Institute of Applied Magnetism

Madrid, Spain

Institute of Applied Magnetism

Madrid, Spain
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Spottorno J.,Institute of Applied Magnetism | Spottorno J.,Complutense University of Madrid | Multigner M.,Institute of Applied Magnetism | Multigner M.,Complutense University of Madrid | And 6 more authors.
Bioelectromagnetics | Year: 2012

Calculations of the induced currents created in the human body by external electromagnetic fields would be more accurate provided that more realistic experimental values of the electrical properties of the body were available. The purpose of this work is to experimentally obtain values for the conductivity of living organs in conditions close to the real situation. Two-electrode in vivo measurements of the bioimpedance of some porcine organs have been performed. From these measurements and taking into account geometrical considerations, the electrical conductivity for the kidney, liver, heart, and spinal cord has been obtained and were found to be higher than the values reported in the literature. Furthermore, a new experimental procedure is proposed where the conductivity is determined from the values of the electrical potential and currents that are induced by an external electromagnetic field created by a coil placed close to the organ under study. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | Institute of Applied Magnetism
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bioelectromagnetics | Year: 2012

Calculations of the induced currents created in the human body by external electromagnetic fields would be more accurate provided that more realistic experimental values of the electrical properties of the body were available. The purpose of this work is to experimentally obtain values for the conductivity of living organs in conditions close to the real situation. Two-electrode in vivo measurements of the bioimpedance of some porcine organs have been performed. From these measurements and taking into account geometrical considerations, the electrical conductivity for the kidney, liver, heart, and spinal cord has been obtained and were found to be higher than the values reported in the literature. Furthermore, a new experimental procedure is proposed where the conductivity is determined from the values of the electrical potential and currents that are induced by an external electromagnetic field created by a coil placed close to the organ under study.

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