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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

As a leading player in the provision of environmental system services as well as environmental remediation, BGE has been active in exploring Chinese and overseas markets in the past years. It has participated in a series of high-profile environmental programs, including a project of remediating pollution in Tengger Desert in northern China's Inner Mongolia, as well as a contamination control project in a mine in southeastern China's Fujian province, Ling told officials and business leaders at the forum. As an effort to expand international presence, BGE has worked on remediation projects in Kazakhstan, Indonesia, Mongolia, Laos and Myanmar. It has also established research centers with companies from Switzerland and Germany, as well as a joint company with TRS, an American remediation technology and equipment provider, Ling said. The forum, co-chaired by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is an important platform for growing cooperation in clean technology between China and the US, where industry counterparts of the two countries can discuss a variety of technical, trade and policy issues. Originally founded in 1992, BGE, whose predecessor was Lining Engineering Department of the Institute of High Energy Physics of Chinese Academy of Science, has been committed in environment technology researches and providing solutions to pollution prevention and control. BGE was listed on the A-share (603588.SH) at Shanghai Stock Exchange on December 29th. 2014. It has about 1400 employees with total assets of 4.4 billion Yuan. BGE's main businesses include environmental remediation, urban and industrial environments, such as the soil remediation, groundwater remediation, hazardous waste treatment, industrial solid waste treatment, industrial waste water treatment, sludge disposal as well as the power generation by waste incineration. It also provides project contracting, investment operations and technical services to government and business users. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/beijing-geoenviron-participates-in-china-us-environmental-industries-forum-300456071.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

NEW ORLEANS, May 11, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Environmental officials and business executives from China and the United States have called for closer technology cooperation in the face of rising environmental challenges to the world's two largest economies. At the Forth China-U.S. Environmental Industries Forum (EIF), Ling Jinming, executive director of Beijing GeoEnviron Engineering & Technology Inc. (BGE) said that company would like to take the opportunity to expand cooperation with U.S. counterparts for further industrial upgrades. As a leading player in the provision of environmental system services as well as environmental remediation, BGE has been active in exploring Chinese and overseas markets in the past years. It has participated in a series of high-profile environmental programs, including a project of remediating pollution in Tengger Desert in northern China's Inner Mongolia, as well as a contamination control project in a mine in southeastern China's Fujian province, Ling told officials and business leaders at the forum. As an effort to expand international presence, BGE has worked on remediation projects in Kazakhstan, Indonesia, Mongolia, Laos and Myanmar. It has also established research centers with companies from Switzerland and Germany, as well as a joint company with TRS, an American remediation technology and equipment provider, Ling said. The forum, co-chaired by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is an important platform for growing cooperation in clean technology between China and the US, where industry counterparts of the two countries can discuss a variety of technical, trade and policy issues. Originally founded in 1992, BGE, whose predecessor was Lining Engineering Department of the Institute of High Energy Physics of Chinese Academy of Science, has been committed in environment technology researches and providing solutions to pollution prevention and control. BGE was listed on the A-share (603588.SH) at Shanghai Stock Exchange on December 29th. 2014. It has about 1400 employees with total assets of 4.4 billion Yuan. BGE's main businesses include environmental remediation, urban and industrial environments, such as the soil remediation, groundwater remediation, hazardous waste treatment, industrial solid waste treatment, industrial waste water treatment, sludge disposal as well as the power generation by waste incineration. It also provides project contracting, investment operations and technical services to government and business users. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/beijing-geoenviron-participates-in-china-us-environmental-industries-forum-300456071.