Institute of Agricultural and Fishery Research and Training IFAPA

Granada, Spain

Institute of Agricultural and Fishery Research and Training IFAPA

Granada, Spain
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Calatrava J.,Institute of Agricultural and Fishery Research and Training IFAPA | Sayadi S.,Institute of Agricultural and Fishery Research and Training IFAPA | Sarmiento D.,TROPS | Guirado E.,Spanish Research Council CSIC
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2013

Mango growing has been developing on the Spanish Mediterranean coast over the last 25 years, currently occupying more than 3,300 ha, with a clear increasing trend; 70% of this surface area is planted with the cultivar 'Osteen' (early-mid season). In the coastal area 'Osteen' has good vegetative performance, high average fruit yield with acceptable pulp quality, size, shape, and uniformity as well as attractive color suitable for marketing. Also 'Osteen' is quite tolerant to Ceratitis capitata attacks. As a drawback, the taste characteristics of the fruit, although acceptable, are far from excellent, and 'Osteen' is susceptible to internal breakdown, one of the main troubles of mango in the region. Because of the predominance of 'Osteen' in Spanish mango cultivation, the 'Osteen' is, to some extent identified as the "Spanish mango" in the export market, particularly in the French market. It is, however, a cultivar selected in the 1950s in Florida, USA. For the current low production in Spain (8,000 t), such a lack of supply diversification could be acceptable, but forecast figures for the next five years indicate that Spain will produce more than 25,000 t. and, for this short-term future, greater diversification of cultivars would be advisable. Although it is low-medium yield compared with 'Osteen', the cultivar 'Kent', due to its excellent taste characteristics and its good value in the market is perceived by growers as one of the possible alternatives to 'Osteen' in order to diversify the Spanish supply to both domestic and export markets. In this context, with the aim of encouraging supply diversification, a comparative return analysis for both cultivars, 'Osteen' and 'Kent', would be useful. This paper, based on accounting data taking from typical orchards in the area, both having 'Osteen' and 'Kent' plots, provides results from an economic analysis. On the basis of these results, some conclusions are drawn concerning the economic performance of both cultivars in the area. © ISHS 2013.


Calatrava-Requena J.,Institute of Agricultural and Fishery Research and Training IFAPA | Gonzalez-Roa M.C.,Institute of Agricultural and Fishery Research and Training IFAPA | Guirado-Sanchez E.,Spanish Research Council CSIC
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2013

Mango surface has been increasing in the coastal area of southeastern mainland Spain, from the pioneering orchards in the eighties to the current surface of about 3,300 ha. At the beginning different cultivars were introduced, namely: 'Sensation', 'Zill', 'Irwin', 'Tolbert', 'Tommy Atkins', 'Osteen', 'Lippens', 'Carmen', 'Otts', 'Manzanillo Núñez', 'Keitt', etc. and the initial production of these cultivars were consumed mainly for high income niche of the Spanish domestic market. Some export initiatives had also started. Test tasting made in 1989, 1991, 1992 and later in 1995 reduced a lot the target cultivars according to current domestic consumer preferences. Nowadays most (75%) of the mango trees growing up in the south east of Spain are 'Osteen' (early-mid season) and 15% are 'Keitt' (late season); the rest (10%) are of various cultivars being 'Kent' and the 'T. Atkins' the two more important. Looking for substitutive to 'Osteen' could help to diversify the supply for both domestic and export market. The paper shows results from two taste testing analysis performed with consumer panels in October 2007 and October 2009 comparing consumer preferences for 'Kent', 'Osteen' and 'Ataulfo'. Tests include tasting preferences and comparison with other fruits. In some cases (panel 2009), due to adequate fruit availability, two different fruits with different degree of maturity have been considered for 'Osteen' and 'Kent', namely: fruit at stage H (mature enough for consumption but firm enough to resist finger pressure), and fruit a stage S (slightly softer than H, just when it starts to soften under finger pressure). Panel tasting test shows a clear preference for 'Kent' at stage S, followed by 'Ataulfo' and 'Kent' H. Other results concerning relative flavor similarities and mango preferences with respect to other fruits competing with mango in the market place have also been achieved. © ISHS 2013.


Calatrava-Requena J.,Institute of Agricultural and Fishery Research and Training IFAPA | Gonzalez-Roa M.C.,Institute of Agricultural and Fishery Research and Training IFAPA | Sayadi S.,Institute of Agricultural and Fishery Research and Training IFAPA
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2013

While mango is one of the world most consumed fruits, at 35 million tonnes, mango trade is very limited, accounting for only about 2.5% of the total mango production worldwide. The two main importers are the United States of America (USA) and the European Union (EU), the latter importing some 25% of all mangos traded in the world, with a clear increasing trend. The European mango market has evolved from the trade of small amounts of fruit exported from former European colonies (postcolonial trade) in the 1970s to the current import-re-export market, trading more than 230 thousands tonnes, with a high component of business between European countries. This paper analyses the mango trade flows inside the European Union, emphasizing the case of Holland, which imports one half of the mango imported for the whole EU, then re-exporting more than 60% of the imports to neighboring countries, at an increased price with respect to the import-price paid. The main intra-European mango channels are identified. Some conclusions have been drawn in this respect. © ISHS 2013.


Sayadi S.,Institute of Agricultural and Fishery Research and Training IFAPA | Moreno J.L.,Institute of Agricultural and Fishery Research and Training IFAPA | Calatrava J.,Institute of Agricultural and Fishery Research and Training IFAPA
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2013

Tropical-fruit cultivation, basically mango, anona and avocado, occupies about 15,000 ha in the Spanish Costa del Sol. The socio-economic impact at the local level is considerable both in terms of generating income as well as of landscape shaping, as in recent decades these orchards have replaced either the former poor grassy vegetation on littoral slopes or traditional woody crops, such as almond trees or vineyards, in many cases abandoned, in inland coastal valleys. This new landscape, unique in Europe, has been threatened by the massive sprawl of building developments and tourist facilities as well as by the competition for soil and water between agricultural and non-agricultural needs. In this context, it becomes important to analyze the landscapes shaping potential of mango and other tropical orchards, and to estimate their relative importance in the aesthetic preference of the society as compared to other types of landscape features existing in the area. For this, the Conjoint Analysis method has been used for a preference test performed to a sample of potential visitors to the zone, using three basic landscape attributes for which different levels were considered, as follows: (i) agricultural use of territory: (tropical flatland orchards; tropical hillside orchards; greenhouses and agricultural crops on abandoned or semiabandoned slopes); (ii) geographic situation (sea shore or inland) and (iii) building level (Without building; traditional local building; high modern building and hotels). Afterwards, this evaluation was complemented with an estimation of a preference model for the tropical orchards as a landscape component. The results of the analyses enabled the identification of strategic lines to strengthen the landscape function of mango orchards in the area in order to foment their endogenous, integral, and sustainable development. © ISHS 2013.

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