Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB

Delhi, India

Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB

Delhi, India
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Nathiga Nambi K.S.,C Abdul Hakeem College | Nathiga Nambi K.S.,Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB | Abdul Majeed S.,C Abdul Hakeem College | Taju G.,C Abdul Hakeem College | And 3 more authors.
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part - C: Toxicology and Pharmacology | Year: 2017

A novel cell line, Danio rerio gill (DrG), derived from the gill tissue of zebrafish, was established and characterized. The cells were able to grow at a wide range of temperatures from 25 °C to 32 °C in Leibovitz's L-15 medium. The DrG cell line consists of epithelial-like cells with a diameter of 18–22 μm. The cell line was characterized by mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. Acute toxicity tests were conducted on D. rerio by exposing them to nicotine for 96 h under static conditions. In vitro cytotoxicity of nicotine was assessed in DrG cell line using multiple endpoints such as 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), Neutral Red assay, Alamar Blue assay and Coomassie Blue protein assay. Linear correlations between each in vitro cytotoxicity assay and the in vivo mortality data were highly significant. Nicotine induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation in DrG cell line in a concentration dependent manner. DrG cell line and zebrafish exposed to nicotine significantly increased the elevation of lipid peroxidation (LPO) while depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidise(GPx1a) was observed. In nicotine treated fish and cells a negative correlation between reduced glutathione and LPO was observed. In addition, the production of ROS and the resulting oxidative stress resulted in increased expression of apoptosis related genes p53 and cas3.Collectively, our result suggests that nicotine has the potential to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, oxidative stress and apoptosis in DrG cell line and zebrafish. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Gupta A.C.,Jamia Millia Islamia University | Chaudhory A.K.,Gb Pant Hospital | Sukriti,Gb Pant Hospital | Pande C.,Gb Pant Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Hepatology International | Year: 2011

Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease globally and commonly associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome (MS). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a transcription factor abundantly expressed in adipocytes and plays a key role in the regulation of adipocyte differentiation, lipid and glucose homeostasis. Pro12Ala variant has been earlier associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes and MS. Aim: The present study aimed to determine the genotype frequencies of the Pro12Ala variant in NAFLD patients and any further association with other phenotype in the patients. Patients and methods: Ninety-eight NAFLD patients and 280 matched controls were genotyped for presence of the Pro12Ala variant. Genomic DNA was extracted and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism using Bst-UI was performed for the detection of C-G change at codon 12 position of PPAR γ2 gene. Genotype and allele frequencies were compared between patients and controls. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was tested by comparing expected/observed genotype frequencies by χ 2 test. Results: The frequencies of Pro/Ala genotype were comparable between NAFLD patients and controls. In the controls, 213 (75.7%) were homozygous for the wild-type (Pro/Pro) genotype and 67 (23.9%) were heterozygous (Pro/Ala). In NAFLD patients, genotypic distribution of wild type, heterozygous and homozygous were 63 (64.3%), 34 (34.7%) and 1 (1%), respectively. Heterozygous genotype was found to be significantly higher in the patients (P = 0.01). We also analyzed related phenotypic association of the patients with Pro12Ala genotype. We observed that the Pro12Ala (heterozygous) genotype was significantly higher in the patients who had body mass index >25 kg/m 2 (P = 0.025). Conclusions: Pro12Ala variation of the PPAR γ2 gene is associated with NAFLD and might play a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. © 2010 Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver.


Nasir S.A.,Hamdard University | Sharma A.,Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB | Khanam R.,Hamdard University | Vohora D.,Hamdard University
Neuroscience | Year: 2012