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The vertical barrier system, which could effectively control, separate and block contaminants from polluting underground water and soils in dredge mining operations, is one of the core technologies independently developed by BGE (XSHG: 603588), a leading player in the industry that provides advanced pollution prevention and treatment solutions in China. The technology, which is expected to become the most eco-friendly solution to the rising potential threats caused by leakage of toxic and harmful obstacles in abandoned mines as well as aging refuse landfills in the cities, has been honored the third prize of Science and Technology of Environmental Protection, and selected on the list of 2015 National Key Environmental Protection Practical Technology. So far, the vertical barrier technology has been successfully used in a series of projects in China, including Zijin Mining Project in Fujian province and Chihong Zn&Ge project in Yunnan province, which the vertical barrier wall was used to contain groundwater flow and migration of metal ion, as well as Jingjiang Project in Jiangsu province to contain groundwater flow and migration of organic chemicals. Originally founded in 1992, BGE, whose predecessor was Lining Engineering Department of the Institute of High Energy Physics of Chinese Academy of Science, has been committed in environment technology researches and providing solutions to pollution prevention and control. BGE was listed on the A-share (XSHG: 603588) at Shanghai Stock Exchange on December 29th. 2014. It has about 1400 employees with total assets of 4.4 billion Yuan. At present, BGE owns 138 patented technologies, 6 software copyrights. BGE has hosted or participated in the setting of 38 national and professional standards and technical specification. As a member of International Association of Geosynthetic Installers (IAGI) and International Geosynthetics Society (IGS) since 2006, BGE has been a pioneer in exploring the international market with completing projects in Kazakhstan, Indonesia, Mongolia, Laos and Myanmar. BGE has also set up an branch together with the Indonesian government to promote local industrial upgrading by BGE's advanced incineration technology. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/beijing-geoenvirons-key-technology-awarded-as-top-100-in-china-300455147.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

BEIJING, May 11, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- An advanced control system against mining contamination, independently developed by Beijing GeoEnviron Engineering & Technology Inc (BGE), has been listed as one of the 3iPET TOP 100 environmental protection technologies supported by Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection. The 3iPET Top 100 Environmental Protection Technologies Contests is launched by Foreign Economic Cooperation Office (FECO) of Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) of China. An efforts as China is exploring the best technologies and cooperation networks among official and private organizations and companies, both domestic and international, in the hope to provide the best opportunities to promote technologies to solve environmental problems in China and around the world. The vertical barrier system, which could effectively control, separate and block contaminants from polluting underground water and soils in dredge mining operations, is one of the core technologies independently developed by BGE (XSHG: 603588), a leading player in the industry that provides advanced pollution prevention and treatment solutions in China. The technology, which is expected to become the most eco-friendly solution to the rising potential threats caused by leakage of toxic and harmful obstacles in abandoned mines as well as aging refuse landfills in the cities, has been honored the third prize of Science and Technology of Environmental Protection, and selected on the list of 2015 National Key Environmental Protection Practical Technology. So far, the vertical barrier technology has been successfully used in a series of projects in China, including Zijin Mining Project in Fujian province and Chihong Zn&Ge project in Yunnan province, which the vertical barrier wall was used to contain groundwater flow and migration of metal ion, as well as Jingjiang Project in Jiangsu province to contain groundwater flow and migration of organic chemicals. Originally founded in 1992, BGE, whose predecessor was Lining Engineering Department of the Institute of High Energy Physics of Chinese Academy of Science, has been committed in environment technology researches and providing solutions to pollution prevention and control. BGE was listed on the A-share (XSHG: 603588) at Shanghai Stock Exchange on December 29th. 2014. It has about 1400 employees with total assets of 4.4 billion Yuan. At present, BGE owns 138 patented technologies, 6 software copyrights. BGE has hosted or participated in the setting of 38 national and professional standards and technical specification. As a member of International Association of Geosynthetic Installers (IAGI) and International Geosynthetics Society (IGS) since 2006, BGE has been a pioneer in exploring the international market with completing projects in Kazakhstan, Indonesia, Mongolia, Laos and Myanmar. BGE has also set up an branch together with the Indonesian government to promote local industrial upgrading by BGE's advanced incineration technology. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/beijing-geoenvirons-key-technology-awarded-as-top-100-in-china-300455147.html


