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Zorbas Y.G.,Institute of Hypokinetic Biochemistry | Kakuris K.K.,Institute of Hypokinetic Biochemistry | Federenko Y.F.,Institute of Hypokinetic Biochemistry | Deogenov V.A.,European Foundation of Environmental science
Nutrition | Year: 2010

Objective: The incompleteness of electrolyte utilization during hypokinesia and electrolyte supplementation is the defining factor of electrolyte metabolic changes, yet the effect of electrolyte supplementation and HK upon electrolyte utilization is poorly understood. To determine the influence of magnesium (Mg2+) supplementation and hypokinesia (diminished movement) on magnesium utilization, we investigated the use of Mg2+ supplementation to establish its effect upon muscle Mg2+ content and Mg22+ losses. Methods: This study was conducted in 40 physically healthy male volunteers during a pre-experimental period of 30 d and an experimental period of 364 d. Subjects were equally divided into four groups: unsupplemented control subjects (UCSs), unsupplemented experimental subjects (UESs), supplemented control subjects (SCSs), and supplemented experimental subjects (SESs). A daily supplementation of 3.0 mmol of magnesium-chloride per kilogram of body weight was given to subjects in the SCS and SES groups. Results: Muscle Mg2+ content decreased (P < 0.05) and plasma Mg2+ concentration and Mg2+ loss in urine and feces increased (P < 0.05) in the SES and UES groups compared with their pre-experimental levels and values in their respective control groups (SCS and UCS). Muscle Mg2+ content decreased more (P < 0.05) and plasma Mg2+ concentration and Mg2+ loss in urine and feces increased more (P < 0.05) in the SES group than in the UES group. The muscle Mg2+ content and plasma Mg2+ level and Mg2+ losses did not change in the control groups. Conclusion: Daily Mg2+ supplementation during prolonged hypokinesia decreases more muscle Mg2+ content and Mg2+-deficient muscle increases more Mg2+ loss in healthy subjects indicating lower Mg2+ utilization with than without Mg2+ supplementation. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. Source


Zorbas Y.G.,Institute of Hypokinetic Biochemistry | Deogenov V.A.,European Foundation of Environmental science | Kakuris K.K.,European Foundation of Environmental science | Federenko Y.F.,Institute of Hypokinetic Biochemistry
Trace Elements and Electrolytes | Year: 2011

Objective: Hypokinesia (HK) intensifies electrolyte losses in electrolyte deficient tissue, yet the mechanisms of electrolyte losses in electrolyte deficient tissue are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine muscle sodium (Na+) content and its effect on Na+ losses and the ability of the body to deposit Na+ during HK. Methods: Studies were conducted on 20 physically healthy male volunteers during a 30 day pre-experimental period and a 364 day experimental period. Subjects were equally divided into two groups: control subjects (CS) and experimental subjects (ES). The CS group ran average distances of 9.5 ± 1.2 km/day and the ES group walked average distances of 2.5 ± 0.4 km/day. Results: The muscle Na + content decreased and plasma Na+ level and Na + losses in urine and feces increased (p < 0.05) in the ES group compared with their pre-experimental levels and the values in their respective CS group. Muscle Na+ level and plasma Na+ level and urine and fecal Na+ loss did not show any changes in the CS group compared with their pre-experimental values. Conclusion: The conclusion was that muscle Na+ content decreases and Na+ losses increase in Na + deficient muscle due to the less efficient Na+ deposition attributable to many hypokinetic factors. ©2011 Dustri-Verlag Dr. K. Feistle. Source


Federenko Y.F.,Institute of Hypokinetic Biochemistry | Deogenov V.A.,European Foundation of Environmental science | Kakuris K.K.,European Foundation of Environmental science | Yerullis K.B.,Institute of Hypokinetic Biochemistry
Biological Trace Element Research | Year: 2011

Hypokinesia (HK) induces electrolyte losses in electrolyte-deficient tissue, yet the mechanisms of electrolyte losses in electrolyte-deficient tissue remain unknown. Mechanisms of electrolyte deposition could be involved. To determine the effect of prolonged HK on potassium (K +) deposition were measured muscle K + content and K + losses. Studies were conducted on 20 physically healthy male volunteers during 30 days pre-experimental period and 364 days experimental period. Subjects were equally divided into two groups: control subjects (CS) and experimental subjects (ES). The CS group was run average distances of 9.8±1.7 km day -1 and the ES group was walked average distances of 2.7±0.6 km day -1. Muscle K + content decreased (p<0.05) and plasma K + concentration, and K + losses in urine and feces increased (p<0.05) in the ES group compared to their pre-experimental level and the values in their respective CS group. Muscle K + content, plasma K + level, and urine and fecal K + losses did not show any changes in the CS group compared to their pre-experimental values. The conclusion was that K + losses in K +-deficient muscle of healthy subjects could have been attributable to the less efficient K + deposition inherently to prolonged HK. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source

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