC without clinical improvement. The highly aggressive evolution of the leukemia in this patient suggests that adhesion molecules could be involved in the protection against the spread of neoplastic cells. © 2014.


PubMed | Institute of Infectology Emilio Ribas and University of Sao Paulo
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Blood cells, molecules & diseases | Year: 2014

Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD 1 - CD18 deficiency) is a rare disease characterized by disturbance of phagocyte function associated with less severe cellular and humoral dysfunction. The main features are bacterial and fungal infections predominantly in the skin and mucosal surfaces, impaired wound healing and delayed umbilical cord separation. The infections are indolent, necrotic and recurrent. In contrast to the striking difficulties in defense against bacterial and fungal microorganisms, LAD 1 patients do not exhibit susceptibility to viral infections and neoplasias. The severity of clinical manifestations is directly related to the degree of CD18 deficiency. Here, a 20 year-old female presenting a partial CD18 deficiency that developed a megakaryocytic (M7) acute myeloid leukemia is described for the first time. The clinical features of the patient included relapsing oral thrush due to Candida, cutaneous infections and upper and lower respiratory tract infections, followed by a locally severe necrotic genital herpetic lesion. The patients clinical features improved for a period of approximately two years, followed by severe bacterial infections. At that time, the investigation showed a megakaryocytic acute myeloid leukemia, treated with MEC without clinical improvement. The highly aggressive evolution of the leukemia in this patient suggests that adhesion molecules could be involved in the protection against the spread of neoplastic cells.


Bessa T.A.F.,Zoonosis Control Center | Spichler A.,Institute of Infectology Emilio Ribas | Berardis Chapola E.G.,Zoonosis Control Center | Husch A.C.,Zoonosis Control Center | And 5 more authors.
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene | Year: 2010

The biodiversity of potential leptospiral reservoir hosts is lower in urban than in rural environments. Previous data indicate the potential for bats to act as carriers of Leptospira in regions such as the Amazon of South America and in Australia. Yet, little is known about the contribution of bats to leptospirosis in urban environments in South America.This study aimed to test the hypothesis that bats infected with Leptospira are sources of leptospirosis transmission to humans in São Paulo City, Brazil. Six of 343 bats caught in different districts within the city of Sao Paulo (182 insectivorous, 161 frugivorous or nectarivorous) were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for pathogenic Leptospira; no seropositive bats were found.That few renal carriers of Leptospira were found in the city of Sao Paulo suggests that bats are not important in the transmission of leptospirosis to humans in this, and possibly other urban settings. Copyright © 2010 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.


de Azevedo Bastos V.R.,Federal University of São Paulo | de Castro Lima Santos D.W.,Federal University of São Paulo | de Castro Lima Santos D.W.,Institute of Infectology Emilio Ribas | Padovan A.C.B.,Federal University of São Paulo | And 5 more authors.
Mycopathologia | Year: 2015

We report the first Brazilian case of pulmonary invasive aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus lentulus, a new opportunistic Aspergillus species included in the section fumigati that is usually resistant to amphotericin B and azoles. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

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