In the present study, the effect of medroxyprogesterone (MPA) is evaluated for its effect on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model of epileptogenesis in mice followed by evaluation on kindling-induced changes in cognitive and motor functions. To explore whether the effects are mediated via progesterone receptors, a selective antagonist of progesterone (mifepristone, MIF) was also taken. Kindling was induced by once every 2 days treatment with PTZ (25 mg/kg, i.p.) for 5 weeks. The seizure severity during induction of kindling and % incidence of animals kindled at the end of 5 weeks were recorded. The motor function was assessed using a grip strength meter, whereas spatial memory was assessed in a cross maze. MPA (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the seizure severity scores and produced a significant decrease in the incidence of animals kindled at the end of 5 weeks (P<0.01). A higher efficacy was observed against male mice as compared with females following MPA. MIF neither reduced nor delayed the development of PTZ-induced kindling in mice. Also, it couldn't reverse the antiepileptogenic effects of MPA. On grip strength test (GST) and spontaneous alternation behavior (SAB), a significant decline in GST and % alternation was observed in kindled mice which was reversed by pre-treatment with MPA. MIF, however, could reverse only the reduced % alternation and not grip strength (GS) in PTZ-kindled animals. The study shows that MPA has antiepileptogenic effects against development of PTZ-induced kindling in mice that may not be mediated via progesterone receptors. © 2012 IBRO.


Mahajan L.,Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB | Mahajan L.,National Institute of Immunology NII | Pandit H.,National Health Research Institute | Madan T.,Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB | And 14 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Surfactant protein D (SP-D), an innate immune molecule, has an indispensable role in host defense and regulation of inflammation. Immune related functions regulated by SP-D include agglutination of pathogens, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, antigen presentation, T lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine secretion, induction of apoptosis and clearance of apoptotic cells. The present study unravels a novel ability of SP-D to reduce the viability of leukemic cells (eosinophilic leukemic cell line, AML14.3D10; acute myeloid leukemia cell line, THP-1; acute lymphoid leukemia cell lines, Jurkat, Raji; and human breast epithelial cell line, MCF-7), and explains the underlying mechanisms. SP-D and a recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rhSP-D) induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, and dose and timedependent apoptosis in the AML14.3D10 eosinophilic leukemia cell line. Levels of various apoptotic markers viz. activated p53, cleaved caspase-9 and PARP, along with G2/M checkpoints (p21 and Tyr15 phosphorylation of cdc2) showed significant increase in these cells. We further attempted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of rhSP-D induced apoptosis using proteomic analysis. This approach identified large scale molecular changes initiated by SP-D in a human cell for the first time. Among others, the proteomics analysis highlighted a decreased expression of survival related proteins such as HMGA1, overexpression of proteins to protect the cells from oxidative burst, while a drastic decrease in mitochondrial antioxidant defense system. rhSP-D mediated enhanced oxidative burst in AML14.3D10 cells was confirmed, while antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, abrogated the rhSP-D induced apoptosis. The rhSP-D mediated reduced viability was specific to the cancer cell lines and viability of human PBMCs from healthy controls was not affected. The study suggests involvement of SP-D in host's immunosurveillance and therapeutic potential of rhSP-D in the eosinophilic leukemia and cancers of other origins. © 2013 Mahajan et al.


Motiani R.K.,University at Albany | Motiani R.K.,Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB | Stolwijk J.A.,University at Albany | Newton R.L.,University at Albany | And 2 more authors.
Channels | Year: 2013

Calcium (Ca2+) is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates a plethora of physiological functions. Deregulation of calcium homeostasis has been reported in a wide variety of pathological conditions including cardiovascular disorders, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. One of the most ubiquitous pathways involved in regulated Ca2+ influx into cells is the store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) pathway. In 2006, Orai1 was identified as the channel protein that mediates SOCE in immune cells. Orai1 has two mammalian homologs, Orai2 and Orai3. Although Orai1 has been the most widely studied Orai isoform, Orai3 has recently received significant attention. Under native conditions, Orai3 was demonstrated to be an important component of store-independent arachidonate-regulated Ca2+ (ARC) entry in HEK293 cells, and more recently of a store-independent leukotrieneC4- regulated Ca2+ (LRC) entry pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells. Recent studies have shown upregulation of Orai3 in estrogen receptor-expressing breast cancers and a critical role for Orai3 in breast cancer development in immune-compromised mice. Orai3 upregulation was also shown to contribute to vascular smooth muscle remodeling and neointimal hyperplasia caused by vascular injury. Furthermore, Orai3 has been shown to contribute to proliferation of effector T-lymphocytes under oxidative stress. In this review, we will discuss the role of Orai3 in reported pathophysiological conditions and will contribute ideas on the potential role of Orai3 in native Ca2+ signaling pathways and human disease. © 2013 Landes Bioscience.


