Institute national dhygiene publique

Abidjan, Ivory Coast

Institute national dhygiene publique

Abidjan, Ivory Coast
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

PubMed | Institute Pasteur, Agence de Medecine Preventive, Institute National dHygiene, Ministry of Health and 9 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PLoS neglected tropical diseases | Year: 2016

Cholera burden in Africa remains unknown, often because of weak national surveillance systems. We analyzed data from the African Cholera Surveillance Network (www.africhol.org).During June 2011-December 2013, we conducted enhanced surveillance in seven zones and four outbreak sites in Togo, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Guinea, Uganda, Mozambique and Cote dIvoire. All health facilities treating cholera cases were included. Cholera incidences were calculated using culture-confirmed cholera cases and culture-confirmed cholera cases corrected for lack of culture testing usually due to overwhelmed health systems and imperfect test sensitivity. Of 13,377 reported suspected cases, 34% occurred in Conakry, Guinea, 47% in Goma, DRC, and 19% in the remaining sites. From 0-40% of suspected cases were aged under five years and from 0.3-86% had rice water stools. Within surveillance zones, 0-37% of suspected cases had confirmed cholera compared to 27-38% during outbreaks. Annual confirmed incidence per 10,000 population was <0.5 in surveillance zones, except Goma where it was 4.6. Goma and Conakry had corrected incidences of 20.2 and 5.8 respectively, while the other zones a median of 0.3. During outbreaks, corrected incidence varied from 2.6 to 13.0. Case fatality ratios ranged from 0-10% (median, 1%) by country.Across different African epidemiological contexts, substantial variation occurred in cholera incidence, age distribution, clinical presentation, culture confirmation, and testing frequency. These results can help guide preventive activities, including vaccine use.


PubMed | Institute national dhygiene publique, Ecole nationale de statistiques et deconomie, Ufr Science Medicales Of Luniversite Felix Houphouet Boigny, UFR science pharmaceutiques et biologiques and Félix Houphouët-Boigny University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Medecine et sante tropicales | Year: 2016

In Cte dIvoire, the prevalence of malnutrition among children younger than 5 years exceeded 5% in 2011 and was thus considered serious. This overall prevalence may nonetheless mask differences and specificities between regions and municipalities. This study sought to determine the prevalence and risk factors of malnutrition among children in this age group in a semi-urban area of Abidjan.This exhaustive, descriptive, cross-sectional survey took place from May 6 to July 31, 2010. The childrens nutritional status was determined according to the WHO criteria. Univariate and multivariate analysis of factors associated with malnutrition (social and demographic characteristics, immunization status, childrens eating practices, and household characteristics) were studied.We visited 668 households and recruited 809 children. The prevalence of malnutrition was 22.5%. Multivariate analysis showed that the introduction of porridge after 6 months halved the risk of malnutrition. Risk tripled for children whose fathers occupation did not guarantee a regular income.Among the factors highlighted by this study, dietary practices seem the most amenable to corrective action. For example, the adoption of outreach programs by the Maternal and Child Protection services could improve nutritional practices in households.


PubMed | Pasteur Institute, Institute National dHygiene Publique and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Type: | Journal: BMC public health | Year: 2016

In temperate regions, influenza epidemics occur in the winter and correlate with certain climatological parameters. In African tropical regions, the effects of climatological parameters on influenza epidemics are not well defined. This study aims to identify and model the effects of climatological parameters on seasonal influenza activity in Abidjan, Cote dIvoire.We studied the effects of weekly rainfall, humidity, and temperature on laboratory-confirmed influenza cases in Abidjan from 2007 to 2010. We used the Box-Jenkins method with the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) process to create models using data from 2007-2010 and to assess the predictive value of best model on data from 2011 to 2012.The weekly number of influenza cases showed significant cross-correlation with certain prior weeks for both rainfall, and relative humidity. The best fitting multivariate model (ARIMAX (2,0,0) _RF) included the number of influenza cases during 1-week and 2-weeks prior, and the rainfall during the current week and 5-weeks prior. The performance of this model showed an increase of >3% for Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and 2.5% for Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) compared to the reference univariate ARIMA (2,0,0). The prediction of the weekly number of influenza cases during 2011-2012 with the best fitting multivariate model (ARIMAX (2,0,0) _RF), showed that the observed values were within the 95% confidence interval of the predicted values during 97 of 104weeks.Including rainfall increases the performances of fitted and predicted models. The timing of influenza in Abidjan can be partially explained by rainfall influence, in a setting with little change in temperature throughout the year. These findings can help clinicians to anticipate influenza cases during the rainy season by implementing preventive measures.


