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Hao H.-J.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | Han W.-D.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science
Medical Journal of Chinese People's Liberation Army | Year: 2016

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder caused by relative or absolute insulin deficient or reduced sensitivity of target cells to insulin. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with multiple differentiation potential, self-renewable and immunoregulatory properties. Accumulating evidences from clinic or animal experiments recent years showed that MSCs infusion could ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetes. The research progress of MSCs in diabetes treatment is summarized and a corresponding perspective is herewith proposed in present paper. © 2016, People’s Military Medical Press. All rights reserved. Source


Tong C.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | Li R.-S.,Research Center for Clinical and Transnational Medicine | Hao H.-J.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | Ti D.-D.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | And 7 more authors.
Medical Journal of Chinese People's Liberation Army | Year: 2016

Objective To investigate the effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) on macrophage polarization under hypoxia. Methods hUC-MSCs were obtained by explants adherent culture and cultured under normoxia (21% O2) and hypoxia (5% O2). The multi-directional differentiation of hUC-MSCs was observed by osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation induction. Live/death staining was performed to detect the cell viability, and ELISA was executed to detect the protein content in supernatant of hUC-MSCs. Transwell chamber was employed to co-culture the hUC-MSCs cultured under normoxia and hypoxia and macrophage (THP-1) stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (IPS), then the polarization of THP-1 was detected by immunofluorescence, and the secretions of inflammatory factor and anti-inflammatory factor of THP-1 were detected by ELISA. Results hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia showed the ability of osteogenic and adipogenic multi-directional differentiation. Live/death staining showed the high cell viability of hUC-MSCs cultured under normoxia and hypoxia. The expression levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) were significantly higher in the hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia than in those cultured under normoxia. hUCMSCs cultured under hypoxia promoted the polarization of THP-1 to M2, obviously reduced the expression of TNF-α and IL-1β, and increased the expression of IL-10 significantly. Conclusion hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia may promote the polarization of THP-1 to M2 and improve the viability of anti-inflammatory. © 2016, People’s Military Medical Press. All rights reserved. Source


Hao H.-J.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | Liu J.-J.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | Han W.-D.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science
Medical Journal of Chinese People's Liberation Army | Year: 2016

Objective To evaluate the temporary hypoglycemic effect of adipose mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) on type 2 diabetic rats, and further discuss the mechanisms of AD-MSCs regulating blood glucose through hepatic glycometabolism. Methods The type 2 diabetic rat model was established by intraperitoneal injection of a single small dose of streptozotocin (STZ, 25mg/kg) after a high-fat diet for 8 weeks. The content of blood glucose was determined by tail vein bleeding at indicated time points (0h, 3h, 6h, 12h, 24h) after infusion of AD-MSCs, concurrently the rats were executed and the liver tissues were collected (diabetes group, n=5, normal group, n=3) for detecting the mRNA and protein expressions of glucokinase (GK), pyruvate kinase (PK) and phosphofructokinase (PFK) (the key enzyme of glycolysis) by real-time qPCR and Western blotting. Results The infusion of AD-MSCs significantly decreased blood glucose in a short period [30.55 1.49mmol/L(0h), 18.90 0.85mmol/L(3h), 23.70 1.13mmol/L(6h), 21.90 1.00mmol/L(12h), respectively]. PCR results showed that the expressions of GK and PFK increased in the liver tissue of type 2 diabetic rats 3h after AD-MSCs infusion, and the expression of PK increased significantly 6h after AD-MSCs infusion (P<0.05). Conclusion AD-MSCs can ameliorate hyperglycemia rapidly through enhancing liver glycolysis in type 2 diabetic rats. © 2016, People’s Military Medical Press. All rights reserved. Source


Ti D.-D.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | Li J.-F.,Shanxi Management Vocational College | Hao H.-J.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | Tong C.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | And 6 more authors.
Medical Journal of Chinese People's Liberation Army | Year: 2016

Objective To study the therapeutic effect of exosome derived from lipopolysaccharides (LPS) priming mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for diabetic wound healing. Methods Human umbilical cord MSCs were treated with LPS (100ng/ml) for 2 days, the supernatant were then collected, and exosomes were harvested by density gradient centrifugation and identified. Diabetic cutaneous wounds were prepared and the animals were divided into the following three groups: control group, untreated MSCs derived exosome (un-exosome) treatment group and LPS primed MSCs derived exosome (LPS-exosome) treatment group. Exosomes (60μg) were injected dispersively into the wound edge daily for 10 days. After treatment, the therapeutic results were evaluated by gross observation of the wounds, the expression levels of inflammation related factors and macrophage subtype markers in the injured sites were detected by qRT-PCR at day 3, 7 and 14 after treatment. Results Compared with control group, the diabetic wound healing was obviously improved in LPS-exosome treatment group after treatment for 7 and 14 days, with faster wound close, depressed expression of pro-inflammatory factors IL-1, IL-12 and M1 macrophage surface marker iNOS, and upregulation of anti-inflammatory factors IL-10, TGF-β and M2 macrophage surface marker CD163, the differences were significant (P<0.05). Conclusions LPS-exosome may balance macrophage plasticity, restrain chronic inflammation and accelerate diabetic cutaneous wound healing. © 2016, People’s Military Medical Press. All rights reserved. Source


Hao H.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | Tong C.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | Liu J.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | Si Y.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science | Han W.,Institute of Basic Medicine Science
Stem Cells | Year: 2015

Insulin resistance, a major characteristic of type 2 diabetes (T2D), is closely associated with adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) that induce chronic low-grade inflammation. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified in alleviation of insulin resistance. However, the underlying mechanism still remains elusive. Thus, we aimed to investigate whether the effect of MSCs on insulin resistance was related to macrophages phenotypes in adipose tissues of T2D rats. In this study, human umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UC-MSCs) infusion produced significantly anti-diabetic effects and promoted insulin sensitivity in T2D rats that were induced by a high-fat diet combined with streptozotocin and directed ATMs into an alternatively activated phenotype (M2, anti-inflammatory). In vitro, MSC-induced M2 macrophages alleviated insulin resistance caused by classically activated macrophages (M1, pro-inflammatory). Further analysis showed that M1 stimulated UC-MSCs to increase expression of interleukin (IL)-6, a molecule which upregulated IL4R expression, promoted phosphorylation of STAT6 in macrophages, and eventually polarized macrophages into M2 phenotype. Moreover, the UC-MSCs effect on macrophages was largely abrogated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of IL-6. Together, our results indicate that UC-MSCs can alleviate insulin resistance in part via production of IL-6 that elicits M2 polarization. Additionally, human obesity and insulin resistance were associated with increased pro-inflammatory ATMs infiltration. Thus, MSCs may be a new treatment for obesity-related insulin resistance and T2D concerning macrophage polarized effects. © 2015 AlphaMed Press. Source

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