Institute Of Biologia Evolutiva Ibe

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Institute Of Biologia Evolutiva Ibe

Barcelona, Spain
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Fernandes A.S.,Institute Of Biologia Evolutiva Ibe | Hamada N.,National Institute of Amazonian Research
Journal of Natural History | Year: 2012

Potamophilops bragaorum sp. nov. is described and illustrated based on adult specimens collected in a mountainous area in the Cerrado biome in Taquaruçú district, Tocantins state, Brazil. This is the second species described in the genus and it represents the northernmost record of Potamophilops, which is known only from Argentina and Brazil. In this article we provide a diagnosis, details on the morphology and images of the habitus and structures used to determine the species and to distinguish the gender. Field observations permitted the description of some aspects on the biology of the new species that seem to be very similar to those of other Larainae genera. Examination of gut contents revealed a diet based mostly on periphyton. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Gomez-Diaz E.,Institute Of Biologia Evolutiva Ibe | Gomez-Diaz E.,IRD Montpellier | Morris-Pocock J.A.,IRD Montpellier | Morris-Pocock J.A.,Queen's University | And 2 more authors.
Biology Letters | Year: 2012

Parasites represent ideal models for unravelling biogeographic patterns and mechanisms of diversification on islands. Both host-mediated dispersal and within-island adaptation can shape parasite island assemblages. In this study, we examined patterns of genetic diversity and structure of Ornithodoros seabird ticks within the Cape Verde Archipelago in relation to their global phylogeography. Contrary to expectations, ticks from multiple, geographically distant clades mixed within the archipelago. Trans-oceanic colonization via host movements probably explains high local tick diversity, contrasting with previous research that suggests little large-scale dispersal in these birds. Although host specificity was not obvious at a global scale, host-associated genetic structure was found within Cape Verde colonies, indicating that post-colonization adaptation to specific hosts probably occurs. These results highlight the role of host metapopulation dynamics in the evolutionary ecology and epidemiology of avian parasites and pathogens. This journal is © 2012 The Royal Society.


Noel V.,IRD Montpellier | Leger E.,IRD Montpellier | Gomez-Diaz E.,IRD Montpellier | Gomez-Diaz E.,Institute Of Biologia Evolutiva Ibe | And 2 more authors.
Acarologia | Year: 2012

Nine microsatellite markers were isolated from unfed larvae of Ixodes ricinus and were tested on two populations of nymphs collected on roe deer (N=21) and birds (N=39) in a French suburban forest. All markers were polymorphic, with limited evidence for deviations from linkage equilibrium. In accordance with previous markers developed for this species, we found large heterozygote deficits for six of the nine loci. Deficits were of the same order of magnitude within a tick infrapopulation, suggesting that population-level estimates were not due to a Wahlund effect among individual hosts, but more likely to technical problems (i.e., null alleles due to mutations in the flanking regions of the microsatellites). Although micro-geographic substructure (e.g., homogamy within infrapopulations) can not be ruled out, it is possible that null alleles could be an inherent problem associated with this tick species and specific genome-level studies are called for. Despite the possible presence of null alleles, the precision of population genetic estimates was improved by the addition of the newly-developed markers making them a useful addition for studying the population ecology of I. ricinus. © Noel V. et al.


Gomez-Diaz E.,Institute Of Biologia Evolutiva Ibe | Jorda M.,Institute Of Medicina Predictiva I Personalitzada Del Cancer Imppc | Peinado M.A.,Institute Of Medicina Predictiva I Personalitzada Del Cancer Imppc | Rivero A.,IRD Montpellier
PLoS Pathogens | Year: 2012

A growing body of evidence points towards epigenetic mechanisms being responsible for a wide range of biological phenomena, from the plasticity of plant growth and development to the nutritional control of caste determination in honeybees and the etiology of human disease (e.g., cancer). With the (partial) elucidation of the molecular basis of epigenetic variation and the heritability of certain of these changes, the field of evolutionary epigenetics is flourishing. Despite this, the role of epigenetics in shaping host-pathogen interactions has received comparatively little attention. Yet there is plenty of evidence supporting the implication of epigenetic mechanisms in the modulation of the biological interaction between hosts and pathogens. The phenotypic plasticity of many key parasite life-history traits appears to be under epigenetic control. Moreover, pathogen-induced effects in host phenotype may have transgenerational consequences, and the bases of these changes and their heritability probably have an epigenetic component. The significance of epigenetic modifications may, however, go beyond providing a mechanistic basis for host and pathogen plasticity. Epigenetic epidemiology has recently emerged as a promising area for future research on infectious diseases. In addition, the incorporation of epigenetic inheritance and epigenetic plasticity mechanisms to evolutionary models and empirical studies of host-pathogen interactions will provide new insights into the evolution and coevolution of these associations. Here, we review the evidence available for the role epigenetics on host-pathogen interactions, and the utility and versatility of the epigenetic technologies available that can be cross-applied to host-pathogen studies. We conclude with recommendations and directions for future research on the burgeoning field of epigenetics as applied to host-pathogen interactions. © 2012 Gómez-Díaz et al.


