Institute Investigacion Sanitaria del Gregorio Maranon

Madrid, Spain

Institute Investigacion Sanitaria del Gregorio Maranon

Madrid, Spain

Time filter

Source Type

Guzman-Fulgencio M.,Hospital Carlos III | Jimenez J.L.,Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon | Jimenez-Sousa M.A.,Hospital Carlos III | Bellon J.M.,Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon | And 9 more authors.
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes | Year: 2014

Our aim was to explore the association among ACSM4 and PECI polymorphisms and AIDS progression in 454 HIVinfected patients never treated with antiretroviral drugs (146 longterm nonprogressors, 228 moderate progressors, and 80 rapid progressors). For ACSM4 polymorphisms, rs7137120 AA/AG and rs7961991 CC/CT genotypes had higher odds of having a rapid AIDS progression [odds ratio (OR) = 3.21; 95% of confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.26 to 8.16; P = 0.014 and OR = 3.60; 95% CI = 1.38 to 9.36; P = 0.009, respectively]. Additionally, the ACSM4 haplotype integrated for both rs7961991 A and rs7137120 C alleles had higher odds of having a rapid AIDS progression (OR = 2.85; 95% CI = 1.28 to 6.25; P = 0.010). For PECI polymorphisms, no significant associations were found. In conclusion, ACSM4 polymorphisms might play a significant role in AIDS progression. Copyright © 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Vacas-Cordoba E.,Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon | Vacas-Cordoba E.,Institute Investigacion Sanitaria del Gregorio Maranon | Vacas-Cordoba E.,CIBER ISCIII | Galan M.,CIBER ISCIII | And 11 more authors.
International Journal of Nanomedicine | Year: 2014

Self-administered topical microbicides or oral preexposure prophylaxis could be very helpful tools for all risk groups to decrease the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection rates. Up until now, antiretrovirals (ARVs) have been the most advanced microbicide candidates. Nevertheless, the majority of clinical trials has failed in HIV-1 patients. Nanotechnology offers suitable approaches to develop novel antiviral agents. Thereby, new nanosystems, such as carbosilane dendrimers, have been shown to be safe and effective compounds against HIV with great potential as topical microbicides. In addition, because most of the attempts to develop effective topical microbicides were unsuccessful, combinatorial strategies could be a valid approach when designing new microbicides. We evaluated various combinations of anionic carbosilane dendrimers with sulfated (G3-S16) and naphthyl sulfonated (G2-NF16) ended groups with different ARVs against HIV-1 infection. The G3-S16 and G2-NF16 dendrimers showed a synergistic or additive activity profile with zidovudine, efavirenz, and tenofovir in the majority of the combinations tested against the X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1 in cell lines, as well as in human primary cells. Therefore, the combination of ARVs and polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers enhances the antiviral potency of the individual compounds, and our findings support further clinical research on combinational approaches as potential microbicides to block the sexual transmission of HIV-1. © 2014 Vacas-Córdoba et al.


Vacas-Cordoba E.,Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon | Vacas-Cordoba E.,Institute Investigacion Sanitaria del Gregorio Maranon | Vacas-Cordoba E.,CIBER ISCIII | Climent N.,University of Barcelona | And 9 more authors.
Nanomedicine | Year: 2014

Although the antiretroviral therapy has led to a long-term control of HIV-1, it does not cure the disease. Therefore, several strategies are being explored to develop an effective HIV vaccine, such as the use of dendritic cells (DCs). DC-based immunotherapies bear different limitations, but one of the most critical point is the antigen loading into DCs. Nanotechnology offers new tools to overcome these constraints. Dendrimers have been proposed as carriers for targeted delivery of HIV antigens in DCs. These nanosystems can release the antigens in a controlled manner leading to a more potent specific immune response. This review focuses on the first steps for clinical development of dendrimers to assess their safety and potential use in DC-based immunotherapies against HIV. © 2014 Future Medicine Ltd.

Loading Institute Investigacion Sanitaria del Gregorio Maranon collaborators
Loading Institute Investigacion Sanitaria del Gregorio Maranon collaborators