National Institute of Infectology

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

National Institute of Infectology

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Time filter

Source Type

Carvalho-Santos A.,Oswaldo Cruz Institute | Ribeiro-Alves M.,National Institute of Infectology | Cardoso-Weide L.C.,Federal University of Fluminense | Nunes J.,Federal University of Fluminense | And 6 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that affects over 382 million people worldwide. Type- 1 Diabetes (T1D) is classified as an autoimmune disease that results from pancreatic β-cell destruction and insulin deficiency. Type-2 Diabetes (T2D) is characterized principally by insulin resistance in target tissues followed by decreased insulin production due to β-cell failure. It is challenging to identify immunological markers such as inflammatory molecules that are triggered in response to changes during the pathogenesis of diabetes. APRIL is an important member of the TNF family and has been linked to chronic inflammatory processes of various diseases since its discovery in 1998. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate APRIL serum levels in T1D and T2D. For this, we used the ELISA assay to measure serum APRIL levels of 33 T1D and 30 T2D patients, and non-diabetic subjects as control group. Our data showed a decrease in serum APRIL levels in T1D patients when compared with healthy individuals. The same pattern was observed in the group of T2D patients when compared with the control. The decrease of serum APRIL levels in diabetic patients suggests that this cytokine has a role in T1D and T2D. Diabetes is already considered as an inflammatory condition with different cytokines being implicated in its physiopathology. Our data suggest that APRIL can be considered as a potential modulating cytokine in the inflammatory process of diabetes. Copyright: © 2015 Carvalho-Santos et al.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Saldanha J.F.,Federal University of Fluminense | Leal V.O.,Federal University of Fluminense | Rizzetto F.,Federal University of Rio de Janeiro | Grimmer G.H.,Federal University of Rio de Janeiro | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Renal Nutrition | Year: 2016

Introduction: Resveratrol is a phenolic compound that has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, resulting from enhanced antioxidant enzymes production and modulating nuclear factors involved in the inflammation-oxidative stress cycle, as . nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and . nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Objective: The study aim was to evaluate the effects of resveratrol supplementation on Nrf2 and NF-κB expression in nondialyzed chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Materials and Methods: A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial was performed in 20 nondialyzed CKD patients (62.0 ± 8.0 years old, 45% men, body mass index of 27.7 ± 1.2 kg/m2, estimated glomerular filtration rate of 34.0 ± 13.0 mL/minute). Eleven patients were randomly allocated to "placebo first" (4 weeks placebo; 8 weeks washout, 4 weeks 500 mg of resveratrol/day) and 9 to "resveratrol first" (4 weeks 500 mg of resveratrol/day, 8 weeks washout, 4 weeks placebo). The peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and processed for expression Nrf2 and NF-κB by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Proinflammatory cytokines and antioxidant enzymes were also measured. Results: The effect size of Nrf2 supplementation (-0.13, . P = .29) and NF-κB (0.09, . P = .31) was not significant. There was no difference in proinflammatory biomarkers or antioxidant biomarkers after resveratrol supplementation. Conclusion: In this pilot study, 500 mg of resveratrol supplementation for 4 weeks had no antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect in nondialyzed CKD patients. Additional studies with differing doses and/or time of treatment should be conducted to better elucidate the effects of the resveratrol supplementation in CKD patients. © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc.


Perce-da-Silva D.S.,Oswaldo Cruz Foundation | Silva L.A.,Oswaldo Cruz Foundation | Lima-Junior J.C.,Oswaldo Cruz Foundation | Cardoso-Oliveira J.,Federal University of Rio de Janeiro | And 5 more authors.
Tissue Antigens | Year: 2015

Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are expressed mainly in natural killer cells and specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules. The repertoire of KIR genes and KIR-HLA pairs is known to play a key role in the susceptibilities to and the outcomes of several diseases, including malaria. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of KIR genes, KIR genotypes and KIR-HLA pair combinations in a population naturally exposed to malaria from Brazilian Amazon. All 16 KIR genes investigated were present in the studied population. Overall, 46 KIR genotypes were defined. The two most common genotypes in the Porto Velho communities, genotypes 1 and 2, were present at similar frequencies as in the Americas. Principal component analysis based on the frequencies of the KIR genes placed the Porto Velho population closer to the Venezuela Mestizos, USA California hispanic and Brazil Paraná Mixed in terms of KIR gene frequencies. This analysis highlights the multi-ethnic profile of the Porto Velho population. Most of the individuals were found to have at least one inhibitory KIR-HLA pair. Seventy-five KIR-HLA pair combinations were identified. The KIR-2DL2/3_HLA-C1, KIR3DL1_HLA-Bw4 and KIR2DL1_HLA-C2 pairs were the most common. There was no association between KIR genes, KIR genotypes or KIR-HLA pair combinations and malaria susceptibility in the studied population. This is the first report on the distribution of KIR and known HLA ligands in the Porto Velho population. Taken together, these results should provide baseline information that will be relevant to population evolutionary history, malaria and other diseases studies in populations of the Brazilian Amazon. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


PubMed | Federal University of Fluminense, Institute of Molecular Genetics of Montpellier, National Institute of Infectology and Oswaldo Cruz Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that affects over 382 million people worldwide. Type-1 Diabetes (T1D) is classified as an autoimmune disease that results from pancreatic -cell destruction and insulin deficiency. Type-2 Diabetes (T2D) is characterized principally by insulin resistance in target tissues followed by decreased insulin production due to -cell failure. It is challenging to identify immunological markers such as inflammatory molecules that are triggered in response to changes during the pathogenesis of diabetes. APRIL is an important member of the TNF family and has been linked to chronic inflammatory processes of various diseases since its discovery in 1998. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate APRIL serum levels in T1D and T2D. For this, we used the ELISA assay to measure serum APRIL levels of 33 T1D and 30 T2D patients, and non-diabetic subjects as control group. Our data showed a decrease in serum APRIL levels in T1D patients when compared with healthy individuals. The same pattern was observed in the group of T2D patients when compared with the control. The decrease of serum APRIL levels in diabetic patients suggests that this cytokine has a role in T1D and T2D. Diabetes is already considered as an inflammatory condition with different cytokines being implicated in its physiopathology. Our data suggest that APRIL can be considered as a potential modulating cytokine in the inflammatory process of diabetes.

Loading National Institute of Infectology collaborators
Loading National Institute of Infectology collaborators