Time filter

Source Type

PubMed | Institute of Hypokinetic Biochemistry and Institute of Hypokinetic Physiology
Type: | Journal: Clinical physiology and functional imaging | Year: 2015

Head-down-tilt (HDT) sleeping with periodic fluid redistribution (PFR) assumes a significant importance by the possibility of regulating bone remodelling. We hypothesized that HDT sleeping with chronic PFR which expands fluid volume would contribute to and/or increase bone formation. Therefore, we studied the potential benefits of osteogenesis with HDT sleeping of chronic PFR during diminished muscular activity (hypokinesia; HK).Studies were conducted on 40 male healthy volunteers. They were divided into four groups: head-down-tilt sleeping control subjects (HDTSCS), head-down-tilt sleeping hypokinetic subjects (HDTSHS), active control subjects (ACS) and hypokinetic subjects (HKS). The iliac crest cancellous bone and trabecular bone volume and cortical thickness were measured during pre-experimental period of 390days and experimental period of 360days.Iliac crest cancellous bone and trabecular bone volume and cortical thickness were increased (P<005) in the HDTSHS group compared to the HKS group. Iliac crest cancellous bone volume, cortical thickness and trabecular bone volume were reduced (P<005) in the HKS group compared to their pre-experimental values and the level in the other groups. In the HDTSCS group, iliac crest cancellous bone volume, cortical thickness and trabecular bone volume were increased much less than in the HDTSHS group. Bone mineral density was not affected in the ACS group compared to their pre-experimental values.The current study shows the impact of chronic HDT sleeping with PFR on increases formation of bone demonstrating osteogenesis of bone during diminished muscular activity.


Federenko Y.F.,Institute of Hypokinetic Physiology | Merkov P.L.,Institute of Hypokinetic Physiology | Yaroshenko Y.N.,Institute of Hypokinetic Physiology | Denogratov S.K.,Institute of Hypokinetic Physiology | And 2 more authors.
Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology | Year: 2014

Objective: Fluid redistribution (FR) is an important cornerstone in treating diseases. Findings of FR with periodic head down tilt (PHDT) had sparked renewed interest in treating electrolyte disturbances. Therefore this study aimed to determine the potential benefits of potassium (K+) deposition with periodic FR by PHDT during diminished muscular activity (hypokinesia; HK). Methods: Studies were conducted on 40-male volunteers. They were equally divided into 4-groups: active control subjects (ACS), hypokinetic subjects (HKS), periodic fluid redistribution control subjects (PFRCS) and periodic fluid redistribution hypokinetic subjects (PFRHS). Results: Muscle K+ increased (p<0.05) and plasma K+ level and K+ losses decreased (p<0.05) in the PFRHS group compared to the HKS group. By contrast in the HKS group muscle K+ reduced (p<0.05) and plasma K+ level and K+ losses increased (p<0.05) compared to pre-experimental period levels and the values of the other groups. In the PFRCS group the muscle K+, plasma K+ concentration and K+ losses were affected much less than in the PFRHS group. Conclusion: The current study shows that periodic-applied fluid volume addition into the body's regional areas by PHDT increases muscle K+ content and decrease K+ losses suggesting potential benefits of K+ deposition during diminished muscular activity.


Federenko Y.F.,Institute of Hypokinetic Physiology | Charapakhin K.P.,Institute of Hypokinetic Physiology | Yaroshenko Y.N.,Institute of Hypokinetic Physiology | Denogratov S.K.,Institute of Hypokinetic Physiology
Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology | Year: 2015

Objective: Bone loss is an established reaction to diminished muscular activity (Hypokinesia; HK). It has been assumed that periodic fluid redistribution (PFR) could contribute to vascular volume. The fluid volume expansion would then increase tissue perfusion. We hypothesized that chronic PFR could contribute to or increase bone density during HK. Therefore we investigated the potential benefits of bone density with chronic PFR during HK. Methods: Studies were conducted on 40 male volunteers. They were equally divided into four groups: active control subjects (ACS), hypokinetic subjects (HKS), periodic fluid redistribution control subjects (PFRCS) and periodic fluid redistribution hypokinetic subjects (PFRHS). The density of lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4), ulna and radius, tarsal and metatarsal, tibia and fibula were measured during pre-experimental period of 390 days and experimental period of 360 days. Results: Density of lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4), ulna and radius, tarsal and metatarsal, tibia and fibula increased (p<0.05) in the PFRHS group compared to the HKS group. Density of lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4), ulna and radius, tarsal and metatarsal, tibia and fibula decreased (p<0.05) in the HKS group compared to their preexperimental levels and the values in the other groups. In the PFRCS group lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4), ulna and radius, tarsal and metatarsal, tibia and fibula density were improve much less than in the PFRHS group. Bone density was not affected in the ACS group compared to their pre-experimental levels. Conclusion: The current study shows that bone density increases with chronic PFR suggesting potential benefits of bone density with chronic PFR during diminished muscular activity. © 2014, Association of Physiologists and Pharmacologists of India. All rights reserved.

Loading Institute of Hypokinetic Physiology collaborators
Loading Institute of Hypokinetic Physiology collaborators