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Prieto-Alhambra D.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Prieto-Alhambra D.,Institute Municipal dInvestigacions Mediques IMIM | Prieto-Alhambra D.,Charles III University of Madrid | Javaid M.K.,University of Oxford | And 4 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2014

Objectives: Osteolysis and subsequent prosthesis loosening is the most common cause for revision following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA). Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) could reduce osteolysis through its antiresorptive effects. We studied whether HRT use is associated with reduced revision rates in a community-based cohort of women undergoing TKA or THA for osteoarthritis. Methods: Female participants in the General Practice Research Database undergoing a primary TKA or THA from 1986 to 2006 were included. We excluded patients aged <40 years at the date of primary, and those with a history of previous hip fracture or rheumatoid arthritis. Women with at least 6 months of HRT were identified as HRT users. We further explored the associations among HRT use of ≥12 months, adherence (medication possession ratio) and cumulative use and revision risk. Cox models were fitted to model implant survival in years. Propensity score matching was used to control for confounding. Results: We matched 2700 HRT users to 8100 non-users, observed for a median (IQR) of 3.3 (1.5-6.1) years after TKA/THA. HR for HRT ≥6 months was 0.62 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.94), whereas HR for ≥12 months was 0.48 (0.29 to 0.78). Higher adherence and therapy duration were associated with further reductions in revision rates. Preoperative HRT appeared unrelated to implant survival. Conclusions: HRT use is associated with an almost 40% reduction in revision rates after a TKA/THA. These findings require replication in external cohorts and experimental studies. © 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & European League Against Rheumatism. Source


Prieto-Alhambra D.,University of Oxford | Prieto-Alhambra D.,University of Southampton | Prieto-Alhambra D.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Prieto-Alhambra D.,Institute Municipal dInvestigacions Mediques IMIM | And 16 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2015

Objectives: Osteolysis and subsequent prosthesis loosening is the most common cause for revision following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA). Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) could reduce osteolysis through its antiresorptive effects. We studied whether HRT use is associated with reduced revision rates in a community-based cohort of women undergoing TKA or THA for osteoarthritis. Methods: Female participants in the General Practice Research Database undergoing a primary TKA or THA from 1986 to 2006 were included. We excluded patients aged <40 years at the date of primary, and those with a history of previous hip fracture or rheumatoid arthritis. Women with at least 6 months of HRT were identified as HRT users. We further explored the associations among HRT use of ≥12 months, adherence (medication possession ratio) and cumulative use and revision risk. Cox models were fitted to model implant survival in years. Propensity score matching was used to control for confounding. Results: We matched 2700 HRT users to 8100 nonusers, observed for a median (IQR) of 3.3 (1.5-6.1) years after TKA/THA. HR for HRT ≥6 months was 0.62 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.94), whereas HR for ≥12 months was 0.48 (0.29 to 0.78). Higher adherence and therapy duration were associated with further reductions in revision rates. Preoperative HRT appeared unrelated to implant survival. Conclusions: HRT use is associated with an almost 40% reduction in revision rates after a TKA/THA. These findings require replication in external cohorts and experimental studies. Source


Margalef P.,Institute Municipal dInvestigacions Mediques IMIM | Fernandez-Majada V.,Institute Municipal dInvestigacions Mediques IMIM | Fernandez-Majada V.,University of Cologne | Villanueva A.,IDIBELL Institute Catala dOncologia | And 12 more authors.
Cell Reports | Year: 2012

Nuclear IKKα regulates gene transcription by phosphorylating specific substrates and has been linked to cancer progression and metastasis. However, the mechanistic connection between tumorigenesis and IKKα activity remains poorly understood. We have now analyzed 288 human colorectal cancer samples and found a significant association between the presence of nuclear IKK and malignancy. Importantly, the nucleus of tumor cells contains an active IKKα isoform with a predicted molecular weight of 45 kDa (p45-IKKα) that includes the kinase domain but lacks several regulatory regions. Active nuclear p45-IKKα forms a complex with nonactive IKKα and NEMO that mediates phosphorylation of SMRT and histone H3. Proteolytic cleavage of FL-IKKα into p45-IKKα is required for preventing the apoptosis of CRC cells in vitro and sustaining tumor growth in vivo. Our findings identify a potentially druggable target for treating patients with advance refractory CRC Source


