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Martinez Larrad M.T.,Spanish Biomedical Research Center in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders | Martinez Larrad M.T.,Institute Investigacion Sanitaria del Hospital Clinico San Carlos IdISSC HCSC | Corbaton Anchuelo A.,Spanish Biomedical Research Center in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders | Corbaton Anchuelo A.,Institute Investigacion Sanitaria del Hospital Clinico San Carlos IdISSC HCSC | And 7 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

Objectives: Our aim was to investigate if genetic variations in the visfatin gene (SNPs rs7789066/rs11977021/rs4730153) could modify the cardiovascular-risk (CV-risk) despite the metabolic phenotype (obesity and glucose tolerance). In addition, we investigated the relationship between insulin sensitivity and variations in visfatin gene. Material and Methods: A population-based study in rural and urban areas of the Province of Segovia, Spain, was carried out in the period of 2001-2003 years. A total of 587 individuals were included, 25.4% subjects were defined as obese (BMI ≥30 Kg/m2). Results: Plasma visfatin levels were significantly higher in obese subjects with DM2 than in other categories of glucose tolerance. The genotype AA of the rs4730153 SNP was significantly associated with fasting glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance) after adjustment for gender, age, BMI and waist circumference. The obese individuals carrying the CC genotype of the rs11977021 SNP showed higher circulating levels of fasting proinsulin after adjustment for the same variables. The genotype AA of the rs4730153 SNP seems to be protective from CV-risk either estimated by Framingham or SCORE charts in general population; and in obese and nonobese individuals. No associations with CV-risk were observed for other studied SNPs (rs11977021/rs7789066). Conclusions: In summary, this is the first study which concludes that the genotype AA of the rs4730153 SNP appear to protect against CV-risk in obese and non-obese individuals, estimated by Framingham and SCORE charts. Our results confirm that the different polymorphisms in the visfatin gene might be influencing the glucose homeostasis in obese individuals. © 2016 Martínez Larrad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Source

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