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Kravtsova A.V.,Joint Institute for Nuclear Research | Milchakova N.A.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Frontasyeva M.V.,Joint Institute for Nuclear Research
Marine Pollution Bulletin | Year: 2015

Levels of Al, Sc, V, Co, Ni, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Ag, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, Th and U that were rarely or never studied, as well as the concentrations of classically investigated Mn, Fe and Zn in brown algae Cystoseira barbata C. Ag. and Cystoseira crinita (Desf.) Bory from the coastal waters of marine protected areas (Crimea, Black Sea), were determined using neutron activation analysis. Spatial variation and compartmentalization were studied for all 19 trace elements (TE). Concentrations of most TE were higher in "branches" than in "stems". Spatial variations of V, Co, Ni and Zn can be related to anthropogenic activities while Al, Sc, Fe, Rb, Cs, Th and U varied depending on chemical peculiarities of the coastal zone rocks. TE concentrations in C. crinita from marine protected areas near Tarkhankut peninsula and Cape Fiolent, identified as the most clean water areas, are submitted as the background concentrations. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas and Joint Institute for Nuclear Research
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Marine pollution bulletin | Year: 2015

Levels of Al, Sc, V, Co, Ni, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Ag, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, Th and U that were rarely or never studied, as well as the concentrations of classically investigated Mn, Fe and Zn in brown algae Cystoseira barbata C. Ag. and Cystoseira crinita (Desf.) Bory from the coastal waters of marine protected areas (Crimea, Black Sea), were determined using neutron activation analysis. Spatial variation and compartmentalization were studied for all 19 trace elements (TE). Concentrations of most TE were higher in branches than in stems. Spatial variations of V, Co, Ni and Zn can be related to anthropogenic activities while Al, Sc, Fe, Rb, Cs, Th and U varied depending on chemical peculiarities of the coastal zone rocks. TE concentrations in C. crinita from marine protected areas near Tarkhankut peninsula and Cape Fiolent, identified as the most clean water areas, are submitted as the background concentrations.


Kravtsova A.V.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Kravtsova A.V.,Joint Institute for Nuclear Research | Milchakova N.A.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Frontasyeva M.V.,Joint Institute for Nuclear Research
Marine Pollution Bulletin | Year: 2015

Levels of Al, Sc, V, Co, Ni, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Ag, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, Th and U that were rarely or never studied, as well as the concentrations of classically investigated Mn, Fe and Zn in brown algae Cystoseira barbata C. Ag. and Cystoseira crinita (Desf.) Bory from the coastal waters of marine protected areas (Crimea, Black Sea), were determined using neutron activation analysis. Spatial variation and compartmentalization were studied for all 19 trace elements (TE). Concentrations of most TE were higher in "branches" than in "stems". Spatial variations of V, Co, Ni and Zn can be related to anthropogenic activities while Al, Sc, Fe, Rb, Cs, Th and U varied depending on chemical peculiarities of the coastal zone rocks. TE concentrations in C. crinita from marine protected areas near Tarkhankut peninsula and Cape Fiolent, identified as the most clean water areas, are submitted as the background concentrations. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Finenko Z.Z.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Suslin V.V.,Marine Hydrophysical Institute | Kovaleva I.V.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas
Oceanology | Year: 2014

The spatial and temporal variability of the chlorophyll (Chl) concentration in the surface water layer of the Black Sea in 1998–2008 has been analyzed using the data obtained by the SeaWiFS satellite sensor. In the deep-sea areas, the seasonal pattern of the Chl concentration is represented by a U-shape curve. The maximal concentrations are observed in the winter-spring and autumn periods, while the minimal, in the summertime. In the northwestern Black Sea, the maximal concentrations are registered in mostly the summer and autumn periods. Pronounced interannual variability is found for the summer concentrations of Chl observed for an 11-year period. After a cold winter, the concentration of Chl in the spring period is 3–5 times higher compared to the mild-winter years. In December–March, a negative correlation between the water temperature and the average Chl concentration is registered. © 2014, Pleiades Publishing, Inc.