Robles E.F.,University of Navarra | Mena-Varas M.,University of Navarra | Barrio L.,CSIC - National Center for Biotechnology | Barrio L.,Institute Pasteur Paris | And 41 more authors.
Nature Communications | Year: 2016

NKX2 homeobox family proteins have a role in cancer development. Here we show that NKX2-3 is overexpressed in tumour cells from a subset of patients with marginal-zone lymphomas, but not with other B-cell malignancies. While Nkx2-3-deficient mice exhibit the absence of marginal-zone B cells, transgenic mice with expression of NKX2-3 in B cells show marginal-zone expansion that leads to the development of tumours, faithfully recapitulating the principal clinical and biological features of human marginal-zone lymphomas. NKX2-3 induces B-cell receptor signalling by phosphorylating Lyn/Syk kinases, which in turn activate multiple integrins (LFA-1, VLA-4), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, MadCAM-1) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. These molecules enhance migration, polarization and homing of B cells to splenic and extranodal tissues, eventually driving malignant transformation through triggering NF-κB and PI3K-AKT pathways. This study implicates oncogenic NKX2-3 in lymphomagenesis, and provides a valid experimental mouse model for studying the biology and therapy of human marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas. Source


Prieto-Alhambra D.,Idiap Research Institute | Prieto-Alhambra D.,Institute Catala Of La Salut | Prieto-Alhambra D.,Institute Municipal dInvestigacions Mediques IMIM | Prieto-Alhambra D.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | And 14 more authors.
Journal of Bone and Mineral Research | Year: 2012

The association between obesity and fracture is controversial. We investigated the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and fracture at different skeletal sites in women aged ≤50 years using data from the Sistema d' Informació per al Desenvolupament de la Investigació en Atenció Primària (SIDIAP) database. SIDIAP contains the computerized medical records of >3400 general practitioners in Catalonia (northeastern Spain), with information on a representative 80% of the population (>5 million people). In 2009, 1,039,878 women aged ≤50 years were eligible, of whom 832,775 (80.1%) had a BMI measurement. These were categorized into underweight/normal (302,414 women), overweight (266,798), and obese (263,563). Fractures were ascertained using the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) codes. Multivariate Poisson regression models were fitted to adjust for age, smoking, high alcohol intake, type 2 diabetes, and oral corticosteroid use. Hip fractures were significantly less common in overweight and obese women than in normal/underweight women (rate ratio [RR] 0.77 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68 to 0.88], RR 0.63 [95% CI 0.64 to 0.79], p < 0.001, respectively). Pelvis fracture rates were lower in the overweight (RR 0.78 [95% CI 0.63 to 0.96], p = 0.017) and obese (RR 0.58 [95% CI 0.47 to 0.73], p < 0.001) groups. Conversely, obese women were at significantly higher risk of proximal humerus fracture than the normal/underweight group (RR 1.28 [95% CI 1.04 to 1.58], p = 0.018). Clinical spine, wrist, tibial, and multiple rib fracture rates were not significantly different between groups. An age-related increase in incidence was seen for all BMI groups at all fracture sites; obese women with hip, clinical spine, and pelvis fracture were significantly younger at the time of fracture than normal/underweight women, whereas those with wrist fracture were significantly older. The association between obesity and fracture in postmenopausal women is site-dependent, obesity being protective against hip and pelvis fractures but associated with an almost 30% increase in risk for proximal humerus fractures when compared with normal/underweight women. The reasons for these site-specific variations are unknown but may be related to different patterns of falls and attenuation of their impact by adipose tissue. © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. Source

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