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Corrientes, Argentina

Soneira P.,Institute Ictiologia del Nordeste | Casciotta J.,National University of La Plata | Almiron A.,National University of La Plata | Ciotek L.,Administracion de Parques Nacionales | Giorgis P.,Administracion de Parques Nacionales
Neotropical Ichthyology | Year: 2010

Astyanax erythropterus (Holmberg, 1891) originally described on the basis of one juvenile, is redescribed herein based on juveniles and adults from the type-localiy. The species differs from its congeners by the combination of 11-13 transverse rows scales above lateral line and 8-10 rows below lateral line; 49-54 perforated scales in the lateral series; iii-v,38-42 anal-fin rays, and dorsal, anal and caudal fins vermilion red in juveniles. The vermilion red coloration of unpaired fins in juveniles of Astyanax is only known in A. correntinus. © 2010 Sociedade Brasileira de Ictiologia. Source


Casciotta J.,National University of La Plata | Almiron A.,National University of La Plata | Sanchez S.,Institute Ictiologia del Nordeste | Iwaszkiw J.,Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales Bernardino Rivadavia | Bruno M.C.,Centro Regional Of Estudios Genomicos
Journal of Applied Ichthyology | Year: 2013

Four species of the genus Gymnotus are present in Argentina: G. inaequilabiatus, G. omarorum, G. pantanal, and G. sylvius, the last three species being recorded for the first time in freshwater courses. Gymnotus omarorum, G. pantanal, and G. sylvius together with others of the genus Brachyhypopomus are the group of fishes that bear the greatest impact in the trade as live bait for sport fishing in the northeastern region of Argentina. Within this large area, only the provinces of Chaco, Corrientes, and Formosa have regulations for the catch, trade, and sale of species as live bait. Unfortunately, the species covered by legal regulations are Gymnotus carapo and Brachyhypopomus brevirostris, neither of which occurs in freshwater habitats of Argentina. Comments are included as to how this bad taxonomy affects the regulations and conservation status of these species. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH. Source


Almiron A.,National University of La Plata | Casciotta J.,National University of La Plata | Casciotta J.,National University of Central Buenos Aires | Pialek L.,University of South Bohemia | And 2 more authors.
Check List | Year: 2014

Rineloricaria reisi, R. stellata, and R. zaina are registered for the first time in freshwaters of Argentina. These three species were found in the Río Uruguay basin in Misiones Province. As a result of these findings, five species of Rineloricaria are found in the Río Uruguay basin in Argentina. A key of Rineloricaria species from that basin is also provided. © 2014 Check List and Authors. Source


Almiron A.,Paseo del Bosque | Casciotta J.,Paseo del Bosque | Ciotek L.,Parque Nacional Pre Delta | Giorgis P.,Parque Nacional Pre Delta | And 2 more authors.
Check List | Year: 2010

Brachyhypopomus bombilla, B. draco and B. gauderio are recorded for the first time in freshwaters of Argentina. These species were collected in the Río Paraná basin at the Iberá Wetlands and Pre-Delta National Park. Brachyhypopomus bombilla, B. draco and B. gauderio can be sympatric and syntopic in Pre-Delta National Park, whereas B. bombilla and B. gauderio occupy the same environments in the Iberá Wetlands. Some records of B. brevirostris for Argentina are misidentifications of B. gauderio, whereas others could correspond to one of these three species. © 2010 Check List and Authors. Source


Santinon J.J.,Institute Ictiologia del Nordeste | Hernandez D.R.,Institute Ictiologia del Nordeste | Sanchez S.,Institute Ictiologia del Nordeste | Domitrovic H.A.,Institute Ictiologia del Nordeste
Revista Veterinaria | Year: 2012

This study was conducted to assess the effect of stock density on growth and survival of juvenile Rhamdia quelen reared in a semi-intensive culture system. A total of 147 R. quelen with initial weight of 1.27 ± 0.45 g were placed at densities of 5, 10 and 20 fish/ m3(DI, DII and DIII, respectively) in nine experimental units. During a 47 days trial, fish were fed with a diet containing 35% of crude protein. Fish from DI showed a significant increase in weight gain compared to fish from DIII (p<0.05), while fish from Dll did not differ statistically from the other treatments (p>0.05). By contrast, the highest final biomass was obtained in DI 11, differing significantly from DI, while individuals from DII did not differ significantly with the other groups. Survival rate was higher than 90% in all groups, showing no significant differences between treatments (p>0.05). These results indicate that the middle density would be the most appropriate to obtain acceptable growth parameters and high survival rates. Source

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