Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Passos M.F.,Institute of Biofabrication INCT BIOFABRIS | Passos M.F.,University of Campinas | Bineli A.R.R.,Institute of Biofabrication INCT BIOFABRIS | Bineli A.R.R.,University of Campinas | And 6 more authors.
Chemical Engineering Transactions | Year: 2011

The poly 2 - hydroxy ethyl methacrylate (pHEMA) is a hydrogel very versatile in the field of medicine, due to its properties of biocompatibility, similar to the soft tissues of the body. It is easy to prepare and can be applied as substitute natural articular cartilage. For this application the use of infrared laser allow to irradiate the polymer and obtain the localized cure with the required design and properties of the final product. In order that, it becomes important to have a well established and controlled process so that it is possible to have rapid and localized cure of polymer to prevent the dissipation of energy in unwanted regions. This is a necessary issue where the goal is the replacement of articular cartilage in regions with specific geometries. Bearing all these in mind, in this work is proposed and used a simulation tool to predict, and diagnose the temperature distribution during the localized cure of pHEMA. This allows determining the operating parameters of the process, such as temperature and curing time and laser power. These parameters were entered into the system with infrared laser and were able to get the pHEMA hydrogels by radiation of solutions of 2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with data previously determined by simulation. The computational tools make use of fluid dynamics (CFD) implemented in ANSYS CFX ®. © 2011, AIDIC Servizi S.r.l. Source


Larosa M.A.,Institute of Biofabrication INCT BIOFABRIS | Larosa M.A.,University of Campinas | Jardini A.L.,Institute of Biofabrication INCT BIOFABRIS | Jardini A.L.,University of Campinas | And 8 more authors.
Advances in Mechanical Engineering | Year: 2014

Custom-built implants manufacture has always presented difficulties which result in high cost and complex fabrication, mainly due to patients' anatomical differences. The solution has been to produce prostheses with different sizes and use the one that best suits each patient. Additive manufacturing technology, incorporated into the medical field in the late 80's, has made it possible to obtain solid biomodels facilitating surgical procedures and reducing risks. Furthermore, this technology has been used to produce implants especially designed for a particular patient, with sizes, shapes, and mechanical properties optimized, for different areas of medicine such as craniomaxillofacial surgery. In this work, the microstructural and mechanical properties of Ti6Al4V samples produced by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) are studied. The microstructural and mechanical characterizations have been made by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness and tensile tests. Samples produced by DMLS have a microstructure constituted by hexagonal ′ martensite with acicular morphology. An average microhardness of 370 HV was obtained and the tensile tests showed ultimate strength of 1172 MPa, yield strength of 957 MPa, and elongation at rupture of 11%. © 2014 Maria Aparecida Larosa et al. Source


Jardini A.L.,Institute of Biofabrication INCT BIOFABRIS | Jardini A.L.,University of Campinas | Larosa M.A.,Institute of Biofabrication INCT BIOFABRIS | Larosa M.A.,University of Campinas | And 12 more authors.
Virtual and Physical Prototyping | Year: 2014

Customised implants manufacture has always presented difficulties which result in high cost and complex fabrication, mainly due to patients' anatomical differences. The solution has been to produce prostheses with different sizes and use the one that best suits each patient. Additive manufacturing (AM) as a technology from engineering has been providing several advancements in the medical field, particularly as far as fabrication of implants is concerned. The use of additive manufacturing in medicine has added, in an era of development of so many new technologies, the possibility of performing the surgical planning and simulation by using a three-dimensional (3D) physical model, very faithful to the patient's anatomy. AM is a technology that enables the production of models and implants directly from the 3D virtual model (obtained by a Computer-Aided Design (CAD) system, computed tomography or magnetic resonance) facilitating surgical procedures and reducing risks. Furthermore, additive manufacturing has been used to produce implants especially designed for a particular patient, with sizes, shapes and mechanical properties optimised, for areas of medicine such as craniomaxillofacial surgery. This work presents how AM technologies were applied to design and fabricate a biomodel and customised implant for the surgical reconstruction of a large cranial defect. A series of computed tomography data was obtained and software was used to extract the cranial geometry. The protocol presented was used for creation of an anatomic biomodel of the bone defect for the surgical planning and, finally, the design and manufacture of the patient-specific implant. © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Source

Discover hidden collaborations