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Alvarez E.,Institute Investigaciones en Ciencias Agricolas | Gutierrez B.H.,Institute Investigaciones en Ciencias Agricolas | Zinn R.A.,University of California at Davis
Journal of Applied Animal Research | Year: 2015

Forty-eight crossbred steers (296 ± 5 kg) were used in a 155-day trial to compare the feeding value of steam-flaked triticale (SFT) with steam-flaked corn (SFC). Dietary treatments were: (1) basal finishing diet (BD), (2) 40% BD plus 60% SFT, and (3) 40% BD plus 60% SFC. Substitution of BD with SFT or SFC increased gain efficiency (P < .01), tended to increase average daily gain (ADG) (P = .07) and decrease dry matter intake (P = .11). The derived net energy for maintenance (NEm) and net energy for gain (NEg) values of SFT averaged 2.28 and 1.59 Mcal/kg, respectively. Four steers (442 ± 28 kg) were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square experiment to determine the effects of replacement of SFC with SFT on digestion. Treatments consisted of a SFC basal diet where SFT replaced 0, 32, 64, and 96% of SFC. Increasing level of SFT decreased total tract digestion of organic matter (OM) (linear component, P = .03), acid detergent fiber (ADF) (linear component, P < .01), and digestible energy (DE) (linear component, P < .01). The replacement DE value for SFT averaged 3.88 Mcal/kg, corresponding to NEm and NEg values of 2.18 and 1.50 Mcal/kg, respectively. It is concluded that the replacement net energy (NE) value of SFT is 92–96% that of SFC. © 2015 Taylor & Francis Source


Gutierrez B.H.,Institute Investigaciones en Ciencias Agricolas | Alvarez E.,Institute Investigaciones en Ciencias Agricolas | Arrizon A.A.,Institute Investigaciones en Ciencias Agricolas | Carrasco R.,Institute Investigaciones en Ciencias Agricolas | Zinn R.A.,University of California at Davis
Journal of Applied Animal Research | Year: 2015

Sixty calf-fed Holstein steers (290 ± 2 kg) were used in a 90-d trial to evaluate the influence of fresh high-oil algae biomass as a feed intake and growth-performance enhancer in feedlot cattle. Steers were grouped into 5 weight blocks, and randomly assigned within blocks to 15 pens (4 steers per pen, 4 pens per treatment). All steers were fed the same steam-flaked corn-based basal growing-finishing diet. Three treatments were evaluated (1) basal diet, (2) basal diet plus 60 g/head water or (3) basal diet plus 60 g/head high-oil algae biomass. On an as-fed basis, the algae biomass contained: 78.4% moisture, 2.15% ash, 0.21% N, 0.07% starch, 0.50% neutral detergent fiber and 17.2% ether extract. Steers were fed once daily. Water and algae biomass treatments were top-dressed onto the basal diet at time of feeding. On a dry matter basis, algae biomass application accounted for 0.14% of average daily feed intake. Top-dressing the basal diet with water did not affect (P > 0.20) cattle growth performance or dietary net energy (NE). In contrast, top-dressing feed with algae biomass increased average daily gain (7.8%, P = 0.02), and tended to increase gain efficiency (5.7%, P = 0.08) and estimated dietary NE (3.7%, P = 0.09). We conclude that application of low levels of high-oil algae biomass may enhance daily weight gain of feedlot cattle during period of high ambient temperature. This effect is due in part to an apparent increase in efficiency utilization and in part to an increased dry matter intake. © 2015 Taylor & Francis Source


Gutierrez B.H.,Institute Investigaciones en Ciencias Agricolas | Alvarez E.,Institute Investigaciones en Ciencias Agricolas | Arrizon A.A.,Institute Investigaciones en Ciencias Agricolas | Carrasco R.,Institute Investigaciones en Ciencias Agricolas | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Applied Animal Research | Year: 2016

Sixty calf-fed Holstein steers (290 ± 2 kg) were used in a 90-d trial to evaluate the influence of fresh high-oil algae biomass as a feed intake and growth-performance enhancer in feedlot cattle. Steers were grouped into 5 weight blocks, and randomly assigned within blocks to 15 pens (4 steers per pen, 4 pens per treatment). All steers were fed the same steam-flaked corn-based basal growing-finishing diet. Three treatments were evaluated (1) basal diet, (2) basal diet plus 60 g/head water or (3) basal diet plus 60 g/head high-oil algae biomass. On an as-fed basis, the algae biomass contained: 78.4% moisture, 2.15% ash, 0.21% N, 0.07% starch, 0.50% neutral detergent fiber and 17.2% ether extract. Steers were fed once daily. Water and algae biomass treatments were top-dressed onto the basal diet at time of feeding. On a dry matter basis, algae biomass application accounted for 0.14% of average daily feed intake. Top-dressing the basal diet with water did not affect (P > 0.20) cattle growth performance or dietary net energy (NE). In contrast, top-dressing feed with algae biomass increased average daily gain (7.8%, P = 0.02), and tended to increase gain efficiency (5.7%, P = 0.08) and estimated dietary NE (3.7%, P = 0.09). We conclude that application of low levels of high-oil algae biomass may enhance daily weight gain of feedlot cattle during period of high ambient temperature. This effect is due in part to an apparent increase in efficiency utilization and in part to an increased dry matter intake. © 2015 Taylor & Francis. Source

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