Institute of Agricultural and Food Research and Development

La Alberca de Záncara, Spain

Institute of Agricultural and Food Research and Development

La Alberca de Záncara, Spain
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Serrano R.,University of Murcia | Jordan M.J.,Institute of Agricultural and Food Research and Development | Banon S.,University of Murcia
Small Ruminant Research | Year: 2014

The use of a dietary rosemary extract (DRE) composed of carnosic acid and carnosol at a 2:1 (w/w) ratio is proposed to extend the shelf life of raw and cooked lamb. The sheep diet was supplemented with 600. mg DRE per kg feed during pregnancy and lactation (ewe) and/or fattening (lamb) stages. Meat quality was evaluated in packed raw fillets and cooked patties kept at retail for up to 21 and 4 days, respectively. DRE extended ( P<. 0.05) the shelf life of rawfillets from 9 to 11 days, delaying lipid oxidation and rancidity and, to a lesser extent, colour deterioration and microbial spoilage. By contrast, DRE did not extend the shelf life of cooked patties, because the oxidising status on lamb meat after mincing, heating and retailing exceeded the antioxidant potential of the DRE used. Taking these limitations into account, the treatment with DRE should be limited to fattening lamb alone, which reduces feeding costs, since DRE intake by pregnant and lactating ewes barely extended the shelf life of lamb fillets. Rosemary-based diets can be used as a nutritional strategy for improving lamb quality, although the extract composition should be modified to attempt to increase the degree of meat preservation, in particular, in the cooked meat. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Nieto G.,University of Murcia | Estrada M.,University of Murcia | Jordan M.J.,Institute of Agricultural and Food Research and Development | Garrido M.D.,University of Murcia | Banon S.,University of Murcia
Food Chemistry | Year: 2011

Distilled dietary rosemary leaf (DRL) was tested to prevent lipid oxidation and sensory deterioration of cooked lamb under retail display conditions. Pregnant sheep were fed with a basal diet supplemented by 0%, 10% and 20% DRL. Cooked lamb fillets were stored for 0, 2 or 4 days at a temperature of 4°C in a display cabinet and re-heated, simulating catering practices. The cooked lamb suffered rapid lipid oxidation and odour and flavour spoilage associated with slight rancidity and warmed-over flavour, and, to a lesser extent, with loss of colour and juiciness. DRL feeding delayed lipid oxidation measured as TBARS and volatile compounds, this being more effective in the first two days of storage. 10% and 20% of DRL provided equal antioxidant capacity. However, DRL feeding hardly prevented sensory deterioration, although incipient rancidity was delayed. Feeding DRL to ewes contributed to extend the shelf life of cooked lamb under retail display conditions. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Ortuno J.,University of Murcia | Serrano R.,University of Murcia | Jordan M.J.,Institute of Agricultural and Food Research and Development | Banon S.,University of Murcia
Meat Science | Year: 2014

The use of dietary rosemary extract (DRE) at low doses is proposed as a nutritional strategy to improve meat preservation. Lamb diet was supplemented with 0, 200 or 400. mg DRE (containing carnosic acid and carnosol at 1:1 w:w) per kg feed during the fattening stage. Meat quality was evaluated in lamb fillets packed under protective atmosphere and kept in retail conditions for up to 14. days. The effects of diet and storage time were determined on different physical-chemical (L*a*b* color, pH, TBARS, protein oxidation and volatiles from lipid oxidation), microbial (total viable and psychrophilic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, molds and yeasts) and sensory (appearance and odor) characteristics of the meat. The antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of DRE on meat were demonstrated. DRE delayed lean and fat discoloration, lipid oxidation, odor deterioration and microbial spoilage, extending the shelf life time of fillets from around 9 to 13. days. Both DRE doses provided similar shelf life extension. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Almela E.,University of Murcia | Jordan M.J.,Institute of Agricultural and Food Research and Development | Martinez C.,Institute of Agricultural and Food Research and Development | Sotomayor J.A.,Institute of Agricultural and Food Research and Development | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2010

The effects of ewe s diet during gestation and lactation on the volatile compounds profile in cooked meat from light lamb were compared. Two lamb groups from ewes that had been fed pasture (PA) or grain-based concentrate (FE) were tested. Cooked loin mixed with saliva was analyzed by solid phase microextraction, gas chromatography, and mass spectrometry. The fiber coating used was divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane. The volatiles detected and quantified were aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, phenols, indole, and sulfur compounds. The ewe s diet strongly affected the volatile compounds profile of the cooked meat. The total volatiles concentration was higher in PA (409 mg kg-1) than in FE (201 mg kg-1). The major volatiles in PA were phenol, 4-methylphenol, and hexanoic acid, while the major volatile in FE was 3-hydroxy-2-butanone. No branched C8-C9 fatty acids responsible for mutton flavor were detected in either group. The findings suggest that nutritional strategies can be use during gestation and lactation to modify the aroma of light lamb meat in the light of consumer preferences. © 2010 American Chemical Society.


PubMed | Institute of Agricultural and Food Research and Development and University of Murcia
Type: | Journal: Food chemistry | Year: 2015

The relationship between the antioxidant status of fresh meat and oxidative stability of chilled-packed meat obtained from lambs fed on a diet supplemented with two different doses of a rosemary extract containing carnosic acid and carnosol was studied. The incorporation of rosemary extract in the lamb diet led to the deposition of functional levels of the diterpenic metabolite C19H22O3 in meat, which improved its stability against oxidation. The antioxidant status could be assessed through both the radical scavenging capacity (DPPH and TEAC) and the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). In general, antioxidant status values correlated better (P < 0.05) with the changes in CIELAB colour, malondialdehyde and sensory scoring than with the changes in hexanal and protein carboxylation measured in the lamb cuts kept under protective atmosphere for up to 14 days. The FRAP and DPPH assays were more suitable than the TEAC assay for predicting meat oxidation and any resulting discolouration and rancidity.

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