BEIJING, May 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Beijing GeoEnviron Engineering & Technology(BGE)has stepped up efforts in international cooperation on urban mining and solid waste treatment as scientists and scholars are channeling their energies towards a waste-free world. In one of the latest efforts, BGE, a leading industry player in China, has co-organized an international symposium on urban mining, which was launched in Beijing's prestigious Tsinghua University on May 20. The symposium, one of the most important meetings hosted by International Waste Working Group (IWWG), aims to provide a platform for experts, scholars and industry players around the world to exchange views over the most advanced environmental protection technologies. The symposium, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University and University of Padova, a premier university in Italy, will be held in China and Italy alternately. Zhao Baojiang, the former vice-minister of Housing and Urban-Rural Development of China and the vice president of All-China Environment Federation, said at the opening ceremony that a deep cooperation between China and other countries around the world could make significant contribution on solid waste treatment. BGE's executive director Ling Jinming, who delivered the opening remarks on Saturday, later told xinhuanet that the symposium would offer an opportunity for environmental protection companies to broaden vision of the company. As a pioneer in the industry, BGE has a leading role in the various areas, such as urban mineral resources development, eco-industrial park construction, sustainable landfill, hazardous waste treatment and soil remediation, and the company has been active in exploring overseas opportunities for international development, said Ling, who is also the vice chairman of China Association of Urban Environmental Sanitation and director of Industrial Solid Waste & Hazardous Waste Treatment Committee. With professionals participating in the symposium, the industry is expecting more accelerators in industry upgrade and innovation in solid waste treatment areas, he added. Raffaello Cossu, the founder of IWWG, and Qi Changqing, the chief engineer at BGE, delivered a special report and joined a round-table discussion with Dario Sciunnach, from environment protection bureau of Lombardy in Italy and Professor Wang Hongtao, director of environmental engineering department of Tsinghua University. Zhao Hualin, State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission of the State Council, Yu Binyang, director of technology promotion center of Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development (MOHURD) and Yang Haiying, deputy director of Urban Construction Department of MOHURD, as well as nearly 200 Chinese and international experts, local officials and business representatives, attended the first symposium on Saturday. Originally founded in in 1992, BGE, whose predecessor was Lining Engineering Department of the Institute of High Energy Physics of Chinese Academy of Science, has been committed in environment technology researches and providing solutions to pollution prevention and control. BGE was listed on the A-share (603588.SH) at Shanghai Stock Exchange on December 29th. 2014. It has about 1400 employees with a total assets of 4.4 billion Yuan. BGE's main businesses include environmental remediation, urban and industrial environments, such as the soil remediation, groundwater remediation, hazardous waste treatment, industrial solid waste treatment, industrial waste water treatment, sludge disposal as well as the power generation by waste incineration. It also provides project contracting, investment operations and technical services to government and business users. BGE has been a pioneer in exploring the international market with completing projects in Kazakhstan, Indonesia, Mongolia, Laos and Myanmar.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: cerncourier.com

Ovsat Abdinov, member of the Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences (ANAS), died on 29 October at the age of 72, after a long illness. He was born in Belokan city, Azerbaijan, graduated from Baku State University in 1966, and defended his PhD thesis in 1972. It is impossible to overstate the impact that Abdinov had in the creation and development of high-energy physics in Azerbaijan. His wide knowledge, inexhaustible energy, talent in organisation and search for young specialists led to the creation of his own school in this field that serves as an example for future generations. Scientifically, Abdinov’s main interest was the theoretical description of hadron-nuclear interaction processes. He was the first to propose a hypothesis of the cluster formation in light nuclei, which was later experimentally proven. The laboratory he headed at ANAS Institute of Physics collaborated initially with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna and the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Serpukhov, both in Russia, followed by CERN. The creation and expansion of relations between Azerbaijan and CERN paved the way for the participation of Azerbaijan scientists in the LHC, but this did not interrupt connections with Dubna: Abdinov was a staff member of JINR, deputy of authorised representative of the government of Azerbaijan Republic in JINR, and a member of JINR Scientific Council. The creation of Azerbaijan’s first Worldwide LHC Computing Grid segment also owes its thanks to Abdinov. Abdinov was a famous scientific representative of the Azerbaijan intelligentsia. He was an organiser and invited speaker at international conferences, a presenter of high-level reports and the winner of numerous research grants both in the former Soviet Union and in Azerbaijan. He dedicated almost 20 years of his scientific activity to investigations carried out