Institute of Ecology INECOL

Xalapa de Enríquez, Mexico

Institute of Ecology INECOL

Xalapa de Enríquez, Mexico

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Olguin E.J.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Sanchez-Galvan G.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Melo F.J.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Hernandez V.J.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Gonzalez-Portela R.E.,Institute of Ecology INECOL
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2017

Pollution of urban water bodies requires stringent control measures and the development of low-cost and highly efficient alternative technologies. In contrast to Constructed Wetlands, Floating Treatment Wetlands (FTWs) have the advantage of not requiring large surface of land since they operate in situ. However, there is limited information about their long-term evaluation while operating at field scale. The aim of this work was to assess the performance of FTWs using a combination of Pontederia sagittata and Cyperus papyrus for the improvement of the water quality and provision of ecosystem services of a eutrophic urban pond. The FTWs were built with low-cost material easy to acquire and to ensemble. Two FTWs (17.5 m2 and 33 m2) located in Pond 1 within a complex of 4 urban artificial ponds were evaluated for two years. They promoted an increase in the dissolved oxygen (D.O.) within a range of 15 to 67%, a removal of fecal coliforms in the range of 9 to 86% and a nitrate removal in the range of 9 to 76%. The plant productivity reached a maximum of 363 gdm m− 2 d− 1 in the FTW1 and 536 gdm m− 2 d− 1 in the FTW2 during the period March–June 2016. The TKN and the TP content in the plant were in the range of 18.3 to 28.1 and of 0.05 to 0.196 g kg− 1 dry matter, respectively. In conclusion, the tested FTWs have proved to be a very beneficial low-cost technology for the improvement of water quality and provision of ecosystem services. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Olguin E.J.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Garcia-Lopez D.A.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Gonzalez-Portela R.E.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Sanchez-Galvan G.,Institute of Ecology INECOL
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2017

Phytofiltration lagoons are phytoremediation technologies suitable for tropical and sub-tropical regions requiring cost-effective and echo-friendly technologies. A biorefinery of fourth generation has been implemented at pilot plant level in Xalapa, Mexico, and the phytofiltration lagoon, being the first module for provision of treated water and plant biomass for biofuel production plays a key role. The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of such phytofiltration lagoon with a working volume of 13,000 L for the removal of nutrients from an urban river polluted with domestic wastewater and the biomass productivity of the macrophyte Pistia stratiotes, during five different experimental periods, comprising 42 days each one. The maximum absolute growth rates (AGR, gdw day− 1) registered for P. stratiotes during the Aug–Oct ‘15 and the March–Apr ‘16 and Apr–May ‘16 period were in the range of 13.51 ± 2.66 to 16.54 ± 2.02 gdw day− 1. The average biomass productivity was 5.808 gdw m− 2 day− 1. Productivities were similar during the periods of Aug–Oct ‘15, Mar–Apr ‘16 and Apr–May ‘16 and significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those registered in Oct–Nov ‘15 and Jan–Feb ‘16. Removal percentages of COD and nutrients varied according to the season. COD was in the range of 47.82 ± 39.3% to 88.00 ± 15.0%. Ammonium N was in the range of 76.78 ± 21% to 98.79 ± 0.9%. Nitrates were removed in the range of 16.92 ± 64%. to 97.14 ± 4.5%. Finally, phosphates were removed very effectively, from 73.72 ± 18.5% to 92.89 ± 4.3%. A hydraulic retention time of 7 days was enough for the effective treatment of the water from the polluted river. It was concluded that the phytofiltration lagoon with P. stratiotes is very feasible within the biorefinery for providing biomass year-round and for treating the polluted water very effectively. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Garcia-Alaniz N.,National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity CONABIO | Equihua M.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Perez-Maqueo O.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Equihua Benitez J.,National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity CONABIO | And 5 more authors.
Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability | Year: 2017