Blau J.,Institute Pasteur Paris | Faye P.C.,Institute Pasteur Paris | Senouci K.,Institute Pasteur Paris | Dagnan S.N.,Institute National dHygiene Publique | And 3 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2012

In January 2010, Côte d'Ivoire became the first GAVI-eligible country in sub-Saharan Africa to establish a National Immunization Technical Advisory Group (NITAG). The Côte d'Ivoire " National Committee of Independent Experts for Vaccination and Vaccines" (CNEIV-CI) was created to strengthen national capacity for evidence-based policy decisions with regard to immunization and vaccines. The primary reasons for success in Côte d'Ivoire were a strong political will, the availability of sufficient national expertise, a step-by-step country-driven process, and the provision of technical assistance to the Ministry of Health. The challenges included operating within the socio-political crisis, and initial reluctance from some stakeholders due to the potential overlap with other existing committees. The latter rapidly dissolved over the course of numerous meetings held with the SIVAC Initiative to clarify the mandate of a NITAG. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Institute National dHygiene Publique
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bulletin de la Societe de pathologie exotique (1990) | Year: 2011

Resurgence of yellow fever epidemics in CtedIvoire remains a major problem of public health. To describe this disease through the early alarm system of National Institute of Public Hygiene (NIPH) is convenient to us. This is a cross-sectional study with descriptive aiming, which proceeded with epidemiological surveillance service of NIPH. The data were collected over 7 years (from 2001 to 2007), starting from the cards of notification, reports, and registers of the service. The main findings of our study are that: 1) we listed 1468 suspect cases including 41 confirmed and the lethality rate was 17.07% among the confirmed cases; 2) most cases of yellow fever were recorded between the years 2001 and 2007; 3) confirmed cases of yellow fever were above 15 years old in 83% of cases. This could be explained by absence of immunization during this age period; 4) recrudescence of cases was observed during the rainy season (June-July and September-October) and the principal vector was Aedes aegypti; 5) data analysis revealed a mean level of 79% for completude and 57%for promptitude of notification; these rates are inferior to WHO norms and; 6) average time of vaccine response post-epidemic was 31 days. Late response is due to difficulties in supplying vaccines. Reinforcement of epidemiological surveillance, prevention by mass immunization, and measurements of hygiene and cleansing are essential to slow down the evolution of this disease.


PubMed | British Petroleum and Institute national dhygiene publique
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Revue de pneumologie clinique | Year: 2016

The National tuberculosis program (NTP) in Ivory Coast recommends that children under 5years living in a family environment with contagious tuberculosis patients, should receive Prophylactic treatment with INH (PTI), whatever the result of the tuberculin skin test (positive or negative) and their BCG status (vaccinated or not), at a dose of 5mg/kg/day for 6months. We conducted this study to check the implementation of this recommendation in three support services of tuberculosis in Abidjan, the economic capital.We conducted a multicenter, cross-sectional and descriptive study over 3years (2011-2013), on consented patients, adolescents and adults aged at least 15years, with a first episode of infectious pulmonary tuberculosis, in order to look for information on the INH prophylaxis in children under 5years living under the same roof. We made patients interviews during their visit for bacteriological sputum controls at the second month of TB treatment.Of a total of 412patients (53% males and 47% females) with a mean age of 34.5years and with a low level of instruction (66.5%), we noticed 639children under 5years living under the same roof with them. Information on the screening of contact children was given to 71% of interviewed patients (291/412). Of the 339children examined among 639contacts, 234 (69%) had received only an intradermoreaction (IDR) and PTI was finally administered to 64% of them (217/339).High proportion of contact children under 5 not examined is a major concern for the NTP and a missed opportunity to prevent additional cases of tuberculosis among children.