within the ATLAS collaboration. We hope that his work will be continued by his scientific heirs and further benefit Azerbaijan high-energy physics. Malcolm Derrick, a long-time leader in the Argonne high-energy physics (HEP) division, passed away on 31 October after a long illness. Born in Hull, UK, in 1933, Malcolm received his BSc and PhD degrees in physics from the University of Birmingham. After working on the cyclotron at Carnegie Tech, he moved to Oxford University in 1962 to help establish a bubble-chamber group working at CERN. In 1963 he moved to Argonne National Laboratory to work on the 12 GeV ZGS synchrotron then in construction. While working on several bubble-chamber experiments with the 30 inch chamber, Malcolm’s main interest was in establishing a programme of neutrino physics using the 12 foot bubble-chamber then being built. He was spokesman for the first experiment using the deuterium-filled chamber, which produced several important results including the first measurement of the axial-vector form factor in muon neutrino–neutron quasi-elastic scattering. This result was verified by later BNL and FNAL experiments. Malcolm served on two occasions as HEP division director and was always a source of good career advice. He enthusiastically supported the division's collaboration with the University of Minnesota to build an underground detector to search for proton decay in the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. This resulted in a rich programme of neutrino physics with a series of multi-kiloton detectors and in new underground laboratories at Soudan, using both atmospheric neutrinos and Fermilab neutrino beams. The important physics produced by the MINOS programme is the direct result of these early experiments. After the closure of the ZGS programme, Malcolm initiated Argonne participation in two important experiments: HRS at the PEP collider at SLAC, where he proposed using the superconducting magnet of the 12 foot bubble chamber as the solenoid for the HRS spectrometer, and the ZEUS experiment at the HERA collider in DESY. Malcolm took sabbatical leave at University College London and later at DESY, where he served as physics chairman and oversaw such activities as physics publications. A gifted speaker, he served on several review committees and was a HEPAP member and an active participant in the Snowmass Conferences. He retired in 2006. Besides being a brilliant physicist, Malcolm had a knack for entertaining his guests with stories about his life and endless anecdotes about history and philosophy. His spare time was spent reading good books, fine dining and listening to classical music. Malcolm leaves behind his wife Eva and his many children and grandchildren. He will be missed by all who knew and loved him. Russian physicist Valery Dmitrievich Khovanskiy passed away in Moscow on 7 September. A veteran of Russian experimental high-energy physics and long-time leader of the ITEP team in ATLAS, he will be remembered not only as an energetic contributor to the CERN neutrino and LHC programmes, but also as an honest and principled person who loved science and life. Valery was born in Sverdlovsk in the former USSR, and received his PhD (for the study of cumulative effects in πN-interactions) at the Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics (ITEP, Moscow) in 1969. Since then, his main scientific interests were in the fields of neutrino physics, novel particle-detection methods and hadron collider physics. In the first Russian accelerator neutrino experiment at the Serpukhov 70 GeV proton synchrotron (IHEP-ITEP, 1970–1978), Valery lead the detector construction and studied neutrino and antineutrino interactions to validate the then very young quark-parton model. In the late 1970s, Valery joined the CERN experimental neutrino programme at the SPS and PS, and became one of the senior scientists of the CHARM, PS-181, CHARM-2 and CHORUS experiments devoted to a systematic study of neutral currents, and the search for new particles and neutrino oscillations. From 1990 onwards, he participated in the ATLAS experiment. His group was active in the preparation of the Letter of Intent, working on the concept of radiation-resistant forward calorimeters, and, from 1995 to 2009, worked on the construction and commissioning of the ATLAS liquid-argon forward calorimeters, providing the major part of the tungsten electrodes. From 1995 to 2012, Valery was the leader of the neutrino-physics laboratory at ITEP. He served on the LHCC from 1992 to 1994 and for a long period on the Russian government’s commission on fundamental research. He was also one of the founders and lecturers of the famous ITEP Winter School of Physics. Valery had a vivid individuality and was invariably good humoured. His many pupils, colleagues and friends admired him and he will be very much missed. Edmund (Ted) Wilson, a well-known figure in the world of particle accelerators and former director of the CERN Accelerator School (CAS), died after a short illness on 3 November. The son of a schoolteacher in Liverpool, UK, he graduated in physics at the University of Oxford in 1959 and immediately joined the nearby Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. His first stay at CERN was in 1962–1963 and he returned in 1967 as a fellow, working in Werner Hardt’s group on the design of the booster for the new large synchrotron: the “300 GeV” machine, later to become the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). He