The UN sustainable development goals urge to achieve sustainable development in its economic, social and environmental dimensions. This international agenda advocates sustainable use of ecosystems and arresting and reversing land degradation and biodiversity loss. The lack of relevant, standardized and up-to-date data to monitor ecosystem change challenges to achieve this. Thus, an integrated, comprehensive resource-efficient approach is crucial to monitor ecosystems change. We introduce the recently initiated Mexican National Biodiversity and Ecosystem Degradation Monitoring System and examine three essential components to establish this national system. These components are: (i) a common scientific framework embracing the system's structure; (ii) a set of inter-institutional agreements and arrangements based on financial, technical and field capacities; and (iii) a cost-efficient working plan to ensure continuous national data gathering. The system will support data and information driven decision-making for national and international needs. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Vovides A.G.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Vovides A.G.,Environmental Microbiology Group | Bashan Y.,Environmental Microbiology Group | Bashan Y.,The Bashan Foundation | And 2 more authors.
Restoration Ecology | Year: 2011

Although several damaged mangrove ecosystems have been restored worldwide, so far, it has not been established whether a restored mangrove system regains all the functional properties of preserved mangroves. This study measured nitrogen fixation as an indicator of whether disturbed mangroves that were reforested or naturally regenerated fully recovered from this disturbance at a functional level. Rates of nitrogen fixation were measured for one year in impaired, preserved, reforested, and naturally regenerated mangroves dominated by the black mangrove (Avicennia germinans). There was no significant difference in rates of nitrogen fixation among preserved and adjacent reforested and naturally regenerated mangroves, but a significant reduction occurred in an impaired mangrove. Nitrogen fixation was mainly controlled by pH, salinity, and temperature. The highest rates of nitrogen fixation occurred in summer at pH values less than 6.4, whereas the impaired mangrove had higher pH and salinity and had very low nitrogen fixation activity. These results suggest that nitrogen fixation can be used as an ecological indicator of the success of reforestation and as a sensitive measure of perturbations in mangroves. © 2010 Society for Ecological Restoration International.


Olguin E.J.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Mendoza A.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Gonzalez-Portela R.E.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Novelo E.,National Autonomous University of Mexico
New Biotechnology | Year: 2013

The production of biodiesel utilizing microalgae has driven innovation worldwide, especially trying to overcome the current economic and technological limitations of the whole process. Within these efforts, the use of wastewater to cultivate oleaginous microalgae or the use of dual-purpose microalgae-bacteria-based systems that treat wastewater and produce oleaginous microalgae have become an attractive alternative. The aim of this work was to evaluate the population dynamics which occurred in mixed cultures of Neochloris oleoabundans with other native microalgae, in mixtures of a synthetic medium (BBM) and water of an urban polluted river. The effect of temperature, nutrient availability and the microscopic monitoring of the population dynamics in such mixed cultures were carried out. Furthermore, the isolation of the predominant consortium of diatoms and the evaluation of its kinetics of growth and its capacity for removal of pollutants was also performed. Results indicated that such green microalgae only predominated in mixtures containing 80% or 60% of the synthetic medium. In mixtures containing a volume of the polluted river higher than 40%, other microalgae predominated, especially diatoms of various genera. The diatom consortium isolated from a 100% of the river's water sampled in spring (April), was formed mainly by a population of Nitzchia frustulum and in less extent of Navicula sp. It showed a significantly higher specific growth rate when cultivated in water from the river, compared to cultures in synthetic modified diatom medium (MDM) and at 32°C, compared to cultures incubated at 25°C. The consortium was able to remove 95.45% and 95.78% of ammonia nitrogen, 60% and 62.5% of nitrates at 32°C and 25°C, respectively, after 2 days. It also removed 95% of phosphates at 32°C and 67% at 25°C after 4 days from the polluted river. Diatoms also showed significant accumulation of lipids after 10 days of cultivation when stained with Sudan III. In conclusion, such diatom consortium showed a large potential for being used in a dual-purpose system that could treat the water from polluted streams and that could produce lipid rich biomass. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Kress W.J.,Smithsonian Institution | Garcia-Robledo C.,Smithsonian Institution | Garcia-Robledo C.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Uriarte M.,Columbia University | Erickson D.L.,Smithsonian Institution
Trends in Ecology and Evolution | Year: 2015

