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Martell-Claros N.,Institute Investigacio N Sanitaria Del Hospital Clynico San Carlos IdISSC | Abad-Cardiel M.,Institute Investigacio N Sanitaria Del Hospital Clynico San Carlos IdISSC | Alvarez-Alvarez B.,Institute Investigacio N Sanitaria Del Hospital Clynico San Carlos IdISSC | Herraiz M.A.,Institute Investigacio N Sanitaria Del Hospital Clinico San Carlos IdISSC
Journal of Hypertension | Year: 2013

OBJECTIVE:: To determine if the clinical or biochemical markers used in pregnancy can be applied as early predictors of gestational hypertension. DESIGN:: Prospective cohort study. Population: 315 pregnant women referred from the Prenatal Diagnosis Unit between weeks 10-13 of pregnancy and followed up to the childbirth. METHODS:: Biomarkers were measured in serum specimens in the first and second trimester of pregnancy. Blood pressure (BP) was measured in the first, second and third trimester. RESULTS:: The cumulative incidence of gestational hypertension was 6.01%. In the first trimester gestational hypertension predictors were uric acid greater than 3.15â mg/dl (Pâ 0.01), BMI greater than 24â kg/m (Pâ=â0.003) SBP at least 120âmmHg (Pâ=â̌0.02) and DBP at least 71âŠmmHg (PâŠ=âŠ0.007). After applied multivariate analysis just uric acid and SBP were statistically significant. CONCLUSION:: In our cohort of healthy pregnant women uric acid above 3.15âŠmg/dl and SBP at least 120âŠmmHg are consistent predictors of gestational hypertension in the first trimester. The most important implication of our study is the possibility to identify in the first trimester women at risk to develop gestational hypertension using available markers. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health. Source


Martinez-Larrad M.T.,Spanish Biomedical Research Center In Diabetes And Assoc Metabolic Disorders Ciberdem | Martinez-Larrad M.T.,Institute Investigacio N Sanitaria Del Hospital Clinico San Carlos IdISSC | Anchuelo A.C.N.,Spanish Biomedical Research Center In Diabetes And Assoc Metabolic Disorders Ciberdem | Anchuelo A.C.N.,Institute Investigacio N Sanitaria Del Hospital Clinico San Carlos IdISSC | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Background: Obesity is associated with numerous metabolic complications such as diabetes mellitus type 2, dyslipidemia,hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and several forms of cancer. Our goal was to compare different criteria to define the metabolically healthy obese (MHO) with metabolically unhealthy obese (MUHO) subjects. We applied Wildman (W), Wildman modified (WM) with insulin resistance (IR) with cut-off point ≥3.8 and levels of C- Reactive Protein (CRP) ≥3 mg/l; and Consensus Societies (CS) criteria. In these subjects cardiovascular-risk (CV-risk) was estimated by Framingham score and SCORE for MHO and MUHO.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Spanish Caucasian adults. A total of 3,844 subjects completed the study, 45% males, aged 35-74 years. Anthropometric/biochemical variables were measured. Obesity was defined as BMI:≥ 30 Kg/m2.Results: The overall prevalence of obesity in our population was 27.5%, (23.7%/males and 30.2%/females). MHO prevalence according to W, WM, and CS definition criteria were: 9.65%, 16.29%, 39.94% respectively in obese participants. MHO has lower waist circumference (WC) measurements than MUHO. The estimated CV-risks by Framingham and SCORE Project charts were lower in MHO than MUHO subjects. WC showed high specificity and sensitivity in detecting high estimated CV risk by Framingham. However, WHR showed high specificity and sensitivity in detecting CV risk according to SCORE Project. MHO subjects as defined by any of the three criteria had higher adiponectin levels after adjustment by sex, age, WC, HOMA IR and Framingham or SCORE risks. This relationship was not found for CRP circulating levels neither leptin levels.Conclusions: MHO prevalence is highly dependent on the definition criteria used to define those individuals. Results showed that MHO subjects had less WC, and a lower estimated CV-risk than MUHO subjects. Additionally, the high adiponectin circulating levels in MHO may suggest a protective role against developing an unhealthy metabolic state. © 2014 Martínez-Larrad et al. Source


Lill C.M.,Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics | Lill C.M.,University Mainz | Schjeide B.-M.M.,Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics | Graetz C.,Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics | And 60 more authors.
Brain | Year: 2013

A recent genome-wide association study reported five loci for which there was strong, but sub-genome-wide significant evidence for association with multiple sclerosis risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of these potential risk loci in a large and independent data set of ∼20 000 subjects. We tested five single nucleotide polymorphisms rs228614 (MANBA), rs630923 (CXCR5), rs2744148 (SOX8), rs180515 (RPS6KB1), and rs6062314 (ZBTB46) for association with multiple sclerosis risk in a total of 8499 cases with multiple sclerosis, 8765 unrelated control subjects and 958 trios of European descent. In addition, we assessed the overall evidence for association by combining these newly generated data with the results from the original genome-wide association study by meta-analysis. All five tested single nucleotide polymorphisms showed consistent and statistically significant evidence for association with multiple sclerosis in our validation data sets (rs228614: odds ratio = 0.91, P = 2.4 × 10-6; rs630923: odds ratio = 0.89, P = 1.2 × 10-4; rs2744148: odds ratio = 1.14, P = 1.8 × 10-6; rs180515: odds ratio = 1.12, P = 5.2 × 10-7; rs6062314: odds ratio = 0.90, P = 4.3 × 10-3). Combining our data with results from the previous genome-wide association study by meta-analysis, the evidence for association was strengthened further, surpassing the threshold for genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10 -8) in each case. Our study provides compelling evidence that these five loci are genuine multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci. These results may eventually lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease pathophysiology. © 2013 The Author. Source

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