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Zech M.,Klinikum rechts der IsarTechnical University MunchenMunich Germany | Castrop F.,Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik | Schormair B.,Klinikum rechts der IsarTechnical Universityt MunchenMunich Germany | Jochim A.,Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik | And 10 more authors.
Movement Disorders | Year: 2014

Recessive DYT16 dystonia associated with mutations in PRKRA has until now been reported only in seven Brazilian patients. The aim of this study was to elucidate the genetic cause underlying disease in a Polish family with autosomal-recessive, early-onset generalized dystonia and slight parkinsonism, and to explore further the role of PRKRA in a dystonia series of European ancestry. We employed whole-exome sequencing in two affected siblings of the Polish family and filtered for rare homozygous and compound heterozygous variants shared by both exomes. Validation of the identified variants as well as homozygosity screening and copy number variation analysis was carried out in the two affected individuals and their healthy siblings. PRKRA was analyzed in 339 German patients with various forms of dystonia and 376 population-based controls by direct sequencing or high-resolution melting. The previously described homozygous p.Pro222Leu mutation in PRKRA was found to segregate with the disease in the studied family, contained in a 1.2 Mb homozygous region identical by state with all Brazilian patients in chromosome 2q31.2. The clinical presentation with young-onset, progressive generalized dystonia and mild parkinsonism resembled the phenotype of the original DYT16 cases. PRKRA mutational screening in additional dystonia samples revealed three novel heterozygous changes (p.Thr34Ser, p.Asn102Ser, c.-14A>G), each in a single subject with focal/segmental dystonia. Our study provides the first independent replication of the DYT16 locus at 2q31.2 and strongly confirms the causal contribution of the PRKRA gene to DYT16. Our data suggest worldwide involvement of PRKRA in dystonia. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. Source

Schwab S.,Institute of Epidemiology II | Zierer A.,Institute of Epidemiology II | Schneider A.,Institute of Epidemiology II | Heier M.,Institute of Epidemiology II | And 7 more authors.
British Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2015

The aim of the present study was to examine the association between intake of five common antioxidative nutrients from supplements and medications (vitamin E, vitamin C, carotenoids, Se, and Zn) and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in the general population. For this purpose, a total of 2924 participants of the population-based Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg (KORA) F4 study (2006-8) were investigated cross-sectionally. Intake of dietary supplements and medication during the last 7 d was recorded in a personal interview, when participants were asked to show product packages of ingested preparations. Linear regression models were calculated; first, the exposure to regular nutrient intake was treated with a binary response (yes/no); then regularly ingested amounts were divided into quartiles to examine dose-response relationships. Effect of single v. combined supplementation of antioxidants was assessed through the inclusion of interaction terms into the models. Regular intake of any of the five investigated antioxidants per se was not associated with hs-CRP levels. However, dose-response analyses revealed that participants who regularly ingested more than 78 mg vitamin E/d, which corresponds to the upper quartile, had 22 % lower hs-CRP levels (95 % CI 0·63, 0·97) compared to those of persons who were not exposed to any vitamin E supplementation. Stratified analyses showed that this association was found only in persons who took vitamin E in combination with other antioxidants. The combined supplementation of vitamin E with other antioxidants could thus be a promising strategy for the prevention of inflammation-related diseases in the general population, if further studies could confirm that the proposed association is causal. © 2015 The Authors. Source

Teumer A.,University of Greifswald | Rawal R.,Institute of Epidemiology | Homuth G.,University of Greifswald | Ernst F.,University of Greifswald | And 16 more authors.
American Journal of Human Genetics | Year: 2011

Thyroid disorders such as goiters represent important diseases, especially in iodine-deficient areas. Sibling studies have demonstrated that genetic factors substantially contribute to the interindividual variation of thyroid volume. We performed a genome-wide association study of this phenotype by analyzing a discovery cohort consisting of 3620 participants of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). Four genetic loci were associated with thyroid volume on a genome-wide level of significance. Of these, two independent loci are located upstream of and within CAPZB, which encodes the β subunit of the barbed-end F-actin binding protein that modulates actin polymerization, a process crucial in the colloid engulfment during thyroglobulin mobilization in the thyroid. The third locus marks FGF7, which encodes fibroblast growth factor 7. Members of this protein family have been discussed as putative signal molecules involved in the regulation of thyroid development. The fourth locus represents a "gene desert" on chromosome 16q23, located directly downstream of the predicted coding sequence LOC440389, which, however, had already been removed from the NCBI database as a result of the standard genome annotation processing at the time that this study was initiated. Experimental proof of the formerly predicted mature mRNA, however, demonstrates that LOC440389 indeed represents a real gene. All four associations were replicated in an independent sample of 1290 participants of the KORA study. These results increase the knowledge about genetic factors and physiological mechanisms influencing thyroid volume. © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Source