Attoh-Toure H.,Institute national dhygiene publique | Dagnan N.S.,Institute national dhygiene publique | Tagliante-Saracino J.,UFR des science medicales
Bulletin de la Societe de Pathologie Exotique | Year: 2010

Resurgence of yellow fever epidemics in Côlted'Ivoire remains a major problemof public health. To describe this disease through the early alarm system of National Institute of Public Hygiene (NIPH) is convenient to us. This is a cross-sectional study with descriptive aiming, which proceeded with epidemiological surveillance service of NIPH. The data were collected over 7 years (from 2001 to 2007), starting from the cards of notification, reports, and registers of the service. The main findings of our study are that: 1) we listed 1468 suspect cases including 41 confirmed and the lethality rate was 17.07% among the confirmed cases; 2) most cases of yellow fever were recorded between the years 2001 and 2007; 3) confirmed cases of yellow fever were above 15 years old in 83% of cases. This could be explained by absence of immunization during this age period; 4) recrudescence of cases was observed during the rainy season (June-July and September-October) and the principal vector was Aedes aegypti; 5) data analysis revealed a mean level of 79% for completude and 57%for promptitude of notification; these rates are inferior to WHO norms and; 6) average time of vaccine response post-epidemic was 31 days. Late response is due to difficulties in supplying vaccines. Reinforcement of epidemiological surveillance, prevention by mass immunization, and measurements of hygiene and cleansing are essential to slow down the evolution of this disease. © Société de pathologie exotique et Springer-Verlag France 2010 .


PubMed | Institute national dhygiene publique
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bulletin de la Societe de pathologie exotique (1990) | Year: 2011

In November 2009, ten suspicious cases of yellow fever, including six deaths, were notified in the region of Dengul, in the northwest of Cte-dIvoire. In order to evaluate the extent of yellow fever virus circulation and the risk for local people, a mission of entomological investigation was carried out by the Ministry of Health and Public Hygiene of Cte-dIvoire. Entomological investigations were conducted in the villages of confirmed cases (Banakoro and Tron-Touba) and the centers of consultation and hospitalization of cases during illness. Breteau index and recipient index were quasi nil. Aedes aegypti was absent among the captured mosquitoes. On the other hand, Aedes luteocephalus and Aedes opok were present at Banakoro and Tron-Touba with respective average biting rates of 0.8 and 0.6 bite/man/twilight. This situation of epidemic in the northwest of Cte-dIvoire could be explained by the deterioration of Dengul regions health system which is a consequence of the war started in the country in 2002 and which has lowered the immunity of the population.


PubMed | Institute National Dhygiene Publique
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Le Mali medical | Year: 2012

INTRODUCTION : An estimated 300 to 500 million clinical cases of malaria occur each year worldwide, 90% in Africa, mostly among young children. In Cote dIvoire, malaria is 46.03% of disease states and 62.44% of hospital admissions. In children under 5 years, it is 42.67% of the reasons for consultation and 59.68% of hospital admissions. In pregnant women, it represents 22.91% of disease states and 36.07% of hospital admissions. In Africa, traditional medicine is the first resort for the vast majority of people, because of its accessibility both geographically, economically and culturally. However, some modern practitioners show an attitude of distrust of traditional medicine and its players, calling them irrational. This work had set out to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of traditional healers in the uncomplicated and complicated in the context of collaboration between traditional and modern medicine for the optimal management of critical cases. MATERIALS AND METHOD : The study focused on traditional healers practicing in the city of Abidjan. The study was conducted using individual interviews over a period of 30 days. The interviews were conducted in local languages, with the assistance, if necessary, translators. For data collection, we used a questionnaire containing four items: the socio-demographic characteristics of traditional healers, their knowledge on malaria, diagnostic practices and traditional therapies. RESULTS : Of the 60 healers and included in the study, only six were women (10%), a sex-ratio of a woman to 9 men. 66.7% of respondents traditional healers are herbalists and 25% of naturopaths.Only 8.3% were spiritualists. The etiology of malaria most commonly cited by the traditional healers were mosquito bites (16.7%), food (1.7%), solar (1.7%) and fatigue (1.7%) . 25% of traditional healers are associated with mosquitoes, sun and fatigue. Symptomatology most cited were fever (100%), dark urine (86%), the yellow or pale conjunctiva (80%), vomiting (71.7%), nausea (58.3%) and abdominal pain (48.3%). Traditional healers recognized three types of malaria: the white shape, form yellow / red and the black form. Traditional healers malarious patients surveyed were receiving both first (58.3%) than second-line (41.7%). 78.3% of them practiced an interview and physical examination of theirpatients before the diagnosis. In 13.3% of cases they were divinatory consultation. Medications used to treat malaria were herbal in 95% of cases. The main sign of healing was the lack of fever (58.3%). 90%of traditional healers interviewed referring cases of malaria black (severe malaria). This reference is made to modern health facilities (90.2%). 68.3% of respondents practiced traditional healers of malaria prophylaxis among pregnant women and children under 5 years.CONCLUSION : A description of clinical malaria by traditional practitioners in health is not very far from that of modern medicine. Nevertheless, the logics of our respondents are etiological more complex and linked to their cultural context. The management of cases is made from medicinal plants in treatment failure patients are usually referred to modern health facilities. The involvement of traditional healers in the detection and quick reference risk cases can contribute to reducing child mortality due to severe malaria.