PubMed | Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB, National Institute of Immunology NII, National Diagnostics, Brunel University and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

Surfactant protein D (SP-D), an innate immune molecule, has an indispensable role in host defense and regulation of inflammation. Immune related functions regulated by SP-D include agglutination of pathogens, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, antigen presentation, T lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine secretion, induction of apoptosis and clearance of apoptotic cells. The present study unravels a novel ability of SP-D to reduce the viability of leukemic cells (eosinophilic leukemic cell line, AML14.3D10; acute myeloid leukemia cell line, THP-1; acute lymphoid leukemia cell lines, Jurkat, Raji; and human breast epithelial cell line, MCF-7), and explains the underlying mechanisms. SP-D and a recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rhSP-D) induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, and dose and time-dependent apoptosis in the AML14.3D10 eosinophilic leukemia cell line. Levels of various apoptotic markers viz. activated p53, cleaved caspase-9 and PARP, along with G2/M checkpoints (p21 and Tyr15 phosphorylation of cdc2) showed significant increase in these cells. We further attempted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of rhSP-D induced apoptosis using proteomic analysis. This approach identified large scale molecular changes initiated by SP-D in a human cell for the first time. Among others, the proteomics analysis highlighted a decreased expression of survival related proteins such as HMGA1, overexpression of proteins to protect the cells from oxidative burst, while a drastic decrease in mitochondrial antioxidant defense system. rhSP-D mediated enhanced oxidative burst in AML14.3D10 cells was confirmed, while antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, abrogated the rhSP-D induced apoptosis. The rhSP-D mediated reduced viability was specific to the cancer cell lines and viability of human PBMCs from healthy controls was not affected. The study suggests involvement of SP-D in hosts immunosurveillance and therapeutic potential of rhSP-D in the eosinophilic leukemia and cancers of other origins.


Steinbicker A.U.,Harvard University | Steinbicker A.U.,University of Munster | Sachidanandan C.,Harvard University | Sachidanandan C.,Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB | And 16 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2011

Anemia of inflammation develops in settings of chronic inflammatory, infectious, or neoplastic disease. In this highly prevalent form of anemia, inflammatory cytokines, including IL-6, stimulate hepatic expression of hepcidin, which negatively regulates iron bioavailability by inactivating ferroportin. Hepcidin is transcriptionally regulated by IL-6 and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. We hypothesized that inhibiting BMP signaling can reduce hepcidin expression and ameliorate hypoferremia and anemia associated with inflammation. In human hepatoma cells, IL-6-induced hepcidin expression, an effect that was inhibited by treatment with a BMP type I receptor inhibitor, LDN-193189, or BMP ligand antagonists noggin and ALK3-Fc. In zebrafish, the induction of hepcidin expression by transgenic expression of IL-6 was also reduced by LDN-193189. In mice, treatment with IL-6 or turpentine increased hepcidin expression and reduced serum iron, effects that were inhibited by LDN-193189 or ALK3-Fc. Chronic turpentine treatment led to microcytic anemia, which was prevented by concurrent administration of LDN-193189 or attenuated when LDN-193189 was administered after anemia was established. Our studies support the concept that BMP and IL-6 act together to regulate iron homeostasis and suggest that inhibition of BMP signaling may be an effective strategy for the treatment of anemia of inflammation. © 2011 by The American Society of Hematology.


Mohanty D.,National Institute of Immunology | Sankaranarayanan R.,Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology | Gokhale R.S.,Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB | Gokhale R.S.,Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research
Tuberculosis | Year: 2011

The cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) possesses a repertoire of unusual lipids that are believed to play an important role in pathogenesis. In this review, we specifically focus on computational, biochemical and structural studies in lipid biosynthesis that have established functional role of polyketide synthases (PKSs) and fatty acyl-AMP ligases (FAALs). Mechanistic and structural studies with FAALs suggest that this group of proteins may have evolved from omnipresent fatty acyl-CoA ligases (FACLs). FAALs activate fatty acids as acyl-adenylates and transfer them on to the PKSs which then produce unusual acyl chains that are the components of mycobacterial lipids. FAALs are a newly discovered family of enzymes; whereas involvement of PKSs in lipid metabolism was not known prior to their discovery in Mtb. Since Mtb genome contains multiple homologs of FAALs and PKSs and owing to the conserved reaction mechanism and overlapping substrate specificity; there is tempting opportunity to develop 'systemic drugs' against these enzymes as anti-tuberculosis agents. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Jha P.,All India Institute of Medical Sciences | Jha P.,Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB | Pathak P.,All India Institute of Medical Sciences | Chosdol K.,All India Institute of Medical Sciences | And 6 more authors.
Experimental and Molecular Pathology | Year: 2011

