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Julia-Sape M.,CIBER ISCIII | Julia-Sape M.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Majos C.,CIBER ISCIII | Majos C.,Hospital Universitari Of Bellvitge | And 16 more authors.
NMR in Biomedicine | Year: 2014

In a previous study, we have shown the added value of 1H MRS for the neuroradiological characterisation of adult human brain tumours. In that study, several methods of MRS analysis were used, and a software program, the International Network for Pattern Recognition of Tumours Using Magnetic Resonance Decision Support System 1.0 (INTERPRET DSS 1.0), with a short-TE classifier, provided the best results. Since then, the DSS evolved into a version 2.0 that contains an additional long-TE classifier. This study has two objectives. First, to determine whether clinicians with no experience of spectroscopy are comparable with spectroscopists in the use of the system, when only minimum training in the use of the system was given. Second, to assess whether or not a version with another TE is better than the initial version. We undertook a second study with the same cases and nine evaluators to assess whether the diagnostic accuracy of DSS 2.0 was comparable with the values obtained with DSS 1.0. In the second study, the analysis protocol was flexible in comparison with the first one to mimic a clinical environment. In the present study, on average, each case required 5.4min by neuroradiologists and 9min by spectroscopists for evaluation. Most classes and superclasses of tumours gave the same results as with DSS 1.0, except for astrocytomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grade III, in which performance measured as the area under the curve (AUC) decreased: AUC=0.87 (0.72-1.02) with DSS 1.0 and AUC=0.62 (0.55-0.70) with DSS 2.0. When analysing the performance of radiologists and spectroscopists with respect to DSS 1.0, the results were the same for most classes. Having data with two TEs instead of one did not affect the results of the evaluation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Narvaez J.,Hospital Universitario Of Bellvitge Idibell | Narvaez J.A.,Hospital Universitario Of Bellvitge Idibell | Serrallonga M.,Institute Of Diagnostic Per La Imatge Idi | De Lama E.,Hospital Universitario Of Bellvitge Idibell | And 3 more authors.
Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism | Year: 2015

Objective: To investigate the frequency, location, characteristics, and clinical significance of subaxial involvement (below C1-C2) in a series of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and symptomatic involvement of the cervical spine. Methods: A total of 41 patients with RA were examined via cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A comparative analysis of the incidence of the different types of subaxial lesions was performed between these patients and 41 age- and sex-matched patients with symptomatic cervical spondylosis. Results: Stenosis of the spinal canal was found at the subaxial level in 85% of RA patients, and at the atlantoaxial level in 44%. Comparative analysis between these patients and the cervical spondylosis patients revealed significant differences in the types and frequencies of subaxial lesions. For both conditions, signs of discopathy and end-plate osteophytosis were the most common abnormalities observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, in the RA patients these abnormalities coincided with subchondral bone and ligamentous acute inflammatory changes and with secondary destruction (vertebral instability) or repair (vertebral ankyloses).Only evidence of subaxial myelopathy was significantly associated with an increased risk of neurological dysfunction among the RA patients [Ranawat class II or III; P = 0.01; odds ratio (OR) = 11.43], although subaxial cord compression tended toward a significant association with the risk of neurological dysfunction (P = 0.06; OR = 3.95). Conclusion: Subaxial stenosis seems to be the consequence of both the inflammatory process and mechanical-degenerative changes. Despite its frequency, it was not usually related to the occurrence of myelopathy symptoms, not even in cases with MRI evidence of spinal cord compression. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Institute Of Diagnostic Per La Imatge Idi and Hospital Universitario Of Bellvitge Idibell
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism | Year: 2015

To investigate the frequency, location, characteristics, and clinical significance of subaxial involvement (below C1-C2) in a series of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and symptomatic involvement of the cervical spine.A total of 41 patients with RA were examined via cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A comparative analysis of the incidence of the different types of subaxial lesions was performed between these patients and 41 age- and sex-matched patients with symptomatic cervical spondylosis.Stenosis of the spinal canal was found at the subaxial level in 85% of RA patients, and at the atlantoaxial level in 44%. Comparative analysis between these patients and the cervical spondylosis patients revealed significant differences in the types and frequencies of subaxial lesions. For both conditions, signs of discopathy and end-plate osteophytosis were the most common abnormalities observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, in the RA patients these abnormalities coincided with subchondral bone and ligamentous acute inflammatory changes and with secondary destruction (vertebral instability) or repair (vertebral ankyloses). Only evidence of subaxial myelopathy was significantly associated with an increased risk of neurological dysfunction among the RA patients [Ranawat class II or III; P = 0.01; odds ratio (OR) = 11.43], although subaxial cord compression tended toward a significant association with the risk of neurological dysfunction (P = 0.06; OR = 3.95).Subaxial stenosis seems to be the consequence of both the inflammatory process and mechanical-degenerative changes. Despite its frequency, it was not usually related to the occurrence of myelopathy symptoms, not even in cases with MRI evidence of spinal cord compression.

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