became the right-hand man of John Adams in 1969, helping him to prepare the project for approval by CERN Council, which was given in 1971. He became one of the first staff members of the new “300 GeV laboratory” set up for the construction of the SPS. In 1973–1974, at the request of Adams, Ted spent a sabbatical year at Fermilab to work on the commissioning of the “main ring”, a machine very similar to the SPS. The lessons he learnt there would prove essential for the smooth commissioning of the SPS, for which he was responsible a few years later. Following the approval in 1978 of the bold proposal of Carlo Rubbia to turn the SPS into a part-time proton–antiproton collider, Ted started working on how to convert the machine from a synchrotron to a storage ring. He later worked on the design and construction of CERN’s antiproton complex: first the antiproton accumulator, to which a second ring, the antiproton collector, was later added. Ted was a natural and gifted teacher. During the days of SPS construction he ran a series of courses on accelerator theory for members of the 300 GeV laboratory, which evolved into the book An Introduction to Particle Accelerators. Following his appointment as CAS director in 1992, he was responsible for organising 25 schools, in addition to special schools in India, China and Japan. He also coauthored a fascinating book on the history of particle accelerators and their applications: Engines of Discovery, a Century of Particle Accelerators. On his retirement, Ted renewed his association with Oxford University by becoming a guest professor at the John Adams Institute of Accelerator Physics, where he taught and supervised students. He has helped to bring on a new generation of machine builders. Ted Wilson will be sorely missed by the world’s accelerator community. He will always be remembered for his impish smile and his dry sense of humour. He is survived by his wife Monika, his three children and five grandchildren.


China could soon rival Europe and the U.S. as a global leader in the field of particle physics. The world's most populous country now also aims to build the world's most powerful supercollider to have a better understanding of the Higgs boson, the so-called god-particle. China plans an investment of $6 billion to build the facility, which will be at least twice the size of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. The LHC is currently the world's largest and most powerful particle collider. The blueprint for the project dubbed the "Higgs Factory" was drafted in 2014 by researchers at China's Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP). The supercollider will be an underground facility that will smash subatomic particles at enormous speeds so as to generate millions of Higgs boson particles, which scientists believe is one of the fundamental blocks of the universe. The Higgs boson particle was discovered in 2012 by scientists who used CERN's LHC to smash high-energy proton beams at nearly the speed of light. Despite its enormous size and power, the LHC has limitations. IHEP director Wang Yifang said that the accelerator may not be capable of generating large quantities of the Higgs boson particles needed to support further studies. Wang said China's particle accelerator could offer a step closer to unraveling the mysteries of the universe as it will operate at about seven times the energy level of CERN's collider. Compared to the LHC, which lies in a tunnel 27 kilometers in circumference and 175 meters beneath the France-Switzerland border, the Chinese supercollider will lie in a massive underground ring measuring more than 50 kilometers in circumference. Qinhuangdao, a northern port city in China, is being considered for the location of the facility given its favorable geological conditions. Wang said China's version of LHC will be capable of producing large quantities of Higgs boson particles and this may help recreate the conditions following the Big Bang, which could shed light on the origins of universe and matter. The central government has yet to give approval to the plan, but scientists are optimistic that the research needed to construct the facility can begin as early as late 2016. Construction is anticipated to start by 2021. © 2016 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | August 24, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

It was a triumph for particle physics — and many were keen for a piece of the action. The discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 using the world’s largest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), prompted a pitch from Japanese scientists to host its successor. The machine would build on the LHC’s success by measuring the properties of the Higgs boson and other known, or soon-to-be-discovered, particles in exquisite detail. But the next steps for particle physics now seem less certain, as discussions at the International Conference on High Energy Physics (ICHEP) in Chicago on 8 August suggest. Much hinges on whether the LHC unearths phenomena that fall outside the standard model of particle physics — something that it has not yet done but on which physicists are still counting — and whether China’s plans to build an LHC successor move forward. When Japanese scientists proposed hosting the International Linear Collider (ILC), a group of international scientists had already drafted its design. The ILC would collide electrons and positrons along a 