Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology Nicolae Simionescu ICBP

Bucharest, Romania

Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology Nicolae Simionescu ICBP

Bucharest, Romania
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Grumezescu A.M.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest | Holban A.M.,University of Bucharest | Andronescu E.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest | Mogosanu G.D.,University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova | And 6 more authors.
International Journal of Pharmaceutics | Year: 2014

The aims of this study were the development, characterization and bioevaluation of a novel biocompatible, resorbable and bio-active wound dressing prototype, based on anionic polymers (sodium alginate - AlgNa, carboximethylcellulose - CMC) and magnetic nanoparticles loaded with usnic acid (Fe3O4@UA). The antimicrobial activity was tested against Staphylococcus aureus grown in biofilms. The biocompatibility testing model included an endothelial cell line from human umbilical vein and human foetal progenitor cells derived from the amniotic fluid, that express a wide spectrum of surface molecules involved in different vascular functions and inflammatory response, and may be used as skin regenerative support. The obtained results demonstrated that CMC/Fe3O4@UA and AlgNa/Fe 3O4@UA are exhibiting structural and functional properties that recommend them for further applications in the biomedical field. They could be used alone or coated with different bio-active compounds, such as Fe3O4@UA, for the development of novel, multifunctional porous materials used in tissues regeneration, as antimicrobial substances releasing devices, providing also a mechanical support for the eukaryotic cells adhesion, and exhibiting the advantage of low cytotoxicity on human progenitor cells. The great antimicrobial properties exhibited by the newly synthesized nano-bioactive coatings are recommending them as successful candidates for improving the implanted devices surfaces used in regenerative medicine. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Anghel A.G.,Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy | Anghel A.G.,Doctor Anghel Medical Center | Grumezescu A.M.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest | Chirea M.,University of Vigo | And 9 more authors.
Molecules | Year: 2014

Cinnamomum verum-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles of 9.4 nm in size were laser transferred by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique onto gastrostomy tubes (G- Tubes) for antibacterial activity evaluation toward Gram positive and Gram negative microbial colonization. X-ray diffraction analysis of the nanoparticle powder showed a polycrystalline magnetite structure, whereas infrared mapping confirmed the integrity of C. verum (CV) functional groups after the laser transfer. The specific topography of the deposited films involved a uniform thin coating together with several aggregates of bio-functionalized magnetite particles covering the G- Tubes. Cytotoxicity assays showed an increase of the G- Tube surface biocompatibility after Fe3O4@CV treatment, allowing a normal development of endothelial cells up to five days of incubation. Microbiological assays on nanoparticle-modified G- Tube surfaces have proved an improvement of anti- Adherent properties, significantly reducing both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria colonization.


Holban A.M.,University of Bucharest | Grumezescu V.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest | Grumezescu V.,Romanian National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics | Grumezescu A.M.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest | And 5 more authors.
Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology | Year: 2014

We report on the fabrication of thin coatings based on polylactic acid-chitosan-magnetite-eugenol (PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG) nanospheres by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation proved that the homogenous Fe3O4@EUG nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 7 nm, while the PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG nanospheres diameter sizes range between 20 and 80 nm. These MAPLE-deposited coatings acted as bioactive nanosystems and exhibited a great antimicrobial effect by impairing the adherence and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteria strains. Moreover, the obtained nano-coatings showed a good biocompatibility and facilitated the normal development of human endothelial cells. These nanosystems may be used as efficient alternatives in treating and preventing bacterial infections. © 2014 Holban et al.


PubMed | Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology Nicolae Simionescu ICBP, Science Metav CD S.A., Romanian National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, University of Bucharest and Polytechnic University of Bucharest
Type: | Journal: Beilstein journal of nanotechnology | Year: 2014

We report on the fabrication of thin coatings based on polylactic acid-chitosan-magnetite-eugenol (PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG) nanospheres by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation proved that the homogenous Fe3O4@EUG nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 7 nm, while the PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG nanospheres diameter sizes range between 20 and 80 nm. These MAPLE-deposited coatings acted as bioactive nanosystems and exhibited a great antimicrobial effect by impairing the adherence and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteria strains. Moreover, the obtained nano-coatings showed a good biocompatibility and facilitated the normal development of human endothelial cells. These nanosystems may be used as efficient alternatives in treating and preventing bacterial infections.


Holban A.M.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest | Holban A.M.,University of Bucharest | Holban A.M.,Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology Nicolae Simionescu ICBP | Iordanskii A.,RAS Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics | And 11 more authors.
Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology | Year: 2015

This review highlights and discusses the impact of nanotechnology on the inhibition of microbial colonization and biofilm development on modified surface prosthetic devices. In the first part of the paper the current status of infections related to prosthetic devices and the inquiries resulting from the increased number of patients with these infections are briefly reviewed. Next we discuss several aspects about the implication of nanotechnology in prosthetic devices surface modification and its impact on the prevention of infections. The main aspects regarding the biocompatibility and the application of these nanomodified prosthetic devices in tissue engineering are also highlighted. © 2015 Bentham Science Publishers


PubMed | Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology Nicolae Simionescu ICBP, University of Vigo, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Romanian National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics and Polytechnic University of Bucharest
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecules (Basel, Switzerland) | Year: 2014

Cinnamomum verum-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles of 9.4 nm in size were laser transferred by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique onto gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes) for antibacterial activity evaluation toward Gram positive and Gram negative microbial colonization. X-ray diffraction analysis of the nanoparticle powder showed a polycrystalline magnetite structure, whereas infrared mapping confirmed the integrity of C. verum (CV) functional groups after the laser transfer. The specific topography of the deposited films involved a uniform thin coating together with several aggregates of bio-functionalized magnetite particles covering the G-tubes. Cytotoxicity assays showed an increase of the G-tube surface biocompatibility after Fe3O4@CV treatment, allowing a normal development of endothelial cells up to five days of incubation. Microbiological assays on nanoparticle-modified G-tube surfaces have proved an improvement of anti-adherent properties, significantly reducing both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria colonization.

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