The use of DNA barcodes, which are short gene sequences taken from a standardized portion of the genome and used to identify species, is entering a new phase of application as more and more investigations employ these genetic markers to address questions relating to the ecology and evolution of natural systems. The suite of DNA barcode markers now applied to specific taxonomic groups of organisms are proving invaluable for understanding species boundaries, community ecology, functional trait evolution, trophic interactions, and the conservation of biodiversity. The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology will greatly expand the versatility of DNA barcodes across the Tree of Life, habitats, and geographies as new methodologies are explored and developed. © 2014.


Olguin E.J.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Castillo O.S.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Mendoza A.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Tapia K.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | And 2 more authors.
New Biotechnology | Year: 2014

Dual purpose systems that treat wastewater and produce lipid rich microalgae biomass have been indicated as an option with great potential for production of biodiesel at a competitive cost. The aim of the present work was to develop a dual purpose system for the treatment of the anaerobic effluents from pig waste utilizing Neochloris oleoabundans and to evaluate its growth, lipid content and lipid profile of the harvested biomass and the removal of nutrients from the media. Cultures of N. oleoabundans were established in 4L flat plate photobioreactors using diluted effluents from two different types of anaerobic filters, one packed with ceramic material (D1) and another one packed with volcanic gravel (D2). Maximum biomass concentration in D1 was 0.63gL-1 which was significantly higher than the one found in D2 (0.55gL-1). Cultures were very efficient at nutrient removal: 98% for NNH4 + and 98% for PO4 3-. Regarding total lipid content, diluted eflluents from D2 promoted a biomass containing 27.4% (dry weight) and D1 a biomass containing 22.4% (dry weight). Maximum lipid productivity was also higher in D2 compared to D1 (6.27±0.62mgL-1d-1 vs. 5.12±0.12mgL-1d-1). Concerning the FAMEs profile in diluted effluents, the most abundant one was C18:1, followed by C18:2 and C16:0. The profile in D2 contained less C18:3 (linolenic acid) than the one in D1 (4.37% vs. 5.55%). In conclusion, this is the first report demonstrating that cultures of N. oleoabundans treating anaerobic effluents from pig waste are very efficient at nutrient removal and a biomass rich in lipids can be recovered. The maximum total lipid content and the most convenient FAMEs profile were obtained using effluents from a digester packed with volcanic gravel. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Olguin E.J.,Institute of Ecology INECOL | Sanchez-Galvan G.,Institute of Ecology INECOL
New Biotechnology | Year: 2012

Phytoremediation and phycoremediation are cost-effective and environmentally sound technologies for the treatment of polluted streams and wastewaters contaminated with metals. Currently, the most commonly used parameter to assess the metal uptake of biomass is (q) expressed as mg metal g dry weight-1. By contrast, the bioconcentration factor (BCF) is one of the most widely used factors to evaluate the metal uptake capacity of macrophytes. However, both parameters the metal uptake (q) and the BCF cannot be applied to differentiate between the ability of live plants or photosynthetic microorganisms to adsorb the metal onto their surface through passive mechanisms or to accumulate the contaminant at intracellular level through metabolically active mechanisms. This mini review has the objective of discussing the need to differentiate between bioadsorption and bioaccumulation of metals in live plants and photosynthetic microorganisms used in phytofiltration and phycoremediation processes, respectively. The use of two specific factors, the bioadsorption factor (BAF) and the intracellular accumulation factor (IAF) that have been previously reported in order to make a clear differentiation between these two metal removal mechanisms in Salvinia minima and Leptolyngbya crossbyana is highlighted. It is suggested that the BAF and the IAF can be used in phytofiltration wetlands and phycoremediation lagoons, where there is the need of specific information indicating the fate of the metal in order to gain information about possible removal mechanisms. These factors could also provide a tool to decide whether it is possible to harvest the biomass and to recover a fair amount of metal adsorbed onto the surface by means of desorbent agents. A critical assessment of the use of EDTA as desorbent agent is also included. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