Hernando C.,Apartado de Correos 118 | Castro A.,IES Clara Campoamor | Ribera I.,Institute Of Biologia Evolutiva Ibe | Ribera I.,CSIC - National Museum of Natural Sciences
Zootaxa | Year: 2012

We describe Hydroporus bithynicus sp. n. (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Hydroporinae) from the Bolu province in north-western Turkey. The species belongs to the newly defined H. ferrugineus group, and can be separated from the other two members (H. ferrugineus Stephens, 1829 and H. sanfilippoi Ghidini, 1958) by its more flattened shape, less developed eyes and shape of male genitalia. Its external morphology and the habitat in which all specimens were found (a small pool with upwelling spring water next to a stream) suggest an interstitial habitat, similar to that reported for other species of the group. We present a molecular phylogeny of the species of the H. memnonius and H. longulus groups, including some representatives of the main lineages within the genus, based on ca. 2 kb of four mitochondrial genes. We redefine the H. memnonius group and recognise the H. ferrugineus, H. obsoletus and H. morio groups of species as separate entities. Hydroporus neglectus Schaum, 1845 was found to be related to the species of the H. angustatus, but not the H. memnonius group. © 2012, Magnolia Press.


Bruno D.,University of Murcia | Belmar O.,IRSTEA | Sanchez-Fernandez D.,Institute Of Biologia Evolutiva Ibe | Velasco J.,University of Murcia
Hydrobiologia | Year: 2014

What environmental variables determine riparian vegetation patterns? Are there differences between woody and herbaceous species? To answer these questions, we first explored the composition and richness patterns of both riparian woody and herbaceous species in a semi-arid mediterranean basin. Then, we assessed the environmental factors (climate, geology, topography, hydrogeomorphology and land use) that best explain these patterns. We used the following methodological approaches: clustering analyses, distance-based linear models, generalised linear models and hierarchical partitioning procedures. Valley shape, drought duration, river habitat heterogeneity, water conductivity and agricultural land use were the most important variables explaining variation in species composition for both groups. Woody riparian richness was mainly influenced by flow conditions and valley shape, whereas herbaceous one was more dependent on substrate features. Thus, although some differences in the importance of individual variables were observed, we found a notable congruence in the composition and species richness of both groups and also in the main types of variables explaining these patterns (hydrogeomorphology and land use, especially agriculture). Our results show that both communities could be treated in a holistic way, since they respond similarly to the strong natural and anthropogenic environmental gradients present in mediterranean basins. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


PubMed | Institute Of Biologia Evolutiva Ibe
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biology letters | Year: 2012

Parasites represent ideal models for unravelling biogeographic patterns and mechanisms of diversification on islands. Both host-mediated dispersal and within-island adaptation can shape parasite island assemblages. In this study, we examined patterns of genetic diversity and structure of Ornithodoros seabird ticks within the Cape Verde Archipelago in relation to their global phylogeography. Contrary to expectations, ticks from multiple, geographically distant clades mixed within the archipelago. Trans-oceanic colonization via host movements probably explains high local tick diversity, contrasting with previous research that suggests little large-scale dispersal in these birds. Although host specificity was not obvious at a global scale, host-associated genetic structure was found within Cape Verde colonies, indicating that post-colonization adaptation to specific hosts probably occurs. These results highlight the role of host metapopulation dynamics in the evolutionary ecology and epidemiology of avian parasites and pathogens.


PubMed | Institute Of Biologia Evolutiva Ibe
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular ecology | Year: 2012

The Socotra Archipelago is an ancient continental fragment of Gondwanan origin and one of the most isolated landforms on Earth and a biodiversity hot spot. Yet, the biogeography and evolutionary history of its endemic fauna still remain largely overlooked. We investigate the origin, tempo and mode of diversification in the Hemidactylus geckos of the Socotra Archipelago. Concatenated and multilocus species coalescent analyses of Hemidactylus from Arabia and North Africa indicate that the Hemidactylus from Socotra do not form a monophyletic group and branch as three independent and well-supported clades instead. Both the chronogram inferred using the gene tree approach of BEAST and the age-calibrated multilocus species tree obtained using *BEAST suggest that the origin of Hemidactylus from Socotra may have involved a first vicariance event that occurred in the Early Miocene, followed by two independent transoceanic dispersal events that occurred more recently, during the Pliocene. Within Socotra, we analysed patterns of genetic diversity, the phylogeography and the demographic history in all seven nonintroduced species of Hemidactylus. Results based on two mitochondrial and two nuclear loci from 144 individuals revealed complex patterns of within-island diversification and high levels of intra-species genetic divergence. The interplay of both historical and ecological factors seems to have a role in the speciation process of this group of geckos. Interestingly, the case of H. forbesii and H. oxyrhinus, which inhabit the island of Abd al Kuri with an area of 133 km(2), may represent one of the most extreme cases of intra-island speciation in reptiles ever reported.

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