Anufriieva E.V.,Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences | Anufriieva E.V.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas
Chinese Journal of Oceanology and Limnology | Year: 2015

A small number of copepod species have adapted to an existence in the extreme habitat of hypersaline water. 13 copepod species have been recorded in the hypersaline waters of Crimea (the largest peninsula in the Black Sea with over 50 hypersaline lakes). Summarizing our own and literature data, the author concludes that the Crimean extreme environment is not an exception: copepod species dwell in hypersaline waters worldwide. There are at least 26 copepod species around the world living at salinity above 100; among them 12 species are found at salinity higher than 200. In the Crimea Cletocamptus retrogressus is found at salinity 360×10-3 (with a density of 1 320 individuals/m3) and Arctodiaptomus salinus at salinity 300×10-3 (with a density of 343 individuals/m3). Those species are probably the most halotolerant copepod species in the world. High halotolerance of osmoconforming copepods may be explained by exoosmolyte consumption, mainly with food. High tolerance to many factors in adults, availability of resting stages, and an opportunity of long-distance transportation of resting stages by birds and/or winds are responsible for the wide geographic distribution of these halophilic copepods. © 2015, Chinese Society for Oceanology and Limnology, Science Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


El-Shabrawy G.M.,National Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries of Egypt | Anufriieva E.V.,Institute of Mineral Resources | Anufriieva E.V.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Germoush M.O.,Al Jouf University | And 3 more authors.
Chinese Journal of Oceanology and Limnology | Year: 2015

Zooplankton and 14 abiotic variables were studied during August 2011 at 10 stations in Lake Qarun, Egypt. Stations with the lowest salinity and highest nutrient concentrations and turbidity were close to the discharge of waters from the El-Bats and El-Wadi drainage systems. A total of 15 holozooplankton species were identified. The salinity in Lake Qarun increased and fluctuated since 1901: 12 g/L in 1901; 8.5 g/L in 1905; 12.0 g/L in 1922; 30.0 g/L in 1985; 38.7 g/L in 1994; 35.3 g/L in 2006, and 33.4 g/L in 2011. The mean concentration of nutrients (nitrate, nitrite and orthophosphate) gradually increased from 35, 0.16 and 0.38 µg/L, respectively, in 1953–1955 to 113, 16.4, and 30.26 µg/L in 2011. From 1999–2003 some decrease of species diversity occurred. Average total zooplankton density was 30 000 ind./m3 in 1974–1977; 356 125 ind./m3 in 1989; 534 000 ind./m3 in 1994–1995; from 965 000 to 1 452 000 ind./m3 in 2006, and 595 000 ind./m3 in 2011. A range of long-term summer salinity variability during the last decades was very similar to a range of salinity spatial variability in summer 2011. There is no significant correlation between zooplankton abundance and salinity in spatial and long-term changes. We conclude that salinity fluctuations since at least 1955 did not directly drive the changes of composition and abundance of zooplankton in the lake. A marine community had formed in the lake, and it continues to change. One of the main drivers of this change is a regular introduction and a pressure of alien species on the existent community. Eutrophication also plays an important role. The introduction of Mnemiopsis leidyi, first reported in 2014, may lead to a start of a new stage of the biotic changes in Lake Qarun, when eutrophication and the population dynamics of this ctenophore will be main drivers of the ecosystem change. © 2015, Chinese Society for Oceanology and Limnology, Science Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Jia Q.,Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences | Anufriieva E.,Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences | Anufriieva E.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Liu X.,Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences | And 3 more authors.
Chinese Journal of Oceanology and Limnology | Year: 2015

