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Andler R.,Inpes Institute National Of Prevention Et Deducation Pour La Sante | Guignard R.,Inpes Institute National Of Prevention Et Deducation Pour La Sante | Wilquin J.-L.,Inpes Institute National Of Prevention Et Deducation Pour La Sante | Beck F.,OFDT Observatoire francais des drogues et toxicomanies | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Public Health | Year: 2016

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate electronic cigarette use in France with a special focus on its relationship with tobacco smoking. Methods: The 2014 Health Barometer is a telephone survey of 15,635 individuals which provides a status update regarding electronic cigarettes use in France. Results: In 2014, 25.7 % of 15–75-year-olds had tried e-cigarettes. Among these, 23.4 % were current vapers (6.0 % of 15–75-year-olds). Among vapers, about half were daily vapers (2.9 % of 15-75-year-olds). Smoking prevalence was high among those who vape: 83.1 % were smokers (74.7 % were daily smokers) and 15.0 % were former smokers. Four out of five vapers considered that they had reduced their cigarette consumption through e-cigarette use. Vaping ex-smokers represented 0.9 % of 15–75-year-olds, which are approximately 400,000 people. This figure represents an initial estimate of the number of smokers who have successfully stopped smoking, at least temporarily, thanks to e-cigarettes. Conclusions: E-cigarettes in France were on the whole used by smokers. The e-cigarette could have helped several hundreds of thousands of individuals to quit smoking, at least temporarily. © 2015, Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+).


Du Roscoat E.,Inpes Institute National Of Prevention Et Deducation Pour La Sante | Du Roscoat E.,Paris West University Nanterre La Defense | Cogordan C.,Inpes Institute National Of Prevention Et Deducation Pour La Sante | Guignard R.,Inpes Institute National Of Prevention Et Deducation Pour La Sante | And 3 more authors.
Sante Publique | Year: 2015

Objective: This study was designed to identify the sociodemographic and psychosocial factors (based on the theory of planned behaviour) associated with the intentions of young people to remain non-smokers and refrain from experimental cannabis use, and their intentions to reduce drinking during a party, quit smoking and reduce cannabis use among users. Methods: 3,652 young people aged 15 to 25 years were interviewed by means of an on-line questionnaire. The sample was recruited from an internet access panel and constructed according to the quota method applied to the following variables: gender, age, region, habitat and head of family occupation. Results: Each of the psychosocial determinants (attitudes, norms and control) helped to explain the subject's intention not to smoke and/or use cannabis. The presence of a prohibition norm in the family was also associated with a decreased intention to experiment with cannabis. Among substance users, attitude determined the intention to quit or reduce the use of the three substances (tobacco, alcohol and cannabis) and control was involved in the intention to reduce drinking and quit smoking. Finally, norms only influenced the intention to reduce drinking during parties. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the importance of considering psychosocial factors to explain health behaviours and to identify and propose interventions. These results support the priority given to smoking prevention, justify the value of early interventions and confirm the importance of considering social inequalities in health when developing prevention programmes.

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