Institute Investigacion Biomedica INIBIC

A Coruña, Spain

Institute Investigacion Biomedica INIBIC

A Coruña, Spain
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Mateos J.,Institute Investigacion Biomedica INIBIC | Mateos J.,CSIC - Institute of Marine Research | Carneiro I.,Biobanco A Coruna | Corrales F.,Research Center en Medicina Aplicada | And 15 more authors.
Journal of Proteomics | Year: 2017

Analytical proteomics has experienced exponential progress in the last decade and can be expected to lead research studies on diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers in the near future. Because the development of this type of analysis requires the use of a large number of human samples with a minimum of quality requirements, our objective was to identify appropriate indicators for quality control of plasma samples stored in biobanks for research in proteomics. To accomplish this, plasma samples from 100 healthy donors were obtained and processed according to the pre-analytical variables of: a) time delay for the first centrifugation of the original blood sample (4 or 24 h) and b) number of freeze/thaw cycles (1, 2 or 3) of the processed plasma samples. The analyses of samples were performed by different and complementary methods such as SPE MALDI-TOF, DIGE, shotgun (iTRAQ, nLC MALDI TOF/TOF) and targeted nLC MS/MS proteomic techniques (SRM). In general, because the distribution of proteins in all samples was found to be very similar, the results shown that delayed processing of blood samples and the number of freeze/thaw cycles has little or no effect on the integrity of proteins in the plasma samples. Significance The results of the present work indicate that blood proteins in plasma are broadly insensitive to such preanalytical variables as delayed processing or freeze/thaw cycles when analyzed at the peptide level. Although there are other studies related to protein stability of clinical samples with similar results, what is remarkable about our work is the large number of plasma samples examined and that our analyses assessed protein integrity by combining a wide set of complementary proteomic approaches performed at different proteomic platform participating laboratories that all yielded similar results. We believe our study is the most comprehensive performed to date to determine the changes in proteins induced by delayed sample processing and plasma freeze/thaw cycles. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.


Aguirre A.R.,University of Sao Paulo | Loureiro J.,Institute Investigacion Biomedica INIBIC | Abensur H.,University of Sao Paulo | Sanchez-Tomero J.A.,Hospital Universitario Of La Princesa | And 4 more authors.
BioMed Research International | Year: 2015

Preservation of peritoneal membrane (PM) is essential for long-term survival in peritoneal dialysis (PD). Continuous presence of PD fluids (PDF) in the peritoneal cavity generates chronic inflammation and promotes changes of the PM, such as fibrosis, angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis. Mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (Endo-MT) seem to play a central role in this pathogenesis. We speculated that Rapamycin, a potent immunosuppressor, could be beneficial by regulating blood and lymphatic vessels proliferation. We demonstrate that mice undergoing a combined PD and Rapamycin treatment (PDF + Rapa group) presented a reduced PM thickness and lower number of submesothelial blood and lymphatic vessels, as well as decreased MMT and Endo-MT, comparing with their counterparts exposed to PD alone (PDF group). Peritoneal water transport in the PDF + Rapa group remained at control level, whereas PD effluent levels of VEGF, TGF-β, and TNF-α were lower than in the PDF group. Moreover, the treatment of mesothelial cells with Rapamycin in vitro significantly decreased VEGF synthesis and selectively inhibited the VEGF-C and VEGF-D release when compared with control cells. Thus, Rapamycin has a protective effect on PM in PD through an antifibrotic and antiproliferative effect on blood and lymphatic vessels. Moreover, it inhibits Endo-MT and, at least partially, MMT. © 2015 Guadalupe Tirma González-Mateo et al.


PubMed | Institute Investigacion Biomedica INIBIC, Hospital Universitario Of La Princesa, University of Sao Paulo and Hospital Universitario La Paz
Type: | Journal: BioMed research international | Year: 2015

Preservation of peritoneal membrane (PM) is essential for long-term survival in peritoneal dialysis (PD). Continuous presence of PD fluids (PDF) in the peritoneal cavity generates chronic inflammation and promotes changes of the PM, such as fibrosis, angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis. Mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (Endo-MT) seem to play a central role in this pathogenesis. We speculated that Rapamycin, a potent immunosuppressor, could be beneficial by regulating blood and lymphatic vessels proliferation. We demonstrate that mice undergoing a combined PD and Rapamycin treatment (PDF + Rapa group) presented a reduced PM thickness and lower number of submesothelial blood and lymphatic vessels, as well as decreased MMT and Endo-MT, comparing with their counterparts exposed to PD alone (PDF group). Peritoneal water transport in the PDF + Rapa group remained at control level, whereas PD effluent levels of VEGF, TGF-, and TNF- were lower than in the PDF group. Moreover, the treatment of mesothelial cells with Rapamycin in vitro significantly decreased VEGF synthesis and selectively inhibited the VEGF-C and VEGF-D release when compared with control cells. Thus, Rapamycin has a protective effect on PM in PD through an antifibrotic and antiproliferative effect on blood and lymphatic vessels. Moreover, it inhibits Endo-MT and, at least partially, MMT.


PubMed | Institute Investigacion Biomedica INIBIC, Imperial College London, Hospital Universitario Virgen Of Las Nieves, Hospital Universitario Puerta Of Hierro Majadahonda and 17 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the American College of Cardiology | Year: 2016

Filamin C (encoded by the FLNC gene) is essential for sarcomere attachment to the plasmatic membrane. FLNC mutations have been associated with myofibrillar myopathies, and cardiac involvement has been reported in some carriers. Accordingly, since 2012, the authors have included FLNC in the genetic screening of patients with inherited cardiomyopathies and sudden death.The aim of this study was to demonstrate the association between truncating mutations in FLNC and the development of high-risk dilated and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies.FLNC was studied using next-generation sequencing in 2,877 patients with inherited cardiovascular diseases. A characteristic phenotype was identified in probands with truncating mutations in FLNC. Clinical and genetic evaluation of 28 affected families was performed. Localization of filamin C in cardiac tissue was analyzed in patients with truncating FLNC mutations using immunohistochemistry.Twenty-three truncating mutations were identified in 28 probands previously diagnosed with dilated, arrhythmogenic, or restrictive cardiomyopathies. Truncating FLNC mutations were absent in patients with other phenotypes, including 1,078 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Fifty-four mutation carriers were identified among 121 screened relatives. The phenotype consisted of left ventricular dilation (68%), systolic dysfunction (46%), and myocardial fibrosis (67%); inferolateral negative T waves and low QRS voltages on electrocardiography (33%); ventricular arrhythmias (82%); and frequent sudden cardiac death (40 cases in 21 of 28 families). Clinical skeletal myopathy was not observed. Penetrance was >97% in carriers older than 40 years. Truncating mutations in FLNC cosegregated with this phenotype with a dominant inheritance pattern (combined logarithm of the odds score: 9.5). Immunohistochemical staining of myocardial tissue showed no abnormal filamin C aggregates in patients with truncating FLNC mutations.Truncating mutations in FLNC caused an overlapping phenotype of dilated and left-dominant arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies complicated by frequent premature sudden death. Prompt implantation of a cardiac defibrillator should be considered in affected patients harboring truncating mutations in FLNC.

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