Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology

Fontenay-aux-Roses, France

Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology

Fontenay-aux-Roses, France
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Lehraiki A.,Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology | Lehraiki A.,University Paris Diderot | Lehraiki A.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Chamaillard C.,Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology | And 9 more authors.
Toxicology in Vitro | Year: 2011

The widespread consumption of soy-based products raises the issue of the reproductive toxicity of phytoestrogens. Indeed, it is well known that genistein, an isoflavone found in soybeans and soy products, mimics the actions of estrogens and that the fetal testis is responsive to estrogens. Therefore we investigated whether genistein could have deleterious effects on fetal testis. Using organ cultures of fetal testes from wild type and ERα or ERβ knock-out mice we show that genistein inhibits testosterone secretion by fetal Leydig cells during early fetal development (E12.5), within the masculinization programming window This effect occurs through an ERα-dependent mechanism and starting at 10. nM genistein, a concentration which is compatible with human consumption. No effect of genistein on the number of gonocytes was detected at any of the studied developmental stages. These results suggest that fetal exposure to phytoestrogens can affect the development and function of the male reproductive system. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Lehraiki A.,Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology | Lehraiki A.,University Paris Diderot | Lehraiki A.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Messiaen S.,Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology | And 11 more authors.
Reproductive Toxicology | Year: 2011

Continuous, low-dose exposure to a phytoestrogen (1 mg/kg/day genistein) and/or to an antiandrogenic food contaminant (1 mg/kg/day vinclozolin) has been recently reported to affect male reproductive tract and fertility [1] in adults. We investigated whether alterations of the testis are already present at the end of in utero exposure using the same rat model and doses following exposure from conception to delivery. After vinclozolin exposure, we observed in the neonate a slight but significant alteration of steroidogenesis and gametogenesis with a reduction of testosterone secretion and of the number of gonocytes. In contrast, genistein exposure had no effect. While the vinclozolin-genistein mixture acts in a synergistic manner to induce the most significant alterations in the adult, interestingly, genistein antagonized the deleterious effect of vinclozolin on germ cells in the neonate. This difference emphasizes the importance of studying the effects of endocrine disruptors during various developmental stages to understand their effects. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Reproductive toxicology (Elmsford, N.Y.) | Year: 2011

Continuous, low-dose exposure to a phytoestrogen (1 mg/kg/day genistein) and/or to an antiandrogenic food contaminant (1 mg/kg/day vinclozolin) has been recently reported to affect male reproductive tract and fertility [1] in adults. We investigated whether alterations of the testis are already present at the end of in utero exposure using the same rat model and doses following exposure from conception to delivery. After vinclozolin exposure, we observed in the neonate a slight but significant alteration of steroidogenesis and gametogenesis with a reduction of testosterone secretion and of the number of gonocytes. In contrast, genistein exposure had no effect. While the vinclozolin-genistein mixture acts in a synergistic manner to induce the most significant alterations in the adult, interestingly, genistein antagonized the deleterious effect of vinclozolin on germ cells in the neonate. This difference emphasizes the importance of studying the effects of endocrine disruptors during various developmental stages to understand their effects.

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