Petersen A.-K.,Institute of Genetic Epidemiology | Zeilinger S.,Research Unit of Molecular Epidemiology | Kastenmuller G.,Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology | Werner R.-M.,Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology | And 20 more authors.
Human Molecular Genetics | Year: 2014

Previously,we reported strong influences of genetic variants on metabolic phenotypes, some of them with clinical relevance. Here, we hypothesize that DNA methylation may have an important and potentially independent effect on human metabolism. Totest this hypothesis,we conducted what is to the best of our knowledge the first epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) between DNA methylation and metabolic traits (metabotypes) in human blood. We assess 649 blood metabolic traits from 1814 participants of the Kooperative Gesundheitsforschung in der Region Augsburg (KORA) population study for association with methylation of 457 004 CpG sites, determined on the Infinium Human Methylation 450 Bead Chip platform. Using the EWAS approach, we identified two types of methylome-metabotype associations. One type is driven by an underlying genetic effect; the other type is independent of genetic variation and potentially driven by common environmental and life-style-dependent factors. We report eight CpG loci atgenome-wide significance that have a genetic variant as confounder (P = 3.9 × 10-20 to 2.0 × 10-108, r2 = 0.036 to 0.221).Seven loci display CpG site-specific associations to metabotypes ,but do not exhibit any underlying genetic signals (P = 9.2 × 10-14 to 2.7 × 10-27, r2 = 0.008 to 0.107). We further identify several groups of CpG loci that associate with a same metabotype, such as 4-vinylphenol sulfate and 4-androsten-3-beta,17-beta-diol disulfate. In these cases, the association between CpG-methylation and metabotype is likely the result of a common external environmental factor, including smoking. Our study shows that analysis of EWAS with large numbers of metabolic traits in large population cohorts are, in principle, feasible. Taken together, our data suggest that DNA methylation plays an important role in regulating human metabolism. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. Source

Pechlaner R.,Innsbruck Medical University | Willeit P.,Innsbruck Medical University | Willeit P.,University of Cambridge | Summerer M.,Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology | And 20 more authors.
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology | Year: 2015

Objective: The enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts cytoprotective effects in response to various cellular stressors. A variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in the HO-1 gene promoter region has previously been linked to cardiovascular disease. We examined this association prospectively in the general population.Approach and Results: Incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death was registered between 1995 and 2010 in 812 participants of the Bruneck Study aged 45 to 84 years (49.4% males). Carotid atherosclerosis progression was quantified by high-resolution ultrasound. HO-1 variable number tandem repeat length was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Subjects with 32 tandem repeats on both HO-1 alleles compared with the rest of the population (recessive trait) featured substantially increased cardiovascular disease risk (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 5.45 [2.39, 12.42]; P<0.0001), enhanced atherosclerosis progression (median difference in atherosclerosis score [interquartile range], 2.1 [0.8, 5.6] versus 0.0 [0.0, 2.2] mm; P=0.0012), and a trend toward higher levels of oxidized phospholipids on apolipoprotein B-100 (median oxidized phospholipids/apolipoprotein B level [interquartile range], 11364 [4160, 18330] versus 4844 [3174, 12284] relative light units; P=0.0554). Increased cardiovascular disease risk in those homozygous for 32 repeats was also detected in a pooled analysis of 7848 participants of the Bruneck, SAPHIR, and KORA prospective studies (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 3.26 [1.50, 7.33]; P=0.0043).Conclusions: This study found a strong association between the HO-1 variable number tandem repeat polymorphism and cardiovascular disease risk confined to subjects with a high number of repeats on both HO-1 alleles and provides evidence for accelerated atherogenesis and decreased antioxidant defense in this vascular high-risk group. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc. Source

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