The imbalance between supply and demand of Artemia cysts in China and around the world is increasing now. Salt lakes in Tibet may contribute to the solution of the problem. In Northern Tibet there are 26 saline lakes whose salinity and temperature may support Artemia survival at an altitude of 4 000–5 100 m. We found Artemia in 15 of these lakes. The saline lakes with Artemia populations mainly belong to the shallow basin lakes, and the majority of these lakes are small in area. The total area of lakes without Artemia is more than 1 000 km2. Lake Dangxiong Co (Co means lake in Tibet) was chosen for the intentional introduction of Artemia sinica. In 2004, 850 g of A. sinica cysts, originating from Qinghai, were introduced in the lake. Surveys in 2006–2014 showed that the average abundance of Artemia adults in the lake gradually increased from 20 ind./m3 in 2006 to 1950 ind./m3 in 2013. We assume that two subpopulations of A. sinica, separated by depth, may exist in the lake. The new Artemia population caused an increase in the number of species of phytoplankton and heterotrophic protozoa with a decrease of their total abundance. Water transparency also increased. Dominance in phytoplankton passed from cyanobacteria to diatoms. Changes occurred not only in the lake ecosystem; the number of water birds using the lakes also dramatically increased. Preliminary calculations showed that is it possible to harvest at least about 150 t cysts per year from the lake as well as 3.2 thousand tons of frozen or 350 t of dried biomass of adult Artemia. © 2015, Chinese Society for Oceanology and Limnology, Science Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Karpova E.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Boltachev A.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Statkevich S.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Danylyuk O.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Turbanov I.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas
Turkish Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences | Year: 2015

In this study, cryptobenthic communities of fishes and decapod in underwater caves of Tarkhankut peninsula, underwater caves of southwestern Crimea and mussel’s farm in Sebastopol were described. Structure and features of cryptobenthic fauna were considered for mussel’s settlements and underwater habitat (caves and grottoes), the study of which is extremely complex and are sketchy and incomplete in the Black Sea. In the cryptobenthic fish community of the mussel fouling two new for Crimea fish species - zebra goby Zebrus zebrus and small-headed clingfish Apletodon dentatus, were discovered, both of them were previously found only sporadically in the southern part of the Black Sea. For the first time early developmental stage and morphometric characteristics of the Black Sea population of zebra goby were studied, this made it possible to identify the morphological differences between similar species Zebrus zebrus and Millerigobius macrocephalus. Some morphological features of the Black Sea population Apletodon dentatus, which is one of the rarest species of this genus, have been described. Species biodiversity and quantitative relationships in the crypthodentic decapod community was investigated. Adult specimens of two rare species of shrimp (Lismata seticaudata, Alpheus dentipes), previously known in this area for only a few find plankton larvae were first found in the fauna of decapods of southwestern Crimea. Results from study confirm that it is promisingly investigate the species diversity and abundance of cryptobenthic species fish and decapod in artificial populations of mussel fouling. © Published by Central Fisheries Research Institute (CFRI) Trabzon, Turkey.


Sergeeva N.G.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Zaika V.E.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Anikeeva O.V.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas
Ecologica Montenegrina | Year: 2015

A research program to study Black Sea meiobenthos yielded extensive data on foraminifera with either a soft or a hard shell. Samples were taken in different parts of the Sea, ranging from shallow bays to the layer of constant hypoxia over-lying sulphidic waters. A review of new information on the species composition of single-chambered foraminifera (i.e. monothalamids, sometimes termed 'allogromiids') is presented. The data on the ratio of the number of soft-shelled monothalamids and multi-chambered hard-shelled foraminifera in shallow water on the shelf and in the layer of permanent hypoxia are given. It is shown that in many habitats the number of single-chambered species is higher than total number of multi-chambered taxa. Monothalamids are more resistant to hypoxia, they are found closer to the boundary of sulfidic waters, and they occupy deeper sediment layers.


Sergeeva N.,Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas | Dovgal I.,Schmalhausen Institute of Zoology
Ecologica Montenegrina | Year: 2014

Three species of commensal ciliates (Cothurnia maritima Ehrenberg, 1838 on oligochaete Tubificoides sp.; Paracineta livadiana (Mereschkowsky, 1881) and Corynophrya lyngbyi (Ehrenberg, 1834) on harpacticoid copepods Amphiascella subdebilis (Willey, 1935), Haloschizopera pontarchis Por, 1959, Cletodes tenuipes Scott, 1896 and Enhydrosoma longifurcatum Sars, 1909) were found in the Black Sea deep-water under hypoxic/anoxic conditions for the first time. Corynophrya lyngbyi is reported for the first time in the Black Sea.

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