31-kilometre-long track, in contrast to the 27-kilometre-long LHC, which collides protons in a circular track that is based at Europe’s particle-physics laboratory, CERN (See 'World of colliders'). Because protons are composite particles made of quarks, collisions create a mess of debris. The ILC's particles, by contrast, are fundamental and so provide the cleaner collisions more suited to precision measurements, which could reveal deviations from expected behaviour that point to physics beyond the standard model. For physicists, the opportunity to carry out detailed study of the Higgs boson and the heaviest, ‘top’ quark, the second most recently discovered particle, is reason enough to build the facility. Japan’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) was expected to make a call on whether to host the project — which could begin experiments around 2030 — in 2016.  But the Japanese panel advising MEXT indicated last year that opportunities to study the Higgs boson and the top quark would not on their own justify building the ILC, and that it would wait until the end of the LHC's first maximum-energy run – scheduled for 2018 – before making a decision. That means the panel is not yet convinced by the argument that the ILC should be built irrespective of what the LHC finds, says Masanori Yamauchi, director-general of Japan’s High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Tsukuba who sat on an ICHEP panel at a session on future facilities. “That’s the statement hidden under their statement,” he says. If the LHC discovers new phenomena, these would be further fodder for ILC study — and would strengthen the case for building the high precision machine. US physicists have long backed building a linear collider. And a joint MEXT and US Department of Energy group is discussing ways to reduce the ILC’s costs, says Yamauchi, which are now estimated at US$10 billion. A reduction of around 15% is feasible — but Japan will need funding commitments from other countries before it formally agrees to host, he added. Snapping at Japan’s heels is a Chinese team. In the months after the Higgs discovery, a team of physicists led by Wang Yifang, director of the Institute of High Energy Physics in Beijing, floated a plan to host a collider in the 2030s, also partially funded by the international community and focused on precision measurements of the Higgs and other particles. Circular rather than linear, this 50–100-kilometre-long electron–positron smasher would not reach the energies of the ILC. But it would require the creation of a tunnel that could allow a proton–proton collider — similar to the LHC, but much bigger — to be built at a hugely reduced cost. Wang and his team this year secured around 35 million yuan (US$5 million) in funding from China’s Ministry of Science and Technology to continue research and development for the project, Wang told the ICHEP session. Last month, China’s National Development and Reform Commission turned down a further request from the team for 800 million yuan, but other funding routes remain open, Wang said, and the team now plans to focus on raising international interest in the project. By affirming worldwide interest in Higgs physics, the Chinese proposal bolsters Japan’s case for building the ILC, says Yamauchi. But if it goes ahead, it could drain international funding from the ILC and put its future on shakier ground. “It may have a negative impact,” he says. In the future, the option to use China's electron–positron collider as the basis for a giant proton–proton collider could interfere with CERN’s own plans for a 100-kilometre-circumference circular machine that would smash protons together at more than 7 times the energy of the LHC. Until the mid-2030s, CERN will be busy with an upgrade that will raise the intensity — but not the energy — of the LHC’s proton beam. And by that time, China might have a suitable tunnel that could make it harder to get backing for this ‘super-LHC’. At ICHEP, Fabiola Gianotti, CERN’s director-general, floated an interim idea: souping up the energy of the LHC beyond its current design by installing a new generation of superconducting magnets by around 2035. This would provide a relatively modest boost in energy — from 14 teraelectronvolts (TeV) to 28 TeV — that would have a strong science case if the LHC finds new physics at 14 TeV, said Gianotti. Its $5-billion price tag could be paid for out of CERN’s regular budget. For decades, successive facilities have found particles predicted by the standard model, and neither the LHC nor any of its proposed successors is guaranteed to find new physics. Questions asked at the ICHEP session revealed some soul-searching among attendees, including a plea to reassure young high-energy physicists about the future of the field and contemplation of whether money would be better spent on other approaches rather than ever-bigger accelerators. Indeed, the US is betting on neutrinos, fundamental particles that could reveal physics beyond the standard model, not colliders. The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois, hopes to become the world capital of neutrino physics by hosting the $1-billion Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility, which will beam neutrinos to a range of detectors starting in 2026. Funding will require approval from US Congress in 2017. But at the ICHEP session, Fermilab director Nigel Lockyer was confident: “We are beyond the point of no return. It is happening.”