PubMed | Institute National Dhygiene Publique
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Le Mali medical | Year: 2012

An estimated 300 to 500 million clinical cases of malaria occur each year worldwide, 90% in Africa, mostly among young children. In Cote dIvoire, malaria is 46.03% of disease states and 62.44% of hospital admissions. In children under 5 years, it is 42.67% of the reasons for consultation and 59.68% of hospital admissions. In pregnant women, it represents 22.91% of disease states and 36.07% of hospital admissions. In Africa, traditional medicine is the first resort for the vast majority of people, because of its accessibility both geographically, economically and culturally. However, some modern practitioners show an attitude of distrust of traditional medicine and its players, calling them irrational. This work had set out to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of traditional healers in the uncomplicated and complicated in the context of collaboration between traditional and modern medicine for the optimal management of critical cases.The study focused on traditional healers practicing in the city of Abidjan. The study was conducted using individual interviews over a period of 30 days. The interviews were conducted in local languages, with the assistance, if necessary, translators. For data collection, we used a questionnaire containing four items: the socio-demographic characteristics of traditional healers, their knowledge on malaria, diagnostic practices and traditional therapies.Of the 60 healers and included in the study, only six were women (10%), a sex-ratio of a woman to 9 men. 66.7% of respondents traditional healers are herbalists and 25% of naturopaths.Only 8.3% were spiritualists. The etiology of malaria most commonly cited by the traditional healers were mosquito bites (16.7%), food (1.7%), solar (1.7%) and fatigue (1.7%) . 25% of traditional healers are associated with mosquitoes, sun and fatigue. Symptomatology most cited were fever (100%), dark urine (86%), the yellow or pale conjunctiva (80%), vomiting (71.7%), nausea (58.3%) and abdominal pain (48.3%). Traditional healers recognized three types of malaria: the white shape, form yellow / red and the black form. Traditional healers malarious patients surveyed were receiving both first (58.3%) than second-line (41.7%). 78.3% of them practiced an interview and physical examination of theirpatients before the diagnosis. In 13.3% of cases they were divinatory consultation. Medications used to treat malaria were herbal in 95% of cases. The main sign of healing was the lack of fever (58.3%). 90%of traditional healers interviewed referring cases of malaria black (severe malaria). This reference is made to modern health facilities (90.2%). 68.3% of respondents practiced traditional healers of malaria prophylaxis among pregnant women and children under 5 years.A description of clinical malaria by traditional practitioners in health is not very far from that of modern medicine. Nevertheless, the logics of our respondents are etiological more complex and linked to their cultural context. The management of cases is made from medicinal plants in treatment failure patients are usually referred to modern health facilities. The involvement of traditional healers in the detection and quick reference risk cases can contribute to reducing child mortality due to severe malaria.

Loading Institute national dhygiene publique collaborators
Loading Institute national dhygiene publique collaborators