The production of biodiesel utilizing microalgae has driven innovation worldwide, especially trying to overcome the current economic and technological limitations of the whole process. Within these efforts, the use of wastewater to cultivate oleaginous microalgae or the use of dual-purpose microalgae-bacteria-based systems that treat wastewater and produce oleaginous microalgae have become an attractive alternative. The aim of this work was to evaluate the population dynamics which occurred in mixed cultures of Neochloris oleoabundans with other native microalgae, in mixtures of a synthetic medium (BBM) and water of an urban polluted river. The effect of temperature, nutrient availability and the microscopic monitoring of the population dynamics in such mixed cultures were carried out. Furthermore, the isolation of the predominant consortium of diatoms and the evaluation of its kinetics of growth and its capacity for removal of pollutants was also performed. Results indicated that such green microalgae only predominated in mixtures containing 80% or 60% of the synthetic medium. In mixtures containing a volume of the polluted river higher than 40%, other microalgae predominated, especially diatoms of various genera. The diatom consortium isolated from a 100% of the rivers water sampled in spring (April), was formed mainly by a population of Nitzchia frustulum and in less extent of Navicula sp. It showed a significantly higher specific growth rate when cultivated in water from the river, compared to cultures in synthetic modified diatom medium (MDM) and at 32C, compared to cultures incubated at 25C. The consortium was able to remove 95.45% and 95.78% of ammonia nitrogen, 60% and 62.5% of nitrates at 32C and 25C, respectively, after 2 days. It also removed 95% of phosphates at 32C and 67% at 25C after 4 days from the polluted river. Diatoms also showed significant accumulation of lipids after 10 days of cultivation when stained with Sudan III. In conclusion, such diatom consortium showed a large potential for being used in a dual-purpose system that could treat the water from polluted streams and that could produce lipid rich biomass.


PubMed | Institute of Ecology INECOL
Type: Journal Article | Journal: New biotechnology | Year: 2012

Phytoremediation and phycoremediation are cost-effective and environmentally sound technologies for the treatment of polluted streams and wastewaters contaminated with metals. Currently, the most commonly used parameter to assess the metal uptake of biomass is (q) expressed as mg metal g dry weight(-1). By contrast, the bioconcentration factor (BCF) is one of the most widely used factors to evaluate the metal uptake capacity of macrophytes. However, both parameters the metal uptake (q) and the BCF cannot be applied to differentiate between the ability of live plants or photosynthetic microorganisms to adsorb the metal onto their surface through passive mechanisms or to accumulate the contaminant at intracellular level through metabolically active mechanisms. This mini review has the objective of discussing the need to differentiate between bioadsorption and bioaccumulation of metals in live plants and photosynthetic microorganisms used in phytofiltration and phycoremediation processes, respectively. The use of two specific factors, the bioadsorption factor (BAF) and the intracellular accumulation factor (IAF) that have been previously reported in order to make a clear differentiation between these two metal removal mechanisms in Salvinia minima and Leptolyngbya crossbyana is highlighted. It is suggested that the BAF and the IAF can be used in phytofiltration wetlands and phycoremediation lagoons, where there is the need of specific information indicating the fate of the metal in order to gain information about possible removal mechanisms. These factors could also provide a tool to decide whether it is possible to harvest the biomass and to recover a fair amount of metal adsorbed onto the surface by means of desorbent agents. A critical assessment of the use of EDTA as desorbent agent is also included.

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