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The jury of the International Bruno Pontecorvo prize announced on February 27 that the Bruno Pontecorvo Prize for 2016 is to be awarded to Prof. WANG Yifang from the Institute of High Energy Physics for his outstanding contribution to the study of neutrino oscillation phenomenon and to the measurement of the Theta13 mixing angle in the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino. WANG is the first Chinese scientist to win this award. This is another international prize for WANG after he was awarded the W. K. H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics in 2014, the Nikkei Asia Prize in 2015 and the Fundamental Physics Breakthrough Award in 2016. Prof. WANG was awarded the prize along with Prof. Kim Soo-Bong from Seoul National University in South Korea, and Prof. Koichiro Nishikawa from KEK in Japan, for their work on Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillations (RENO) and Tokai to Kamioka long baseline neutrino oscillation (T2K) experiments, respectively. The Bruno Pontecorvo Prize is a prize for elementary particle physics awarded by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. The prize was established in 1995 to commemorate Prof. Bruno Pontecorvo, the "father of neutrino physics". In accordance with Pontecorvo's chief area of research, the prize is awarded mainly for neutrino physics. WANG proposed the Daya Bay neutrino oscillation experiment in China, including the detailed detector design and experimental plan, to precisely measure the neutrino mixing angle theta13. He assembled a large international collaboration, and was elected co-spokesperson of the experiment. The prize list for the 2016 Bruno Pontecorvo Prize was approved by the JINR Scientific Council at its 121st session on February 24. An award ceremony will be held in September this year.


Zhou Z.,CAS Institute of Chemistry | Zhou Z.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Hollingsworth J.V.,CAS Institute of Chemistry | Hong S.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | And 2 more authors.
Langmuir | Year: 2014

Rheological measurements are utilized to examine the yielding behavior of a polystyrene (PS) core and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) shell microgel system with varying shell/core ratio. For a shell/core ratio of 0.15 at high concentrations, the suspensions show a typical hard sphere (HS) yielding response where the loss modulus (G″) exhibits a single peak due to cage breaking. As a result of tighter cages and less cage distortion prior to yielding, the peak location of G″ decreases with volume fraction. For a shell/core ratio of 1.10, which behaves like a soft jammed glass at high concentration, the suspensions exhibit a one-step yielding behavior similar to that of HS glass. However, the location of the peak in G″ increases with volume fraction, demonstrating the important role of particle deformation in the breakage of cages. For an intermediate shell/core ratio of 0.34, the system displays a two-step yielding behavior, as observed in previous reports for attractive glasses. By increasing the volume fraction, the strain of the first peak increases while the second one decreases. In addition, as the effective volume fraction increases to 112%, the two peaks merge into one broad peak. It is demonstrated that the first peak of G″ is due to deformation of the shell, and the second peak of G″ is attributed to cage breaking as a result of the cores colliding with each other. Combining these results, a yielding state diagram from typical HS to soft jammed glass is demonstrated. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

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