Several single nucleotide polymorphisms of the TP53 gene have been reported, amongst which polymorphism in codon 72 (rs1042522) has received significant attention and shown to be associated with disease susceptibility in different cancer types. However, there are variable reports on this polymorphism in gliomas from worldwide with inconsistent results. In addition, the implications of other polymorphic loci are not much explored in gliomas. Hence, in the present study the TP53 sequence was analyzed for all polymorphism and mutations in a total of 84 gliomas of different types and grades from patients of Indian origin. The complete sequence of all coding exons (2 to 11) and introns 2, 3, 5 and 8 of TP53 gene were studied while for introns 1, 4, 6, 7, 9 and 10, only exon flanking regions could be studied. The polymorphic loci were compared with control population. In addition to the well known codon 72 polymorphism (rs1042522), three other polymorphisms rs1642785, rs1800370 and a 16 base pair insertion in intron-3 were found. At codon 72, our study showed higher Arg/Arg genotype in gliomas compared to normal population (38% versus 13%). The Arg allele frequency in glioma patients was comparatively higher than controls (0.55 versus 0.45; P = 0.037). The Arg allele frequency was also high in adult glioblastomas compared to paediatric counterparts (0.55 versus 0.36). However, there was no significant association of TP53 mutations with any genotype of codon 72. At rs1642785, the G allele frequency was significantly higher in gliomas than in control population (0.55 versus 0.36, P = 0.005). The genotype at a 16 base pair insertion in intron-3 was almost similar in case and control. However, the polymorphism at rs1800370 was exclusive to gliomas. This is the first report of TP53 gene polymorphism in glioma patients from India. Our study also delineates the frequency of four polymorphisms in gliomas for the first time. The codon 72 variant (rs1042522) and rs1642785 polymorphisms possibly poses risk to glioma development in Indian population. However, the functional significance of these polymorphism needs further elucidation. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Singla D.,Chandigarh Institute of Microbial Technology | Anurag M.,Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB | Dash D.,Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology IGIB | Raghava G.P.S.,Chandigarh Institute of Microbial Technology
BMC Pharmacology | Year: 2011

Background: The emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis poses a serious concern globally and researchers are in rigorous search for new drugs to fight against these dreadful bacteria. Recently, the bacterial GlmU protein, involved in peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide and techoic acid synthesis, has been identified as an important drug target. A unique C-terminal disordered tail, essential for survival and the absence of gene in host makes GlmU a suitable target for inhibitor design.Results: This study describes the models developed for predicting inhibitory activity (IC50) of chemical compounds against GlmU protein using QSAR and docking techniques. These models were trained on 84 diverse compounds (GlmU inhibitors) taken from PubChem BioAssay (AID 1376). These inhibitors were docked in the active site of the C-terminal domain of GlmU protein (2OI6) using the AutoDock. A QSAR model was developed using docking energies as descriptors and achieved maximum correlation of 0.35/0.12 (r/r2) between actual and predicted pIC50. Secondly, QSAR models were developed using molecular descriptors calculated using various software packages and achieved maximum correlation of 0.77/0.60 (r/r2). Finally, hybrid models were developed using various types of descriptors and achieved high correlation of 0.83/0.70 (r/r2) between predicted and actual pIC50. It was observed that some molecular descriptors used in this study had high correlation with pIC50. We screened chemical libraries using models developed in this study and predicted 40 potential GlmU inhibitors. These inhibitors could be used to develop drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.Conclusion: These results demonstrate that docking energies can be used as descriptors for developing QSAR models. The current work suggests that docking energies based descriptors could be used along with commonly used molecular descriptors for predicting inhibitory activity (IC50) of molecules against GlmU. Based on this study an open source platform, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/gdoq, has been developed for predicting inhibitors GlmU. © 2011 Singla et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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